BOOTMGR is missing - detailed problem report

Discussion in 'Windows 7 Help and Support' started by kumarkush, Jul 24, 2010.

  1. kumarkush

    kumarkush New Member

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    Hi All,

    I have a single 500GB SATA HDD in my computer. (Rest of the specs are : 24x HP SATA DVD R/W, Intel C2D E7500 processor, Intel DG41RQI MoBo, Kingston 800 MHz 2GB RAM). When I first setup my hard-drive, I first installed "Windows 7 Home Premium 32-bit" on D: drive then "Windows 7 Ultimate 64-bit" on C: drive (some mis-communication between me and my brother).

    The computer worked fine for about 2 months before I decided to "Compress drive to save disk space" on C: drive two days back. I issued the command and went away. On coming back I found my PC shut-down. When I powered it on again, it said
    BOOTMGR is compressed.
    Press Ctrl + Alt + Del to restart.


    I searched Internet for solutions. Tried some of them. To no avail. Please note that I used a recovery CD already prepared for the process.

    Then I used "System Restore" from the System Recovery Options from the Recovery CD. Restore process was successful, but then I started receiving another even agonizing message
    BOOTMGR is missing.
    Press Ctrl + Alt + Del to restart.


    I again searched Internet, tried a few solutions, again to no use.

    In despair, my bro installed Windows XP on a separate, unused partition backed up his stuff from D: drive. But I cannot do the same. I have to login into my Windows on C: drive to get my data back (mostly databases of the Web-sites and applications I am developing or have developed, which can be backed-up from the software concerned). I have backed up my codes though. Luckily I don't keep anything else on the Windows partition.

    Sorry, getting personal. In the mean while I used the command "C:\bootrec /ScanOs" and "C:\bootrec /RebuildBcd". They say:
    Successfully scanned Windows installations.
    Total identified Windows installations: 0
    The operation completed successfully.

    When I run commands "C:\bootrec /FixBoot" and "C:\bootrec /FixMbr", they say
    The operation completed successfully.

    But I must say that when the recovery CD starts up initially (when it scans for installations of Windows), it does show that there are two installations of Windows on D: drive and C: drive in that order.

    I have tried "expand bootmgr temp" sequence of commands. I have tried individually decompressing the compressing the folders that were decompressed. Everything again failed. (Notepad works from the Command Prompt in the "System Recovery Options" on the recovery CD. I was able to expand the compressed folders and take some backup from the Open or Save dialog box of the Notepad).

    The "Startup Repair" option under "System Recovery Options" shows in its Log that no OS is installed".

    Any ways here's the output of the command "C:\bcdedit":

    Windows Boot Manager
    --------------------
    identifier {bootmgr}
    device partition=C:
    path \bootmgr
    description Windows Boot Manager
    locale en-US
    inherit {globalsettings}
    default {default}
    resumeobject {4815cc3c-6b60-11df-9403-ab5c0a4d15b4}
    displayorder {default}
    {4815cc3d-6b60-11df-9403-ab5c0a4d15b4}
    toolsdisplayorder {memdiag}
    timeout 10

    Windows Boot Loader
    -------------------
    identifier {default}
    device partition=D:
    path \Windows\system32\winload.exe
    description Windows 7
    locale en-US
    inherit {bootloadersettings}
    recoverysequence {4815cc42-6b60-11df-9403-ab5c0a4d15b4}
    recoveryenabled Yes
    osdevice partition=D:
    systemroot \Windows
    resumeobject {4815cc40-6b60-11df-9403-ab5c0a4d15b4}
    nx OptIn

    Windows Boot Loader
    -------------------
    identifier {4815cc3d-6b60-11df-9403-ab5c0a4d15b4}
    device partition=C:
    path \Windows\system32\winload.exe
    description Windows 7
    locale en-US
    inherit {bootloadersettings}
    recoverysequence {4815cc3e-6b60-11df-9403-ab5c0a4d15b4}
    recoveryenabled Yes
    osdevice partition=C:
    systemroot \Windows
    resumeobject {4815cc3c-6b60-11df-9403-ab5c0a4d15b4}
    nx OptIn


    EVEN WORSE, I can boot from the Win 7 DVD, it loads files and when I click "Install Windows", it says :
    A required CD/DVD drive device driver is missing. If you have a driver floppy disk, CD, DVD or USB flash drive, please insert it now.

    When I click OK, it again shows up a dialog saying:
    No device drivers were found. Make sure that the installation media contains the correct drivers, and then click OK.

    Now, I don't know where to find the drivers from and what drivers is it asking for.
    So I cannot format my partition even if I want to.

    My first booting device in BIOS is HDD, but changing it to my optical drive didn't make a difference.

    I am still stuck in BOOTMGR is missing.

    Any help please.
     
  2. cybercore

    cybercore New Member

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    Did it not ask for the missing driver the first time you installed Windows 7?

    If you can boot to windows (your Ultimate or 7), try EasyBCD 2.0.1.

    Try these commands:

    bcdedit /export c:\boot2
    ren c:\boot\bcd bcd.old
    bootrec /rebuildbcd
     
    #2 cybercore, Jul 24, 2010
    Last edited: Jul 24, 2010
  3. cybercore

    cybercore New Member

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    In bios, try changing SATA mode to IDE (not to have to install the driver).


    You need 7 installation DVD:

    1. Insert your Windows Vista or Windows 7 disk into your DVD player and restart your computer.
    2. The next screen you see should have the Language, Time and Currency and Keyboard boxes.
    In the lower left side there are two options: “What to know before installing Windows” and “Repair your computer.”
    3. Click on “Repair your computer”
    Windows will then try to find the installation directory for Vista or Windows 7, depending on what you have.
    4. Next up is a screen with a box called Recovery Options. Click the first option, Startup Repair.
    You’ll see a Startup Repair box with the message “Startup Repair is checking your system for problems…”
    5.When it’s done, it will prompt you to reboot.
     
  4. kumarkush

    kumarkush New Member

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    Thanks for reply, cybercore!

    I downloaded EasyBCD 2.0.1. Prepared a bootable FlashDrive with boot configuration. I booted from the FlashDrive on my Desktop. After loading files, a B/W screen shows up saying:
    Windows failed to start. A recent hardware or software change might be the cause.
    Blah.....Blah.....
    File: \Boot\BCD

    Status: 0xc00000098

    Info: The Windows Boot Configuration Data file does not contain a valid OS entry.


    Any other solution please
     
  5. kumarkush

    kumarkush New Member

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    I tried what u said. Since I have both HDD and DVD R/W SATA, the computer booted up saying "there is no bootable drive".
     
  6. cybercore

    cybercore New Member

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    I meant that if you were going to reinstall your Windows 7.


    Have you also tried these:

    ren c:\boot\bcd bcd.old
    bootrec /rebuildbcd

    ?
     
  7. kumarkush

    kumarkush New Member

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    Getting frustrated, I was trying to reinstall Windows 7.

    The command you are talking about, where should I type them?
     
  8. kumarkush

    kumarkush New Member

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    Thanks cybercore!

    I was able to run the commands you mentioned on the Command Prompt on the recovery CD.
    The commands ran successfully. I was able to add the 2 windows installations in the boot list.

    Then I ran the command "bootrec /scanos", it again says:
    Successfully scanned Windows installations.
    Total identified Windows installations: 0
    The operation completed successfully.


    Where's the problem?
     
  9. Saltgrass

    Saltgrass Excellent Member
    Microsoft Community Contributor

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    I would suggest you try the bcdboot command to try to replace the bootmgr you compressed. If you know which partition is active and where the boot files are, you can use that partition.

    If you have access to a Disk Management window for the drive, you might take a picture and post since it is sometimes hard to tell your exact setup without a picture.

    To check which partition has the boot files, you might boot to the install DVD and go to the repair section and Command Prompt. Go to each partition and type dir /a to see if the bootmgr file and boot folder are there (see attachment).

    From you description, you installed Win 7 on the D: partition first, which means it is probably active and has the boot files. If that is the case, you can use the command:

    bcdboot D:\Windows

    to restore the files. There are other switches you might need to use to specify a particular directory, which are referenced above. All this does is replace the boot files in the system partition, or the partition indicated by a switch.
     

    Attached Files:

  10. kumarkush

    kumarkush New Member

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    Thanks Saltgrass!

    I have examined my C: and D: drives.

    The C: drive does have bootmgr and boot folders. D: drive does not have any.
     
  11. cybercore

    cybercore New Member

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    I think the problem is what you've reported, you compressed your os and now its files are not recognized properly:





    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    If no luck with the repair feature and cmd's, then the option is to reinstall. Have you tried: bcdboot C:\Windows?
     
  12. Saltgrass

    Saltgrass Excellent Member
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    Did you go ahead and run the bcdboot command?

    Well, what I am thinking is that you bootmgr file is compressed and cannot be read. Or that partition is not active so the boot files are not seen.

    If you have access to a Disk Management utility, you could tell if the C: partition was active. You can use Diskpart to tell, and set it active if you need to, but once again, how you drive is set up makes a difference.

    In that same command window, type the following to see if that partition is active.

    diskpart

    list disk

    select disk 0 <-- if this is your Win 7 drive

    list partition

    select partition 1 <-- if this is your C: partition

    detail partition

    Does it show as active? Do the others show as active using the same procedure? (type exit to leave Diskpart)

    If it does, then using a startup repair should fix any other problems, unless the bootmgr file is unuseable. I have looked for a way to compress the system partition, but do not see an option for that.

    If the partition is not active, then I need to see a map of the drive. If you cannot do that with Disk Management, download G-Parted or Partition Wizard and burn them to a CD to boot. Then check the drive and make a picture. If the C: partition is not active, which one is. If D: is already active, you can put the boot files there, it won't hurt.

    I have a setup to duplicate your situation I will be trying later, but it won't be until later this afternoon that I can finish checking.
     
  13. kumarkush

    kumarkush New Member

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    I haven't tried. I'll just report back in 5 minutes
     
  14. kumarkush

    kumarkush New Member

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    Hi Cybercore!

    I tried bcdboot C:\windows. It says:
    Failure when attempting to copy boot files.

    Something intedresting I have found. When I ran the previous command you mentioned, I had set C: drive as my first drive and D: drive as second (while running bootrec /RebuildBcd command), infact it asked me to add the drives in that order. Now what has happened is that previously in System Restore Options, D: drive was the first drive showing up. Now it shows up C: drive as first drive.

    Thanks
     
  15. kumarkush

    kumarkush New Member

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    Hi Saltgrass!

    I ran the command list disk.
    It shows up my hard drive as Disk 0, status Online. Here is the output anyways:

    Disk ### Status Size Free Dyn Gpt
    --------- ------- ------ ------ ----- -----
    Disk 0 Online 465 GB 9 MB
    Disk 1 Online 3875 MB 0 B

    Disk 1 is my flash drive, which eventually was connected to my computer as I ran the command.

    Select disk 0 <!-- Worked Fine-->

    List Partition. Here is the output:

    Partition ### Type Size Offset
    --------------- ------ ------ --------
    Partition 1 Primary 62 GB 31 KB
    Partition 0 Extended 403 GB 62GB
    Partition 2 Logical 44 GB 62 GB
    ............... Rest all partitions as logical.............


    Select Partition 1 (which is my C: drive). Here's the output

    Partition 1 is now the selected partition.

    detail partition. Here's the output

    Partition 1
    Type : 07
    Hidden : No
    Active : Yes
    Offset in Bytes : 32256

    Volume ### Ltr Label Fs Type Size Status Info
    --------------- ----- ------- ---- ---------- --------- ----------- ----------
    * Volume 1 C KUSH_WIN NTFS Partition 62 GB Healty


    I checked all other partitions. No other partition shows up as active.

    Is the output OK?
     
    #15 kumarkush, Jul 24, 2010
    Last edited: Jul 24, 2010
  16. Saltgrass

    Saltgrass Excellent Member
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    If the entire C: partition is compressed, you may have to do something to uncompress it, as was mentioned, I believe. All I can think of is installing Win 7 on another drive, or possibly another partition then using that install to uncompress the partition. You will have to do this on a primary partition, since you cannot make logical partitions active and therefore not bootable.

    I would probably get a new drive and install on that without the other drive even installed. Then reinstall the other drive and uncompress that partition. You might then be able to remove the new drive and boot to the old drive.

    If the entire partition is not compressed and the bcdboot command will not work, if you have a Win 7 install on D:, try this

    bcdboot D:\Windows /s C:

    This will take the boot files from that install and copy them to C: If you compressed D: also, it may not help.

    Windows 7 takes up quite a bit of room. If you are using Ultimate and let the languages update, you might be looking at 30-40 GBs. You might think about using larger partitions.

    You may also want to unplug the flash drive in case it is causing some confusion.
     
    #16 Saltgrass, Jul 24, 2010
    Last edited: Jul 24, 2010
  17. kumarkush

    kumarkush New Member

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    Thanks for reply Saltgrass!

    Entire C: partition is not compressed. It was only compressed partially. Now, even I have already uncompressed the folders that were compressed. There are no compressed folders remaining in C: partition.

    I tried the command, it says

    Failure when attempting to copy boot files.

    And I have mentioned this a previous post also.

    Infact the command bcdboot C:\Windows is showing up the same message

    As for installing Windows 7 on a fresh drive, I don't think I can do that, as I mentioned in my opening post.

    The same problem I faced when I first setup my hard-disk. I don't remember how, but I took me 3 days installing first Windows 7 on my hard-drive. I had created partitions from my old computer with Windows XP. But Windows 7 did not recognize those partitions. I had to clear the complete hard-drive partitions on new current computer. It was very hard installing Windows 7 at that time also.

    If I use a new hard-drive, I suppose I would face the same problem.

    Any ways, what are the other options available?
     
  18. kumarkush

    kumarkush New Member

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    Thanks Saltgrass and Cybercore for replying to my 'massive' post.

    After having failed using all the solutions, I have in the end decided to format the C: drive, and repent over the losses.

    Formatting the drive is a problem in itself for me. But I suppose I will make it with immense online help.

    I am closing this thread from my side. If any one still wants to add any available solutions, you are most welcome. This might help others who are in trouble like me.
     

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