BSOD Problem after SSD install

#1
Hey Tech support guys/gals, i have run into a annoying problem with my new Intel 330 SSD.


First of all here my specs:
650W Corsair CMPSU-650TXEU
AMD Phenom2 X4 940 3.0Ghz, AM2+ Black Editio
Asus M4N72-E, sAM3
Corsair 4GB (2x2GB) XMS-2 8500C5
Asus GTX 570
500GB Western Digital Caviar Black SATA II
1tb Seagate



A couple of days ago i finally had it with thease long startup times in windows so i decided to buy a brand new SSD to install a fresh copy of windows on and use my other two drives for storage, heres what i did:


I flashed my bios with newest firmware
I copied all inportant documents to an external HDD
i made sure via the INTEL SSD TOOL that i had the newest firmware for my SSD
i shut down the PC and disconected all HDDs except my SSD and Changed my bios to ACHI, and shut down comp
(this is were the problems begin )


when i turned my Pc back on my bios could not find the SSD, so i shut it down and plugged my old windows HDD back in and "ding" the SSD showed up in BIOS, so i booted my windows CD and begain the installation


after sucsessfull install of windows (on new SSD) i started downloading all drivers and chrome and soforth until i shut down the PC. A couple of hour later i turned it back on and to my horror the Bios could not find my SSD, so i restarted, still no SSD in bios so i turned off my comp and turned off the switch on the back of my PSU and tried to start again,
AND IT WORKED! so i went into windows and started surfing but after a while i got BSOD.


Bottomline: my comp will only find SSD from "cold boot" also get BSOD randomly(every 10-60 min).


Precautions ive taken so far:
*Cold booted windows with only SSD plugged in (still only works cold boot)
*made sure via AS SSD that my drive is in ACHI mode
*made sure via INTEL SSD TOOL that i have the newset verison
*memtest86 for 8 hours last night (no problems)
*tried all diffrent SATA ports
*tried diffrent SATA cables



im running out of options here guys... Please help me, i will be forever thankful!




BSOD1:

Problem signature:
Problem Event Name: BlueScreen
OS Version: 6.1.7601.2.1.0.256.1
Locale ID: 1053


Additional information about the problem:
BCCode: f4
BCP1: 0000000000000003
BCP2: FFFFFA800578EB30
BCP3: FFFFFA800578EE10
BCP4: FFFFF80003189460
OS Version: 6_1_7601
Service Pack: 1_0
Product: 256_1
BSOD2:
Problem signature:
Problem Event Name: BlueScreen
OS Version: 6.1.7601.2.1.0.256.1
Locale ID: 1053


Additional information about the problem:
BCCode: 7a
BCP1: FFFFF6FC4001E460
BCP2: FFFFFFFFC000000E
BCP3: 000000000A341860
BCP4: FFFFF88003C8C000
OS Version: 6_1_7601
Service Pack: 1_0
Product: 256_1


Files that help describe the problem:
C:\Windows\Minidump\011013-8736-01.dmp
C:\Windows\temp\WER-10498-0.sysdata.xml


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#2
If your system is inconsistently detecting your SSD drive then you have a bad drive. As reliable Intel SSD drives are (some of the best) there is still that lingering possibility of getting a bad one, and that may just be your case. The F4 bugcheck you listed also hints to that, in that in parameter 2 a c000000e NTSTATUS code is mentioned, which means A device which does not exist was specified. This is a very common error with drive I/O problems, as a drive that is being accessed is spontaneously inaccessible since it is not longer responding, leaving the system to drop it and any pending I/O for it to fail.

While a problem with the drive controller on the mobo can be responsible, the fact it does it immediately with this drive upon installation just adds more credence to it being the drive itself. Plus it's cheaper and easier to work with replacing the drive than the whole mobo. Work on getting the drive replaced, and while waiting for it to return do research to see if there are common incompatibility issues with your mobo and this particular SSD model/brand just to make sure it's not that.
 


#3
If your system is inconsistently detecting your SSD drive then you have a bad drive. As reliable Intel SSD drives are (some of the best) there is still that lingering possibility of getting a bad one, and that may just be your case. The F4 bugcheck you listed also hints to that, in that in parameter 2 a c000000e NTSTATUS code is mentioned, which means A device which does not exist was specified. This is a very common error with drive I/O problems, as a drive that is being accessed is spontaneously inaccessible since it is not longer responding, leaving the system to drop it and any pending I/O for it to fail.

While a problem with the drive controller on the mobo can be responsible, the fact it does it immediately with this drive upon installation just adds more credence to it being the drive itself. Plus it's cheaper and easier to work with replacing the drive than the whole mobo. Work on getting the drive replaced, and while waiting for it to return do research to see if there are common incompatibility issues with your mobo and this particular SSD model/brand just to make sure it's not that.
thanks for the reply!!!

the strange thing is that the INTEL SSD TOOL is not picking up any errors, and the drive sometimes runs flawlessly for hours ^^ i indeed hope that the SSD is the problem in this case! ive been looking around on diffrent forums for the past day and a half and it seems the SandForce's SF-2281 controller is really bad (lots of crashes). Want me to post additional info from BSODs? thanks again ;)
 


#4
The Intel SSD tool only estimates based on certain data collection the health of the drive. It is not a guarantee the drive itself is ok. Of course, there could also be a motherboard storage controller issue as well, but again it's better to deal with the drive first before turning to the mobo.

If this drive carries the SandForce controller then yes, there's going to be instability problems. SandForce controllers are very unstable and while it's possible to get a solid stable drive out of one you'll need to run through a few to find one. SSDs are already well fast enough and push out a fine amount of IOPs, so there shouldn't be any need to risk trying to reach the top when you need to sacrifice reliability in the process.

I don't think posting any more info is necessary. I'm sure majority - if not all - of them are F4 bugchecks and as a result they're going to consistently harbor that c000000e error. If you feel more at ease in doing so go right ahead, but I'm thinking it'll be superfluous.
 


#5
The Intel SSD tool only estimates based on certain data collection the health of the drive. It is not a guarantee the drive itself is ok. Of course, there could also be a motherboard storage controller issue as well, but again it's better to deal with the drive first before turning to the mobo.

If this drive carries the SandForce controller then yes, there's going to be instability problems. SandForce controllers are very unstable and while it's possible to get a solid stable drive out of one you'll need to run through a few to find one. SSDs are already well fast enough and push out a fine amount of IOPs, so there shouldn't be any need to risk trying to reach the top when you need to sacrifice reliability in the process.

I don't think posting any more info is necessary. I'm sure majority - if not all - of them are F4 bugchecks and as a result they're going to consistently harbor that c000000e error. If you feel more at ease in doing so go right ahead, but I'm thinking it'll be superfluous.

hmm, starting to think that the SSD is the villan too, before i thought it was working in IDE mode but it turn out it dosen't :p
 


#6
hmm, starting to think that the SSD is the villan too, before i thought it was working in IDE mode but it turn out it dosen't :p
hmm, i dont know about the SSD being the villan :( could it be the Motherboard?
 


#7
What changed your mind? There's nothing we can do to determine whether it's the motherboard or not aside form removing the offending drive and see if the system stabilizes. If it works, the drive itself is bad. This still does not rule out possible incompatibility issues, however, unless you replace the offending drive with a duplicate one that you know works on another system. Again, it's best to try and rule the drive itself being bad rather than the mobo first.
 


#8
What changed your mind? There's nothing we can do to determine whether it's the motherboard or not aside form removing the offending drive and see if the system stabilizes. If it works, the drive itself is bad. This still does not rule out possible incompatibility issues, however, unless you replace the offending drive with a duplicate one that you know works on another system. Again, it's best to try and rule the drive itself being bad rather than the mobo first.
yeah went to my friends and tried it there, and it works like a charm, ATM the comp is stripped down and on my desk, im testing only the essentials now ^^ but feels like my moba is getting tired and old :p
 


#9
It may not even be the mobo itself is bad but that there's a compatibility issue with it. If it is an older motherboard that could explain it since their storage controllers weren't often designed to cater to SSDs, especially newer ones. Either way I hope things work out for ya. Good luck, buddy!
 


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