Cant take it any more

Discussion in 'Windows 7 Help and Support' started by Ron Simon, Dec 27, 2011.

  1. Ron Simon

    Ron Simon New Member

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    I just up graded to Win 7 and have had enough of my operating system telling me I either don't have access or I don't have permission or that I need to run something in Administrator mode. If I have logged in as an administrator (which I have) I don't want to see any of these rebuffs. I just want access to do want I want to do. I tired tuning off UAC but that still doesn't stop the onslaught. It's my darn computer, I want some respect from my operating system. How do I stop this and return COMPLETE control to me. Please help.
     
  2. davehc

    davehc Microsoft MVP
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    It is offering you complete respect, in that it is protecting you, as much as within its programming, total security.
    However, if you want complete freedom, and are aware of the risks,here is the way to go.
    There are a couple of ways:
    Open a command prompt(Run as Administrator).
    Type the following command and enter.
    net user administrator /active

    Log out and see if you have a new alternative login, as well as your existing one. If not, do it the long way.

    Shut down the computer for a cold boot. Tap the "F8" key as you are booting.
    Select "Safe Mode with networking" from the boot menu.
    Log into windows 7 with your personal account that holds the administrator access.
    Open a command window (START--->RUN--->CMD.exe). At the command prompt type the following net user administrator /active

    Log out and log back in as administrator.

    Another way:
    Press the Windows + R keys > type netplwiz > uncheck Users must enter a user name and password to use this computer

    Yet Another way to get to the same screen as the previous hint.
    Go to Start
    Type Control UserPasswords2. (or Open the Start menu, and type lusrmgr.msc )
    Click Advanced.
    Click Advanced again.
    Select Users.
    Select Administrator and untick the the box “Administrator is disabled

    Now log out and login as Administrator.
    The action leaves you a little more vulnerable to outside attack. Not a big issue if you are confident with your anti virus control etc.

    You can, at the same time, open Msconfig (Type Msconfig in the start window)
    Open the Tools Tab
    Select "Change UAC settings" and Launch.
    Window it down to rthe bottom.

    Apply and back out
     
  3. patcooke

    patcooke Microsoft MVP
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    It is really a last line of defense ensuring that whenever an attempt is made to execute a command which has the potential to do damage or give unauthorised access administrator privileges are requested before execution. It's like having to unlock your house door every time you arrive home, despite the fact that you are the owner. Permanently enabling and accessing the pc by the Administrator account as described by davehc will remove the problem for you but it's like leaving your house door permanently unlocked to save you the inconvenience of unlocking it each time you arrive home. Being logged on as administrator or just even leaving the administrator account enabled leaves a lot of doors open to potential security threats.
     
  4. Ron Simon

    Ron Simon New Member

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    I am the sole user of this PC. I have been using PCs for over 20 years and try to stay on top things. I don't like trying to figure out how to get around the road blocks that MS is putting in my way. And NO it is not like having to unlock the front door every time I come home. Using that analogy, it would be like unlocking my door when I get home and still not being able to get in the house.
     
  5. Ron Simon

    Ron Simon New Member

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    I do not understand how creating another Account with administrator rights will help. My account already has Administrator and I still get these annoying restrictions.
     
  6. davehc

    davehc Microsoft MVP
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    It is what is known as the "Global" Adminstrator and gives you rights to other, system, parts of the OS, excluding junction files/folders. But if you do not understand, and are dubious in any way, do not follw my post!
    But I see, rereading your post, that you have truned off the UAC, but still get the messages(?). Which parts of the OS are you trying to access?
     
    #6 davehc, Dec 27, 2011
    Last edited: Dec 27, 2011
  7. MikeHawthorne

    MikeHawthorne Essential Member
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    Hi

    I haven't had a lot of issues with this after turning off the UAC.
    Before that it drove me crazy.

    If you are still seeing a lot of this after turning off the UAC that's not normal.

    When it does act up I usually find that Grant Full Admin Control solves the problem...

    Grant Admin Full Control

    Take and Grant Full Control Permissions and Ownership in Windows 7 or Vista Right Click Menu « My Digital Life

    It adds a command to the right click drop-down that unlocks files, folders etc.

    Granted I still find an occasional folder that it just won't let me delete even though I created it myself.

    Mike
     
  8. davehc

    davehc Microsoft MVP
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    Mikes suggestion will certainly help you. But the reason for my query, at the end of my last post, was in connection with certain System folders, known as "Junctions"
    There is no value in accessing these folders, (among others). All they contain is a pointer to the actual folder in the OS where the files are kept. The OS has certain folders that are the same as in XP. They are there for compatibility purposes only, for legacy software, They don't hold data for the use of the computer, on a permanent basis. Junction points are similar to a shortcut. Allthey contain is a pointer to the real location. You should not change the access permissions on these folders. It could cause problems for legacy apps and Microsoft themselves advise strongly against it. It can cause infinite loops and eventually require a reinstall of your OS.

    Any folder that is shown dimmed with the shortcut arrow and gives an access denied message is one of these. To see the actual folder it points to, open an elevated command prompt ( Run as Administrator). Navigate to the folder the folder in question and give the command dir /al
    Junctions are indentified by <Junction> and the folder it points to is listed at the end of the line in brackets. For Documents and Settings, for example, the real folder is C:\Users.

    Try typing the command at the root. You will get a response <JUNCTION> Documents and settings. [C:\Users]
     
  9. OldTimer

    OldTimer Banned

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    Having to unlock my front door got a whole lot simpler, about 30 years ago now, when I lost my keys down behind my concrete steps one night when it was about -30° below zero. I had to pick the lock to get into my own house. (reminds me of Windows 7)
    The next day, I installed a numeric touch-pad on my door and a magnetic door latch. I said all that to say this, 'Never has my door told me "You don't have permission to perform this action".

    That long page of instructions was great, but if I had to do all that on every computer I set up, I'd never get done. So.....
    I commit everything to scripts and batch files.
    I have one little script called "Disable UAC" and the ultimate tweak, is my "Grant Full Admin Control" script.
    Then I have one to UN-Hide Hidden Files and one to "Disable Hibernate". When I disable hibernate, it gets rid of that "Humongous" Hiberfil.sys file in the root directory. My PC has two modes.... on and off, never hibernate.

    Then to get back screens and menus that look something like I want them to, I install the "Classic Shell" program.

    Everything I've mentioned here, plus a lot more, can be found in one RAR file on my web site, for quick and easy download.

    I'm now testing Win-8/DP and almost everything that works for Win-7 still works for Win-8.

    Happy New Year Mates!
    :cool:
     
    #9 OldTimer, Dec 28, 2011
    Last edited: Dec 28, 2011
  10. davehc

    davehc Microsoft MVP
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    Thanks old timer. In fact, the "long page of instructions" is just three variations of the same theme. Having completed either or, there should be no need for any further attack on security, except for the deadly, " Grant Full Admin Control", on system files.
     
  11. OldTimer

    OldTimer Banned

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    A few of us 'old timers' who have built our own computers for the past 30+ years, don't want to be told by our OS that we don't have permission to do something. All this "Security", so to speak, is really redundant, because most of us are smart enough to run GOOD AV and AS software on our PC's to keep them safe.
    Anyone who does NOT use protection, deserves whatever they get. Having unsafe internet is as bad as having unsafe S*E*X.

    I've taken the steps to insure that every file on my computer is 100% under MY control.

    "Grant Full Admin Control" is just 'Take Ownership' on Steroids! :rolleyes:

    Happy New Year!
    O.T. :cool:
     
  12. davehc

    davehc Microsoft MVP
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    There is little need, or purpose, to take ownership of system files or, as I expressed earlier, Junction files, unless the intention is to hack into something - not unknown, I've done it myself! The OS security is merely stopping the user from doing something accidentally, which could have serious consequences. That is the nature of the security, discussed in this thread. It certainly does not prevent the mischief maker from outside from getting on to your computer. Nor, for that matter, does antivirus control. But it does, possibly, help him to move along and find a more vulnerable user.
    For what it is worth (very little) I have also been in the business for 30 years - still learning. If you google, you may even find, somewhere around 2006/7, that I, and many other Vista testers around the same time, actually posted the now well known
    "Take ownership" scripts, as we got weary of having to alter the security manually to test out essential elements of the OS.

    I'm a 77 Year oldtimer, by the way.
     
  13. OldTimer

    OldTimer Banned

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    Ah so! So what you're saying is "do as I say, not as I do" Eh?

    That's OK. I can understand that.

    Just because you install either Take Ownership or Grant Full Admin Control, doesn't automatically give you or anyone full access to system files. You would have to take control over the Windows folder for that to happen.

    I usually just take control over the Program Files folders and the My Documents folders.
    You have to be able to un-hide hidden files and take ownership, to Activate Windows Mail in Win-7.
    I do that for my new Win-7 customers who are used to using Outlook Express as their email program.
    Windows Mail is almost identical to O.E.6 and the migration of folders and address book is pretty simple.

    Happy New Year, Y'all !

    :cool:
     
  14. MikeHawthorne

    MikeHawthorne Essential Member
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    The problem is that Widows 7 sometimes denies my access to folders that I created myself a few days before.
    I have no idea why.

    But I try and open a folder or access a file and I get the "You don't have permission to do this" message.

    These aren't system files, these are the files I'm working with, so why won't it let me access them unless I use something like Grant Full Admin Control.
     
  15. davehc

    davehc Microsoft MVP
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    "Ah so! So what you're saying is "do as I say, not as I do" Eh? "
    Nowhere, that I can see, have I suggested that.- As far as I am concerned, using a computer is like tasting wine. What works for you and makes you happy - go with it
    But sorry. I am ducking out of this thread as it now seems to be turning somewhat into a nowin argument- something I try hard to avoid on forums.
     
    #15 davehc, Dec 28, 2011
    Last edited: Dec 28, 2011
  16. OldTimer

    OldTimer Banned

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    I love Wine!

    Mike, that's my point exactly, why should I have to consult someone else for permission to do something on my own computer, when I AM the IT manager! Who else would it be?
    I built this dang computer, installed the OS and all the programs on it, so who should I have to call for any kind of permission?
    I shouldn't have to phone Bill Gates every time I want to rename a file or delete something.

    I have a 'Package' of software, scripts and tweaks that I run when I'm installing any new PC. or setting one up for myself.
    In that package I take full ownership of every file on my computer. That package is available for download on my web page.
    I get NONE of those infuriating messages telling me I don't have permission to do something.

    Don't force it.....get a bigger hammer!

    Happy New Year!

    :cool:
     

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