Custom DNS Resolution

Discussion in 'Windows XP Help and Support' started by hudson81, Aug 18, 2010.

  1. hudson81

    hudson81 New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2010
    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    0
    In Windows XP, is it possible to have DNS requests for a certain domain go to a specified DNS server while still allowing DNS requests for other domains go to the default DNS server?

    In Unix-type systems, I am able to to this with /etc/resolver entries but so far I've been unable to solve this issue on XP.

    Thanks in advance,
    Hudson81
     
  2. TorrentG

    TorrentG Banned

    Joined:
    May 31, 2010
    Messages:
    7,814
    Likes Received:
    372
    Hi.

    No, it's not possible under any version of Windows using Windows alone. Perhaps there is a 3rd party tool available to do that but then again, perhaps not. I say not because I really don't think there is a demand for such an app as I really can't think of any reason why you'd ever want to do that.

    Out of curiosity, do you have some technical reason to want this?

    Anyhow, you can add entries in the hosts file. The hosts file is like a local dns cache on your own machine. If an entry is present there, it will not look to the outside world to resolve the particular address. Instead, it will use what is in the hosts file.
     
    #2 TorrentG, Aug 18, 2010
    Last edited: Aug 18, 2010
  3. hudson81

    hudson81 New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2010
    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    0
    I run a DNS server on my private LAN that provides lookups for local servers/services.

    When one of my users connects to a VPN run by a third party (outside of my network), that VPN begins to handle ALL DNS lookups for the connecting machine. At that point, the connecting machine can no longer access services on my LAN via name lookups.

    I had hoped to avoid using a hosts file but maybe that's the only option...

    Thanks,
    Hudson 81
     
  4. TorrentG

    TorrentG Banned

    Joined:
    May 31, 2010
    Messages:
    7,814
    Likes Received:
    372
    Here's a great solution for you then.

    You can make a single hosts file that all machines on the network will use, instead of their own hosts. This is so you don't have to bother with copy/pasting the hosts file to all machines. Also, if you ever make any changes, you'd only have to edit this one hosts file and all machines will react to it.

    Now honestly, how to do this? I'm not entirely sure because I've never needed it nor applied it. I do know for a fact the Steve Gibson (www.grc.com) has taught about this in detail in the past as he uses this on his own personal network. So perhaps if you Google, you can find what I'm talking about.

    It shouldn't be very difficult to do with the proper information.
     
  5. OldTimer

    OldTimer Banned

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2010
    Messages:
    806
    Likes Received:
    29
    The HOSTS file can be a powerful tool if properly used.

    I use a free AV program and sometimes the free update server gets swamped by so many hits.
    So I've used the hosts file to re-direct my requests for updates to the Professional AV server.
    It works like a champ.
    I also use my custom hosts file to block bad web sites, that contain adware, spyware, trojans, etc.

    Cheers Mates!
    Old Timer
     

Share This Page

Loading...