Disable Libraries

Discussion in 'Windows 8 Help and Support' started by cbleman, Nov 3, 2012.

  1. cbleman

    cbleman Active Member

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    Does anyone know how to disable libraries in Win 8? I would like them totally gone. No reference anywhere. No turning back up like a bad penny. I know where I put my files. This is not a convenience, it's an intrusion. I am sure they are a good thing for some, but not for me. I searched the forum, and could not believe nobody brought this up before.
     
    #1 cbleman, Nov 3, 2012
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 3, 2012
  2. davehc

    davehc Microsoft MVP
    Premium Supporter Microsoft MVP

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    Unzip the attached and use the reg which suits you. Backup your reg before running the zipped file (s)
     
  3. cbleman

    cbleman Active Member

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    Thanks Dave,
    There should be a way to do this without a registry hack. I wonder if MS will put it in a future update. This will help.
    Errrr... I can't find an Ups or Kudos button, but you sure have my appreciation for your help. Thanks! (Skol?)
     
    #3 cbleman, Nov 3, 2012
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 3, 2012
  4. SupportTypeGuy

    SupportTypeGuy New Member

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    Hey cbleman, just curious what the issue with the libraries is. I've been pondering on that since I saw your original post. Seriously not trying to be inflamatory, just really curious as I do security and privacy work all the time and it may just be a different view than what we've seen before.
     
  5. cbleman

    cbleman Active Member

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    No problem.
    ooooo... Now you did it. The soap box comes out. ;-D I am the only account on my machine. The two major issues I have are,
    1. When anyone else is on my machine, it puts all of my files in one place to be viewed by whoever borrows the machine. I really don't have anything to hide, but I'm a real buthole about my privacy. This is a wonderful thing for people that do not, or cannot manage their hard drives, or newbies that can easily loose a saved file. For me though, it's a serious threat to my privacy.
    2. I'm paranoid! I don't like programs pawing through my hard drive, and listing all of my files in one place.
    As a security and privacy person, you probably know, if a serious intruder (or government agency wanting to monitor the public.) gets onto a computer, there is no hiding. I can see no reason however to make things easy. Toward that end, I even have indexing turned off.
    In surprising contradiction to this however, I detest UAC. I have disabled it to the best of my ability on my Win 7 machine, and turned it down as far as I can in my Win 8 machine. When I crippled it on the Win 8 machine, I found out that MS has blackmailed me/us into not disabling it. I guess (In their opinion) they think it's for our own good. My APPS will not run when I disable it.
    This I feel, is another miserable program. It will not let me work with some of MY OWN FILES! Even as an administrator! Others list specific files and applications in forums. I even get nagged in the super secret administrator mode. This is a hot topic with my peers. UAC I feel is to restrictive, and nags to much. Microsoft's security concerns are noted, but there needs to be a balance between security, and usability. For instance - I had a lot of calls, because customers could not open E-mail attachments after we did a full install at their home. Microsoft had, at that time, set the default on their E-mail program to NOT open attachments! While this was an easy fix for me, not being able to open attachments as a default seemed to me to be very silly. Sending pictures of the family, and work file attachments are a part of everyday life. Security/Usability. Where to draw the line is a hard decision. I feel the ultimate decision and responsibility belongs with the user. Not Microsoft. Of course I realize, if I turn off UAC and my computer gets trashed due to malicious activity, it's my own stupid fault. Others, on the flip side, think it's insanity to disable it, turn it down, or off. Everyone needs to be able to decide for themselves. Not have someone else's or group of persons opinions inflicted on them.
    That was a good question. I hope I have answered it. I CAN go on, and on and.... Well, Thank you for allowing me to break out my soap box.
     
    #5 cbleman, Nov 4, 2012
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 4, 2012
  6. MikeHawthorne

    MikeHawthorne Essential Member
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    Hi

    You might be interested in Magic Folders.

    PC Magic Software - Product Descriptions including Magic Folders to hide folders and hide files

    I've used it for years, (haven't tried it in Windows 8 yet but I will when I get my new computer) it makes folders you don't want people to see totally invisible.

    It's like they don't exist, you have to use a special link and a password to make them visible.

    I keep my credit card info and other financial stuff on my computer so i don't have to look for the stuff when i need it, and it makes me feel better having the stuff not show.

    As I said I've used it for at least 15 years, it's very reliable.

    Mike
     
  7. cbleman

    cbleman Active Member

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    Thanks for the info Mike,
    It sounds like you are a Security conscious person. Libraries are not the only personal security threat built into Windows by Microsoft. Look up index.dat files and index.dat viewer. Clear them, delete them, they just keep coming back. Storing info for anyone with a little know how that wants information about you and your system. Microsoft does not offer a way that I know of right now to totally stop them. Want to have fun? try to find them all and delete them one at a time. If anyone knows of a built in Windows function or option to kill them, I would like to know. Think clearing cookies, History, and Temp files protects you? hehehehe. .....and there's more.

     
  8. jebus197

    jebus197 New Member

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    So this doesn't work. The .reg file is for a Windows 7 system and has no effect on Windows 8. Does anyone know how to fix it?
     
  9. MikeHawthorne

    MikeHawthorne Essential Member
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    Hi

    Since I posted originally I got a new Windows 8 computer.
    I contacted the designer of Magic Folders and was told that they aren't developing it any farther and have no version for Windows 8.

    I searched and found Idoo File Encryption Pro.
    This seems to be main stream, you can download some version it at pretty much any software download site.

    For Windows 8 you will need the latest version 5.7.
    I tried one of the earlier versions and worked but had a couple of glitches like not remembering the folders so you had to select them everytime.

    Lock Folder software for Windows 8 secure lock data folder on cd dvd disc,hard drive,USB

    I have version 5.7 installed and running in Windows 8 and it works fine.

    I think is is slightly less convenient to use than Magic Folders, mainly because unlike Magic Folders you have to enter your password and click on the folders in the Idoo interface to hide them once they are visible.

    Magic Folders would hide the folders automatically every time you shut off your computers or clicked the link on the taskbar.

    It was only necessary to enter your password when you wanted to make them visible.
    With Idoo you have to remember to re-hide the folders if you make them visible.

    You can also name the link on your taskbar or desktop and change the icon, to whatever you want so you can make it look like something other than a program that hides files and folders if you want to.

    Other the that it works great the folders just disappear when hidden and don't become visible unless you do it through the Idoo interface.

    Mike
     
  10. CNCOldster

    CNCOldster New Member

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    Does anyone else sense the trend?

    I used a registry hack in Win7 to disable libraries and I constantly have to edit the registry to get file associations and file icons to work correctly. I also had to resort to third party software to get the os to remember window sizes and positions. I still haven't found anything that will do away with the stooped office ribbon...

    I've purchased a new laptop with Win8 and it's a disaster. I'm prowling forums for solutions and it's always the same: third party utilities.

    Buy your operating system from Microsoft. Get software to make it useful from someone else... I miss xp, and Office 2003, Visual Studio 6...
     
  11. MikeHawthorne

    MikeHawthorne Essential Member
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    Hi

    If I had it to do over again I would have gotten my new computer with Windows 7.
    I don't hate Windows 8 but it just plain is less convenient to use.

    I'm afraid that Microsoft is going the Apple route and trying to force everyone to use its own software.

    I hope I'm wrong but I can see a day when you won't be able to just download and install any software you want.

    You will be forced to buy everything through Microsoft, even things like Adobe products will have to give a cut to Microsoft and supply the software through them.

    Maybe companies like Adobe are big enough to take them to court and beat them but the little guy will be out of luck.

    The really bad aspect of this is that Microsoft it so behind the curve, that it's likely to slow the progress of software development.

    Remember the people who didn't think the internet was important enough to consider?

    Mike
     

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