Dual Boot Help

Discussion in 'Windows 7 Installation' started by cjdowney, Mar 8, 2010.

  1. cjdowney

    cjdowney New Member

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    My system currently dual boots with Windows 7 RC (obviously the trial has ended so the system shuts down every 2 hours) and XP, with 7RC being the primary OS. I want to remove both operating systems and have my full copy of Win7 as the only OS. The last time I tried to install a single OS over a dual boot, I had problems with the boot options screen, because it still showed the OS that had been removed, and its partition deleted and reformatted. How can I get around this happening on this machine?

    Help appreciated,

    Connor
     
  2. fjgold

    fjgold New Member

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    You might try using a partitioning tool that works outside of Windows like Gparted.

    link--->GParted -- Welcome

    D/L the .iso and burn to CD then boot to the CD.

    Choose default (click enter) at the three dialog boxes during Gparted startup.

    Once at the GUI use gparted to completely wipe the drive (delete all partitions).
    Then setup your drives partition structure like you want it.

    Gparted will create NTFS and Fat 32 partitions.

    Win 7 must be installed on a NTFS volume.
     
  3. john3347

    john3347 Extraordinary Member
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    Alternatively...

    As an alternative, you could remove (or disconnect) your hard drive and connect it to a second computer via USB/IDE or USB/SATA adapter (depending on your drive) and format the entire drive; NTFS, of course. You would then have a clean drive as though it were a newly purchased drive to install your OS, drivers and applications onto.
     
  4. fjgold

    fjgold New Member

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    I didn't mention this because I didn't know if Connor had a drive enclosure.

    I have a USB docking station that will take either 2.5" SATA laptop drives or 3.5" SATA desktop drives.
    I do almost all my partitioning\formatting chores using this device.
     
  5. john3347

    john3347 Extraordinary Member
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    I almost didn't mention this because I didn't know if he had a "host" computer available. :D

    I certainly did not post this suggestion to be contradicting fjgold in any way whatsoever. I was merely offering an additional method which does indeed require some additional hardware. A full harddrive enclosure is not required for this operation. I use a portable adapter (Sabrent part No. USB-DSC5, available from TigerDirect and other online retailers for approximately $20. TigerDirect stock No.: M501-1220) that works with 1.8", 2.5", 3.5",and 5.25" drives and works with IDE and SATA drives. (All necessary cables and adapters are included) It only requires a USB connection to the "host" computer and a 120VAC receptacle. If one has a spare computer available and has need to format drives more than once in a lifetime, this device, or a similar one, will save lots of time and trouble.
     
  6. fjgold

    fjgold New Member

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    No problem John, I didn't feel like you were contradicting me.
    It's good to have options.
     

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