Entire Network/Network Map

Discussion in 'Windows 7 Networking' started by blacksheep999, Jul 29, 2010.

  1. blacksheep999

    blacksheep999 New Member

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    Hi everyone,

    I've been on this problem for a while now so hoping for some assistance!

    We have a subdomain within our domain. In XP, I could view Entire Network and it would list both these domains under "Microsoft Windows Network", so I could browse PC's within those Domains as required.

    It seems I cannot do this in Windows 7. If I select "See Full Map" via Network and Sharing Center it automatically lists everything in the domain I am logged onto, but no sign anywhere of the subdomain.

    Surely Windows 7 will have a way to access a subdomain? I'm thinking of huge organisations (Universaties for instance) who will have 1000's of PCs on multiple domains needing to talk to each other.

    Does anyone know how to solve this problem?

    Thank you
     
  2. Trouble

    Trouble Noob Whisperer

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    Depends, I would think, to some extent on your network topology. I don't believe that if the domains are seperated by routers, that netbios information will pass.
    Also, depends on the DNS server configuration, if they are child domains or setup in different zones, make sure that your computer has the DNS server configured properly, so that it points to the correct server that hosts the records for the domain(s) or at least that the DNS server has the other in it's lists of forwarders so if it can't resolve the query it will forward to the DNS server that can.
    Also a WINS server will help with netbios name resolution, so if there is one in your environment make sure that you have your WINS properties configured to point to it.
    Very large environments generally don't allow nor support general network browsing, and usually disable the Computer Browser Service on client machines. Users in those environments generally have specific rules and guidelines as to where they can go, and how then can access those locations. Mapped resources, logon scripts, Group Policy Objects, governing there respective Organizational Units, strict access policies, etc. Usually, they find themselves using the software that's on their computers to do their jobs, and that software is already plugged into whatever backend resource it might need. In most cases, they wouldn't recognize the server name or be able to identify the resource they needed, even if they could see it.
     

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