EPA to raise "safe" limits | You will always be safe however much you are raidated !

Discussion in 'The Water Cooler' started by whoosh, Apr 4, 2011.

  1. whoosh

    whoosh Cooler King
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    Apr 15, 2009
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    previously wrote about how the Federal Government decided to wait almost 2 weeks to inform the public that rainwater across the entire US is contaminated with radiation from Japan’s nuclear fallout.
    There is now news that what was originally reported as only tiny, harmless, minuscule amounts is now being detected at levels several thousand percent greater than what is allowed drinking water.
    Forbes reports:
    EPA: Expect More Radiation in Rainwater

    The Environmental Protection Agency yesterday reported finding elevated levels of iodine-131, a product of nuclear fission, in rainwater in Pennsylvania and Massachusetts. The levels exceed the maximum contaminant level (MCL) permitted in drinking water, but EPA continues to assure the public there is no need for alarm:
    “It is important to note that the corresponding MCL for iodine-131 was calculated based on long-term chronic exposures over the course of a lifetime – 70 years. The levels seen in rainwater are expected to be relatively short in duration,” the agency states in a FAQ that accompanied yesterday’s brief news release.
    “In both cases these are levels above the normal background levels historically reported in these areas.”
    EPA said it is receiving “verbal reports” of higher levels of radiation in rainwater samples from other states as well, and that Americans should continue to expect short-term contamination of rainwater as radioactive isotopes spread through the atmosphere from Japan.
    “We continue to expect similar reports from state agencies and others across the nation given the nature and duration of the Japanese nuclear incident.”
    EPA is analyzing rainwater samples taken from 18 monitoring stations around the nation, promising to release results soon. It is stepping up sampling of rainwater, drinking water, and milk.
    The Food and Drug Administration released a statement on milk Saturday:
    At this time, theoretical models do not indicate that harmful amounts of radiation will reach the U.S. and, therefore, there is little possibility of domestic milk being contaminated as a result of grass or feed contamination in the U.S. FDA, together with other agencies, is carefully monitoring any possibility for distribution of radiation.”
    EPA also maintains 140 air monitoring stations. Those have detected radiation from the Fukushima nuclear disaster in five Western states: California, Colorado, Hawaii, Washington, and, as of yesterday, Nevada.
    You can read the report here.
    However, contrary to the EPA statements and the news being reported by the corporate media, Energy news points us to a press release issued by the Governor of Pennsylvania on the levels being detected in their rainwater:
    Radioactive Iodine-131 in Pennsylvania rainwater sample is 3300% above federal drinking water standard

    Governor Corbett Says Public Water Supply Testing Finds No Risk to Public From Radioactivity Found in Rainwater, Pennsylvania Office of the Governor, March 28, 2011:
    [Emphasis Added]
    … The [Iodine-131] numbers reported in the rainwater samples in Pennsylvania range from 40-100 picocuries per liter (pCi/L). Although these are levels above the background levels historically reported in these areas, they are still about 25 times below the level that would be of concern. The federal drinking water standard for Iodine-131 is three pCi/L. …
    On Friday, rainwater samples were taken in Harrisburg, where levels were 41 pCi/L and at nuclear power plants at TMI and Limerick, where levels were 90 to 100 pCi/L.
    Corbett emphasized that the drinking water is safe and there is no cause for health concerns. …
    “Rainwater is not typically directly consumed,” Corbett said. “However, people might get alarmed by making what would be an inappropriate connection from rainwater to drinking water. By testing the drinking water, we can assure people that the water is safe.” …
    Read the release here.
    See also: EPA: Radioactive Iodine-131 levels in PA & MA rainwater “exceed maximum contaminant level permitted in drinking water”
    Read more:
    In related news the Federal Government has began compiling information to inform the public and health care facilities the best ways to protect against the radiation.
    The Federal Governments also plans to raise the legal limits of acceptable radiation exposure so they can continue to say the amounts of radiation are below levels of concern.
    The EPA is at it again, they now want to change the "safe" limits of exposure to humans. The EPA wants to raise "Protective Action Guides" (PAG's) to levels vastly higher than those at which they are currently set allowing for more radioactive contamination of the environment and the general public.
    "According to PEER (Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility, the new standards would drastically raise the levels of radiation allowed in food, water, air, and the general environment. PEER, a national organization of local, state, and federal employees who had access to internal EPA emails, claims that the new standards will result in a “nearly 1000-fold increase for exposure to strontium-90, a 3000 to 100,000-fold hike for exposure to iodine-131; and an almost 25,000 rise for exposure to radioactive nickel-63″ in drinking water. This information, as well as the emails themselves were published by Collapsenet on March 24.
    In addition to raising the level of permissible radiation in the environment, PEER suggests that the standards of cleanup after a radioactive emergency will actually be reduced. As a result, radioactive cleanup thresholds will be vastly lowered and, by default, permissible levels of radiation will be vastly increased in this manner as well."
    This is very disturbing and I wanted the readers of this amazing forum to know this info. Remember, these are the same people who said the air was safe to breath on 9/11.
    EPA to raise "safe" limits | The Nuclear Engineering Department At UC Berkeley

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