Free Anti-Virus .vs. Purchased Anti-Virus

Discussion in 'Windows 7 Software' started by oneextraid, Jul 24, 2009.

  1. oneextraid

    oneextraid Banned

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    Are there any risks using the free products versus the purchased products?

    I have used a variety of the free products and each has produced some false positives. Not sure of they have missed any viruses or not.
     
  2. busydog

    busydog New Member

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    I've found antivir and avg free to both be very effective. You can pay for McAfee and get less IMHO.
     
  3. textureDnB

    textureDnB New Member

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    False positives are always going to occur if your not getting the occasional false positive your probably letting nasties through.If your getting an abundance of false positives (are you CERTAIN they are false) then your heuristics are probably set too high. Asfar as i'm concerned and i am a high risk user (i do all the wrong thing and go to all the wrong places) free A.V. is actually better as long as your not in a commercial environment which would disqualify you from using most free A.V. legally. Every time i've used paid solutions be they AVG, Norton or Kapersky (i think) I've had conflict problems some that left me without protection.And actually Norton is borderline spyware in most knowledgable professional opinions any way.
     
  4. catilley1092

    catilley1092 Extraordinary Member

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    If you choose carefully, some free products are as good as their paid counterparts. For years, I used Avast (free home version) on XP Pro, and it kept the nasty bugs out. Once in a while, I'd do a scan with MBAM or Windows Live Safety Scanner (both also free), just to make sure that Avast was doing it's job.

    Today, I'm running Windows 7 Pro (x64), and MSE gives me all of the protection that I need, is lightweight, no BSOD's, you can update it through MS update. I keep tabs on it by an occasional scan with MBAM & ESET Online Scanner.

    The problem with the paid AV's is this: They seek to contain only, so that they can get you to renew over & over. The AV industry loves viruses, this is how they make their money. Possibly the only AV/Malware solution that's looking to eradicate infections is MSE, they are from Microsoft, and MS doesn't want our systems infected, hence the birth of MSE, totally free. The only cost incurred is having a genuine copy of Windows.

    The paid ones doesn't give a damn if the net is full of infections, as long as they can "contain" them, or "quarantine" them, as the term is called to us. Honestly, they don't. It's their bread & butter, their livelihood. As long as the users pays them their yearly membership fee, they'll continue to be protected (I hope). And that brings in another point altogether, no AV can be correct 100% of the time, under all conditions. There's no way. If any single AV/Malware suite could guarantee this, and deliver, that one company would be wealthy, because we all would turn to it. But it's fantasy to even think that a single solution can keep up with all of the virus samples that's produced daily.

    So to answer the question as to free vs paid AV's goes, I say free, if either you choose MSE (the only one that's even trying, not making any money on it), or a good free one along with MBAM as a standalone scanner as second string protection (we need a second string plan anyway).

    And remember, the best AV is the one between the chair & keyboard. Practice safe computing practices, such as not opening "spam", not clicking onto links that's too good to be true, and scan each and every attachment that you get, no matter what the source. Your friend can be carrying a virus, and not know it.

    Safe & Happy computing to everyone,

    Cat
     
  5. Joe S

    Joe S Excellent Member

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    I would avoid the AVG it's frequently recommended to be uninstalled when reviewing crash dumps. I had issues with it in past and switched to Avast.
    Joe
     
  6. Highwayman

    Highwayman Extraordinary Member

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    My only worry with MSE is that it's the same people that made the worthless defender app over the years, but I do agree with the reasoning why Microsoft are finally rolling out quality Anti-Virus for free. Every AV app seems to go through the Godlike to Gutterworthy period... seen it happen to Norton, Macaffe, Kasperski, AVG.... all have fallen greatly during the Vista years
     
  7. Super Sarge

    Super Sarge New Member

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    I use M$ Security essentials along with Super Anti Spyware, Spyware Blaster and Malware Bytes on two machines and I have never had any problems. This MS product Security Essentials is a fine program got very good reviews from various sources. To say something is free means it is not worth it is painting with a very broad brush. Judge the product and what it does not the fact it is free.
     
  8. Andrea Borman

    Andrea Borman Honorable Member

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    Well, I do not have any anti virus program installed on my 3 laptops,Netbooks.And I have never used an anti virus program, and I do not intend to.

    I think they would cause more problems than what they would solve. From what I read an anti virus may block access to some programs. Or mistake a program for a virus when it has not got a virus.

    And anyway on Windows 7 we have got Windows defender and Malicious Software Removal Tool-MRT for short. These two tools scan for malware and remove any found. But do not take over your computer like an anti virus does.

    I just do not like the idea of another program removing software or blocking programs without my permission. Which is what an anti virus does.

    But I have never ever used an anti virus program and I do not intend to in the future. I think an anti virus is un necessary. Andrea Borman.
     
  9. cybercore

    cybercore New Member

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    This approach is not new and, I guess, nothing's wrong with it. However, why not to try these good and freeware solutions:

    https://www.microsoft.com/security_essentials/

    Malwarebytes


    Anytime you can disable them in msconfig and control panel > administrative > services. [​IMG]
     
    1 person likes this.
  10. Highwayman

    Highwayman Extraordinary Member

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    Possibly the stupidest thing I've ever read, forgivable for noobs maybe, but if it's hooked up to the net and you dont have Anti-Virus it's just a matter of time before you get some data killing worm as even the safe websites get hacked. It's very reckless to promote such ideas as while on the surface you may think its fine, you could be on a botnet and never know. As for windows defender, likely the least effective malware finder in history, and MRT which only does "after the fact" cleans of a select few trojans (hardly worth a damn in other words)....well it's like having sex with a condom made of rice paper frankly. I'm now waiting for the follow up statement along the lines of "Firewalls aren't needed".

    These days there is simply no excuse not to use an antivirus package, theres lots of totally free ones that compete well with retail ones, the cpu overhead is tiny on even a moderate cpu as are memory footprints, mine doesn't even use 1% of my resources, less resources than opening my browser to view this site in fact!!!! I can only think you've had bad experiences of system lag, most often caused by having more than one running (easy to do as many apps bundle these with them and unless you always choose custom install option, wont be offered to untick the additional install) or something written by Symantec...(usually the most system lagging Antivirus maker in the world).

    As for low resource ones to go for, Avast is one of the best free ones, or Microsofts own Security Essentials 2
     
    #10 Highwayman, Feb 27, 2011
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2011
    2 people like this.
  11. Andrea Borman

    Andrea Borman Honorable Member

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    Well,I still am not going to use an anti virus program. I am pretty sure that the scans from Windows defender and Malicious Software removal Tool-MRT are right,and my computer does not have a virus. After all is that not what those two tools are for? For scanning and removing viruses and malware.

    But out of curiosity I have used Linux Mint and I understand that there is no virus protection or anti virus program for Linux. So what do Linux users use to scan for and remove viruses if any are found?

    I bet that you can get a virus on Linux as well as anywhere else. If Linux users don't need an anti virus program to run their operating system,then neither do Windows users. As Windows is probably a safer operating system than Linux.

    All right Microsoft Security Essentials is free. But who wants a program that is going to take over the whole computer? A lot of these anti virus programs have have given false readings. That is, they have said you have a computer virus and have removed and blocked the software. When in reality you have not got a virus.

    So Windows defender and MRT are right. If their scans say you don't have a computer virus, then you don't have any. And if there is a problem it is some thing else not a virus. Andrea Borman.
     
  12. Veegertx

    Veegertx Honorable Member

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    Andrea
    You need to be running something if you are connecting to internet. If nothing else to protect us from your worm guided launching pads. Do you realize how many unkowing out there are infected after they let their virus progs elapse when it cost to update. They slip in there without knowing. Like the Stuxnet slipped into the plant in Iran
    MSE like any other you can set not to remove but warn. It is low footprint compared to as I recall old Norton day's where it would bog down the whole PC
     
  13. Veegertx

    Veegertx Honorable Member

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    They are after the fact and many virus code will know how to avoid them Do NOT rely on just that. As mentioned above MSE is free for a genuine install.
     
    #13 Veegertx, Feb 27, 2011
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2011
  14. Veegertx

    Veegertx Honorable Member

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    You are referring to linux. Do some math. If I wanted to build a virus should I go for 90% infection(Windows) or 10 the others? Most viruses go after windows because it has a larger majority on the www and most windows user's are too foolish to keep their PC updated and keep anti-virii programs updated. Linux takes a lot of time to get setup right so user's that use this are more keen to their OS. I agree there haven't been too many Nix infections on the web or media but the day is coming I think. Somebody want to get their kicks thinking they can infect those machines and it will happen eventually

    On that MRT,
    I had a PC get infected at work and installed both Symantec/MRT and they found like 78 infected files. It couldn't remove them all so I had to format. This was a machine that does automated stuff. Someone set it up with Administrator and no password. After format it took me 3 days to get that machine to run again cause I didn't know how everything was setup in it.
     
  15. Highwayman

    Highwayman Extraordinary Member

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    Quite agree Veegertx, the whole virus maker scene doesnt waste time writing stuff to attack the OS's with a low market share very much, much the same reason you don't hear much about Macs being infected. Please Andrea do not make the stupid mistake of assuming you are safe with applications proven to be little more than placebos.

    As for the big name branded Antivirus and Anti-Malware apps blocking stuff, the range of tolerance is stupidly small percentages for false postives making it a redundant argument, to think they are "taking over" is being paranoid for all the wrong reasons, I wonder if you would feel the same if you had all your bank details stolen from being negligent in making the system safer.

    As a system builder, I regularly have to fix people's rigs and the most common causes of problems is being click happy with no protection, how to spot that...simple...if you have lots of tasks by the system clock taskbar or over a handful of web browser (BHO) applets running you are likely in the high risk group of people for getting problems, based on my 25years experience in the field. You'd be amazed how many come to me with 2 or more Antivirus apps running, it's as common as luddite folk that use none at all, then they wonder why they get problems...lol I honestly think we've reached an age where people need to do a academic level qualification and exam like driving tests before being let loose on a computer, but then i'd make far less money repairing them...lol
     
    #15 Highwayman, Feb 27, 2011
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2011
  16. Joe S

    Joe S Excellent Member

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    Lot's of luck with no AV besides the internet you can get a virus from an infected removable disk. They think the way the computer for Iran's nuclear reactor was infected from an infected USB flash drive.
    Joe
     
  17. Andrea Borman

    Andrea Borman Honorable Member

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    But on Linux they do not have anti virus programs or do they? So what do they use to protect their operating system? And if you get a virus on Linux,how do you get rid of it? I would be interested to know. Andrea Borman.
     
  18. Veegertx

    Veegertx Honorable Member

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    Do I Need an AntiVirus Program on Linux? | Techthrob.com
    Yes there are some out there. Basically it say that Linux anti-vir are there to keep windows viruses from spreading.
     
  19. Andrea Borman

    Andrea Borman Honorable Member

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    But are you using an older version of Windows and Internet Explorer? And is your computer set to public network? If it is you need to reset it to home network and upgrade your Internet Explorer.

    That could be a reason why your computer has problems. Andrea Borman.
     
    #19 Andrea Borman, Feb 27, 2011
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2011
  20. Andrea Borman

    Andrea Borman Honorable Member

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    I thought that this article I found on the Internet will be interesting to read. This confirms my idea that having an anti virus software on your computer is a waste of time and space. As you do not need it, if you are using your computer at home, and are not using any of the advanced features.

    That is remote desktop connection,where you can connect to your computer from another computer or from a public computer. Such as from an office or an Internet cafe. Or are using it in coffee shop,where it is connected to public Wi Fi which is often hacked. Also make sure your computer is set to home network if it is a home computer. Do not set it to public network.

    Here is the article I found- Do I need anti-virus software?

    So if you are a home computer user like I am and are just using your computer for general or basic things,you do not need a virus protection program.

    After all why saddle your computer down with something it does not need? It makes sense. Andrea Borman.
     
    #20 Andrea Borman, Mar 1, 2011
    Last edited: Mar 1, 2011

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