how can i know that PSU i am using is sufficient for my pc..

Discussion in 'Windows 7 Hardware' started by jasdeep, Feb 12, 2012.

  1. jasdeep

    jasdeep New Member

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    Hi all,
    I am new at this..actually few months back i assembelled my pc on my own..my pc configration is:
    graphic card:ATI radeon 5660
    1 TB HD
    8GB RAM
    eXtreme Power Plus 460W (120mm fan) PSU.
    Windows 7
    i7 processor...
    DVD writer
    The problem i facing is now whenever i turn ON my pc...my room light starts fluctuating...
    What does this mean???? Why it is happening after So many months...
    When i listen at the back of PSU, while my pc turned ON... A very low clicking sound is coming..which i assume is the reason for this fluctuation...how can it be verify or corrected.
     
  2. bassfisher6522

    bassfisher6522 Essential Member

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    Google PSU calculators, that should give you an idea on the wattage needed.
     
  3. jasdeep

    jasdeep New Member

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    I have used eXtreme Outer Vision - eXtreme tools for computer enthusiasts - this google calculator...

    and after filling some of its feilds known to me.. it gives me recommended power-435 watts and minimum PSU watt-385watts...

    is this results fine???

    i am already using 460 watts PSU...

    If it is fine then whymy room lights keep fluctuating while i work on my pc...
     
    #3 jasdeep, Feb 12, 2012
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2012
  4. Mike

    Mike Windows Forum Admin
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    If the lights in your room are flickering, you have too much connected into one power outlet. If the LED on your computer is flickering it is your hard drive.

    Go to Start -> Search -> Resource Monitor to measure unusual OS activity.

    For overvolt and power supply concerns, consider using the BIOS to examine the electrical current going into the system. Do not make manual adjustments unless it is to load fail safes. If you continue to be concerned about physical PSU issues, you would want a PSU Tester.

    Generally speaking, the system will regulate the voltage to system specifications. The only time this will not happen is if you have a faulty PSU. Look for core voltage going to the CPU above 1.5V. This would generally be a sign of a misconfiguration in the BIOS or problem with the hardware.

    If the system suddenly shuts down, your BIOS will usually have a PC Health Log indicating if the system lost control over DC power. If that happens, replace the PSU first. The PSU can be suspect because it is one of the most likely parts on the computer to be faulty. Don't jump to conclusions, however, and examine all options. Compare your motherboard and processor specifications with the BIOS read-out. Consult the motherboard manual for this information.
     
    #4 Mike, Feb 12, 2012
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 12, 2012
  5. jasdeep

    jasdeep New Member

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    thanks Mike for your concern...
    and yes i have connected all the required connections for running pc(like speakers,ups) to the same socket. i will connect them to different socket as you suggested.

    and for rest of your guidance you have given to me...kindly elaborate your rest of steps in more easier way as i am not much into these technical things..

    it would be highly appreciated if you guide me step by step...
     
  6. Digerati

    Digerati Fantastic Member
    Microsoft MVP

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    More likely into one circuit, not one outlet. It is not likely your computer and all your peripherals are drawing more than 1500W from a single socket.

    Note in many rooms, all the wall outlets in that room are often tied to the same circuit and breaker. And so with power consuming devices connected to "sister" outlets, it is more likely to overload the circuit, not the wall outlet.

    I advise AGAINST plugging your computer (including speakers, monitors, printer, etc.) into different wall outlets. It is much better to have them all fed from the same outlet. This is because the resistance to ground (Earth) will be slightly different at each wall outlet (due to wire length, different connections, etc.). And those different grounds WILL result in a "difference of potential" which WILL cause current to flow between them when you interconnect the devices through the various data cables. Not good. At best, it can cause "noise" - ripple in the AC and/or actual buzzing from your speakers. At worst, it can cause a shock hazard if you touch components from each outlet at the same time.

    So it is much better to run all your computer devices from the same wall outlet. And certainly, as always, I recommend ALL computer be on a "good" UPS with AVR - automatic voltage regulation.

    I also recommend all home owners, renters, tenants, etc. have an AC Outlet Tester. I recommend one with a GFCI (ground fault circuit interrupt) indicator as it can be used to test bathroom and kitchen outlets too. These testers can be found for your type and voltage outlet, foreign or domestic, at most home improvement stores, or even the electrical department at Walmart.
     
  7. jasdeep

    jasdeep New Member

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    Hi,

    i am attaching my bios screenshot and dxdiag file for better understanding.

    Please tell me that should i connect all peripherals to same socket or not...

    and i am already using double battery good" UPS with AVR - automatic voltage regulation.

    can this flickering current sound coming from PSU harm my system???

    or is it PSU fault???

    Please provide me a good n permanent soluntion to this
     

    Attached Files:

  8. Mike

    Mike Windows Forum Admin
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    You will note that I never actually suggested he connect into a different outlet. But I would think that whatever he is using in his room is probably all on the same wall outlet (I got that one right!) and hence breaker and circuit. I'm not an electrician, but sometimes rooms can be designed whereas one side is on one circuit breaker and the other on a different one. I would imagine he has all of his equipment plugged into one or two surge protectors going into the same circuit as a lot of the other equipment in this room. I have never had a ground problem by moving equipment over to an outlet on another circuit. If you have your PSU connected into a single outlet and then move peripherals to a different one, and are using power strips, I don't see how this could be a problem. As long as there is a clean ground. But you have a point in that, I have an air purifier, hall lights, lamps, monitor, computer, external drive, 3x1000W PSU systems (2 of which are on UPS going into one outlet on the same circuit), a TV, all on the same circuit. If I turn on two air conditioners I wouldn't trip the breaker. I have seen one apartment where the entire place is on two circuits and using a microwave and an air conditioner at the same time will trip the breaker. How that even happens I have no idea.
     
    #8 Mike, Feb 13, 2012
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 13, 2012
  9. bassfisher6522

    bassfisher6522 Essential Member

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    When did this flickering start??? Before or after adding UPS...... Suggestion; unhook the UPS and start up PC and components as you would normally. I have a sneaky haunch that the UPS is some how the cause of this.



    After rereading your OP...I see that you said there is a clicking noise coming from the PSU. That's not normal and is probably a sign of the PSU going bad. The only recourse is to replace it.
     
  10. jasdeep

    jasdeep New Member

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    this flickering sound of current from UPS is not coming from begining..i am observing this from last few days...

    I still have some queries,

    1) Is it harmfull for my pc or PSU???

    NOTE:my PSU is connected to a double battery AVR UPS..

    I am using same power socket to run my big speakers with an Amplifier
    and UPS. And PSU,LCD monitor are connected to this UPS.

    2)So, do you suggest that i contact an eletrician and there is
    nothing wrong with PSU.????
     
  11. bassfisher6522

    bassfisher6522 Essential Member

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    You said this in your original post...

    "When i listen at the back of PSU, while my pc turned ON... A very low clicking sound is coming.."

    No sound should be coming from the PSU except for the noise the fan makes. If there is any other noise coming from the PSU other then the fan....there is something wrong with the PSU....that's need to be replaced.
     
  12. Digerati

    Digerati Fantastic Member
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    I know Mike. My response was to his comment about moving.

    As far as same room, most newer houses must have at least one outlet pair on at least 2 or 3 walls in the same room, though perhaps all on the same circuit. Each outlet must be rated for about 1800 watts (120VAC x 15amps = 1800) and that is much more than most computer systems (including speakers) will ever need. I note my computer, which has a 750W PSU, two 22 inch monitors, and all my network gear, rarely draws more than 500W as seen by my UPS display screen.

    And that's good. To be sure, I was talking about plugging the computer in one outlet, and say the speakers or monitors in a different outlet. They will be at slightly different ground levels, with the "common ground" being established via the interconnecting data cables. This is a common source of RFI/EMI problems.

    But note an outlet ground problem can occur by a simple loose screw in the outlet, a damaged outlet or wiring, or loose connection back at the service panel too.

    There are so many variables, there's no way of telling why. All breakers weaken with age. Breakers may be 15A, 20A, 25A. Old houses, new houses. Who knows. Not to mention every computer is different.

    What? To clarify, you meant PSU, right? I agree you should not be hearing any clicking sounds out of the PSU.

    And do note, UPS batteries need to be replaced about every 3 years. I plug two 150 watt lights into my UPS then pull the plug on the UPS. If the lights go out, you need new batteries. I would not call in an electrician yet. Get one of those Outlet Testers first -
     

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