How to make the system partition both boot and system (Windows 7 x64)

#1
Well,first of all I d like to congratulate the people who startd this forum.
It trully is a wealthy source of information on many many subjects! :)

My situation is as follows.
Windows 7 Ultimate x64 installed on a new drive I bought recently.Run setup from scratch.Re installed OS ( C: ).
Everything working ok till I noticed that I cannot format the partition that Windows 7 were originally installed ( W: ).
In Disk Management to my surprise I found out that W: is assigned as Boot and C: is System,both Active partitions.
Upon further investigation I followed this guide and when using the bcdedit /enum all /v command I get this:


Windows Boot Manager
--------------------
identifier {9dea862c-5cdd-4e70-acc1-f32b344d4795}
device boot
path \bootmgr
description Windows Boot Manager
locale en-us
inherit {7ea2e1ac-2e61-4728-aaa3-896d9d0a9f0e}
default {39db824c-0044-11e2-ae42-fb7e07222570}
resumeobject {39db824b-0044-11e2-ae42-fb7e07222570}
displayorder {39db824c-0044-11e2-ae42-fb7e07222570}
toolsdisplayorder {b2721d73-1db4-4c62-bf78-c548a880142d}
timeout 0
Windows Boot Loader
-------------------
identifier {39db8249-0044-11e2-ae42-fb7e07222570}
device ramdisk=[C:]\Recovery\39db8249-0044-11e2-ae42-fb7e072225
70\Winre.wim,{39db824a-0044-11e2-ae42-fb7e07222570}
path \windows\system32\winload.exe
description Windows Recovery Environment
inherit {6efb52bf-1766-41db-a6b3-0ee5eff72bd7}
osdevice ramdisk=[C:]\Recovery\39db8249-0044-11e2-ae42-fb7e072225
70\Winre.wim,{39db824a-0044-11e2-ae42-fb7e07222570}
systemroot \windows
nx OptIn
winpe Yes
custom:46000010 Yes
Windows Boot Loader
-------------------
identifier {39db824c-0044-11e2-ae42-fb7e07222570}
device partition=C:
path \windows\system32\winload.exe
description Windows 7
locale en-us
inherit {6efb52bf-1766-41db-a6b3-0ee5eff72bd7}
osdevice partition=C:
systemroot \windows
resumeobject {39db824b-0044-11e2-ae42-fb7e07222570}
nx OptIn
detecthal Yes
Windows Boot Loader
-------------------
identifier {3f53f540-64cc-11e0-b9ab-9ad00bd2edc5}
device partition=C:
path \windows\system32\winload.exe
description Windows Recovery Environment
inherit {6efb52bf-1766-41db-a6b3-0ee5eff72bd7}
osdevice ramdisk=[W:]\Recovery\3f53f540-64cc-11e0-b9ab-9ad00bd2ed
c5\Winre.wim,{3f53f541-64cc-11e0-b9ab-9ad00bd2edc5}
systemroot \windows
nx OptIn
winpe Yes
custom:46000010 Yes
Windows Boot Loader
-------------------
identifier {3f53f548-64cc-11e0-b9ab-9ad00bd2edc5}
device ramdisk=[W:]\Recovery\3f53f548-64cc-11e0-b9ab-9ad00bd2ed
c5\Winre.wim,{3f53f549-64cc-11e0-b9ab-9ad00bd2edc5}
path \windows\system32\winload.exe
description Windows Recovery Environment
locale en-US
inherit {6efb52bf-1766-41db-a6b3-0ee5eff72bd7}
custom:15000065 3
custom:15000066 3
osdevice ramdisk=[W:]\Recovery\3f53f548-64cc-11e0-b9ab-9ad00bd2ed
c5\Winre.wim,{3f53f549-64cc-11e0-b9ab-9ad00bd2edc5}
systemroot \windows
nx OptIn
custom:250000c2 1
winpe Yes
custom:46000010 Yes
Resume from Hibernate
---------------------
identifier {39db824b-0044-11e2-ae42-fb7e07222570}
device partition=C:
path \windows\system32\winresume.exe
description Windows Resume Application
locale en-us
inherit {1afa9c49-16ab-4a5c-901b-212802da9460}
filedevice partition=C:
filepath \hiberfil.sys
debugoptionenabled No
Resume from Hibernate
---------------------
identifier {4be53114-6ae5-11e1-bacb-806e6f6e6963}
device partition=C:
path \Windows\system32\winresume.exe
description Microsoft Windows 7
locale en-US
inherit {1afa9c49-16ab-4a5c-901b-212802da9460}
filedevice partition=W:
filepath \hiberfil.sys
debugoptionenabled No
Windows Memory Tester
---------------------
identifier {b2721d73-1db4-4c62-bf78-c548a880142d}
device boot
path \Boot\memtest.exe
description Windows Memory Diagnostic
locale en-us
inherit {7ea2e1ac-2e61-4728-aaa3-896d9d0a9f0e}
badmemoryaccess Yes
EMS Settings
------------
identifier {0ce4991b-e6b3-4b16-b23c-5e0d9250e5d9}
bootems Yes
Debugger Settings
-----------------
identifier {4636856e-540f-4170-a130-a84776f4c654}
debugtype Serial
debugport 1
baudrate 115200
RAM Defects
-----------
identifier {5189b25c-5558-4bf2-bca4-289b11bd29e2}
Global Settings
---------------
identifier {7ea2e1ac-2e61-4728-aaa3-896d9d0a9f0e}
inherit {4636856e-540f-4170-a130-a84776f4c654}
{0ce4991b-e6b3-4b16-b23c-5e0d9250e5d9}
{5189b25c-5558-4bf2-bca4-289b11bd29e2}
Boot Loader Settings
--------------------
identifier {6efb52bf-1766-41db-a6b3-0ee5eff72bd7}
inherit {7ea2e1ac-2e61-4728-aaa3-896d9d0a9f0e}
{7ff607e0-4395-11db-b0de-0800200c9a66}
Hypervisor Settings
-------------------
identifier {7ff607e0-4395-11db-b0de-0800200c9a66}
hypervisordebugtype Serial
hypervisordebugport 1
hypervisorbaudrate 115200
Resume Loader Settings
----------------------
identifier {1afa9c49-16ab-4a5c-901b-212802da9460}
device partition=C:
inherit {7ea2e1ac-2e61-4728-aaa3-896d9d0a9f0e}
Device options
--------------
identifier {39db824a-0044-11e2-ae42-fb7e07222570}
description Ramdisk Options
ramdisksdidevice partition=C:
ramdisksdipath \Recovery\39db8249-0044-11e2-ae42-fb7e07222570\boot.sdi
Device options
--------------
identifier {3f53f541-64cc-11e0-b9ab-9ad00bd2edc5}
device partition=C:
description Ramdisk Options
ramdisksdidevice partition=W:
ramdisksdipath \Recovery\3f53f540-64cc-11e0-b9ab-9ad00bd2edc5\boot.sdi
Device options
--------------
identifier {3f53f549-64cc-11e0-b9ab-9ad00bd2edc5}
device partition=C:
description Windows Recovery
ramdisksdidevice partition=W:
ramdisksdipath \Recovery\3f53f548-64cc-11e0-b9ab-9ad00bd2edc5\boot.sdi

I tried moving things to my C: drive succesfully,also run this command
Windows7DVD:\BOOT\BOOTSECT /NT60 C: /FORCE
and made sure the C: partition was active before rebooting.

I did reboot using the C: drive as boot drive in the BIOS menu but got an error message.

Disk Read Error Occurred on boot
Press CTRL+ALT+DEL to reboot.
Ok,I changed back to the initial settings and the PC loaded Windows normally.


After trying to use Neosmart's EasyBCD to "Change boot drive" and rebooted,
the same happened again.

So,my question is: What do I do to end this mess?!? Can you help me please?
I d like to format the W: drive and use the drive space for something else.
Thank you in advance.
N.

PS.I m running PRimo RAMDISK software but I dont think this has anything to do with the problem.I m just mentioning since I see a lot of ramdisks identifiers.
 


Saltgrass

Excellent Member
Microsoft Community Contributor
#2
Bootsect /nt60 if for changing from a WinXP to Windows 7 boot configuration. If you want to move the boot files, you need to use BCDboot.exe. But even that may leave you without the option for a recovery using the F8 key. So running a Startup Repair (3 times) usually replaces the files and gives you the recovery options, if an active partition is present.

I am not sure why W: is showing as boot, since it is the Recovery option and load the WinPE in a Ramdisk. You should only have one active partition on your system, and that would be the Windows 7 system partition where the boot files are. The Windows 7 OS partition should show as the boot partition. These may be the same partition if you set it up that way.

Could you post a picture of your Disk Management windows using the snipping tool and then attach using the paperclip? But it looks like you need to make sure the real system partition is active, then run Startup Repair 3 times.

Edit: The W: might be related to your Ramdisk software. You have extra entries that migbt be related. Running Startup Repair may clear out some of your extraneous BCD Store entries, but if it doesn't, you might shutdown the Ramdisk software until you get things straighteded out.
 


Last edited:
#4
I am not sure why W: is showing as boot, since it is the Recovery option and load the WinPE in a Ramdisk. You should only have one active partition on your system, and that would be the Windows 7 system partition where the boot files are. The Windows 7 OS partition should show as the boot partition. These may be the same partition if you set it up that way.

Could you post a picture of your Disk Management windows using the snipping tool and then attach using the paperclip? But it looks like you need to make sure the real system partition is active, then run Startup Repair 3 times.

Edit: The W: might be related to your Ramdisk software. You have extra entries that migbt be related. Running Startup Repair may clear out some of your extraneous BCD Store entries, but if it doesn't, you might shutdown the Ramdisk software until you get things straighteded out.
In windows 7 W: doesnt exist.
RAMDisk is showing up as drive A.
And it doesnt show up in Disk Management at all.

Here s the screenshot you asked for:
Capture.PNG


Ok,First of all,I ll disable RAMDISK.
After rebooting BCD changes accordingly?

Bootsect /nt60 if for changing from a WinXP to Windows 7 boot configuration. If you want to move the boot files, you need to use BCDboot.exe. But even that may leave you without the option for a recovery using the F8 key. So running a Startup Repair (3 times) usually replaces the files and gives you the recovery options, if an active partition is present.
Hm,maybe this command will do the trick?!?
bcdboot c:\Windows /s c: /l en-us
Of course running this from WinPE,booting from Win7 DVD.

It looks to me like the bootmgr is still on W. You apparently did not disconnect that disk when you installed Win7. Maybe this will do the trick: Bootmgr - Move to C:\ with EasyBCD - Windows 7 Forums
No,unfortunately I didnt disconnet the drive.Thats why I m into this mess.
EasyBCD program didnt do the trick.
Lots of information on that thread but a bit confusing for my case.
Maybe a bit of explaining of what steps I need to go through?


N.
 


Saltgrass

Excellent Member
Microsoft Community Contributor
#5
I really needed the graphical representation of the drives and partitions. It should look like the attachment, but not the EFI part...

You show 3 active partitions and there can only be one per drive, so I assume you have three hard drives, or two hard drives and a Ramdrive?

According the the BCD printout, the W: is a Ramdrive, which you need to get rid of. If you are getting info while booted into the WinPE, I am not familiar with how it might look. The C: partition shows as active, so you might look for hidden system files and see if the boot folder is located there. If it is, you would not need to run the bcdboot command.

You should not need the language switch in the bcdboot command.

Have you run a Startup Repair from the Install DVD?
 


Attachments

#6
Have you run a Startup Repair from the Install DVD?
Many many many times to no avail,no matter what options I choose.

I really needed the graphical representation of the drives and partitions. It should look like the attachment, but not the EFI part...
Capture.PNG

So,as you can see W is marked as system partition even though no OS files present
and C is marked as boot even though all the OS files are on it.Thats a Microsoft
known naming mess though,I know.Fact is that both drives have a folder named BOOT
with all the necessary files for booting in them.Problem is that when I choose to
boot from my Hybrid SSD where C is on,I still get the message
"Disk Read Error Occurred on boot Press CTRL+ALT+DEL to reboot.".

I m beginning to think that this is indeed a BIOS settings problem.

My BIOS picks up both disks during POST.
Sata configuration is as follows:
SATA Channel : Enabled.
Sata 1-4 : AHCI.
Sata 5-6 : IDE.
(The ASUS manual states that setting the last on to IDE instead of AHCI allows the
system to recognise the optical drives connected to SATA ports 5/6 when installing OS)

If I change all to AHCI there s no boot at all.
BIOS doesn't even pick up my Primary IDE drive (W) anymore.

Also with my current configuration when I enter the BIOS menu,
under the DISKS Tab (called something like that anyway) I can only
"see" the Primary IDE and one of my SATAs but NOT the Hybrid SSD.
All the disks show up afterwards though.in a separate page, just
before the system loads Windows Welcome screen.

So,maybe it all has to do with changing the SATA port I have the HybridSSD
connected to in order to make the BIOS pick it up first? Maybe Port 5/6?
Will changing the port affect my Windows drive letters or anything it shouldn't?
I cant seem to think of another solution right now.
N.
 


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Saltgrass

Excellent Member
Microsoft Community Contributor
#7
I don't think setting ports 5/6 to IDE is essential, but if you give me your motherboard model, I will check. If those ports are handled by a different SATA controller, it may not be loading until later in the boot. If you install an OS using the SATA controller set to ACHI, it will not run using IDE. Any SSD needs to use the AHCI controller.

Can you disconnect all other drives except the one Windows is on and see if it will boot? Put your Hybrid drive on SATA port 1.If it won't, run a Startup Repair, which is a specific procedure, not just a general term...

I don't have any experience with Hybrid drives. But the SSD portion is around 160 G?

But WHS is correct, your system is booting to the W: partition, which means that active partition is first in the drive priority list. I suppose if the SSD is not showing up in the bios, you can't really set it first, which is what needs to be done. You could also use Diskpart to remove the Active status from the non-booting partitions.

You will have to settle your drive letter situation later, you just need to get the system working, or leave it like it is. And you will not be able to format the W: partition until it is no longer involved in the boot, and maybe even if it shows active.
 


#8
First of all I really thank you Saltgrass,for your time and replies.
My motherboard is an ASUS M4A88T-V EVO/USB3.
It has a separate controller for SATA ports 5/6 in order to give you the option to make
them IDE under SATA config menu and let you install an OS via an optical SATA drive.
Thats all I know as far as this is concerned.

Well,to tell you the truth I just rearranged the HDDs using my motherboards SATA ports
and still nothing.In fact,I can boot from every other HDD (In my pursuit of solving this mystery
I've used a prompt command to copy BOOT files to them.I just do not remember the exact command right now),
but not from this Hybrid SSD drive which oddly enough has the Windows 7 system files still on it.

Take a look at these BIOS screens I took.

Here you can see how there are different prefixes the BIOS uses for the HDDs.
I ve since,moved them around so that the SSD (ST9500) got the prefix HDD and then SATA.
Both times the system returned with a DISK READ ERROR.
DSC_0114.jpg

This photo shows the only IDE drive I have installed plus the SATA CDROM
and whichever HDD is on SATA6 (same channel).
Even when mounting the SSD as SATA6 I couldn't get anything more than the same
DISK READ ERROR during POST.
DSC_0115.jpg

Well,for my sanity,I ll leave the whole problem as it is.
It s really only a problem of not formatting the infamous W partition.
I still can delete my old Windows 7 system files and use the partition as storage.
N.




 


Saltgrass

Excellent Member
Microsoft Community Contributor
#9
Have you updated the motherboard's Bios lately? Not saying you need to, just asking.

The manual does say to set 5/6 to IDE to use optical media during an install. It seems to mean the Bios does not have native AHCI controller driver so they will not function until the driver is loaded during the install. I run my optical off one of the basic Intel SATA II connectors and it runs fine during installs--maybe just your board is a little older.

I can't seem to find the specs on your Hybrid drive, except that it is a 500 GB drive. I was looking to see how large the SSD part was, since they are normally around 64 GB (possibly only 4 GB on that drive). Are you aware of any special drivers needed for that drive? It doesn't seem to be much different that a normal SATA II drive?

Also, since the board has an actual IDE connector, that always seems to have priority. My last board with one of those used the connector for an IDE optical drive. Then the Hard Drives were all on the same level.

But again, I would disconnect all drives except the Windows 7 install. Get the system running with the one drive, then reconnect the others while testing.
 


#10
Thanks again for your reply.
The solution you recommend
seems logical and believe me,
that's what I ll do next time I ll
install my OS.For now I ll leave it as it is.
The Seagate doesn't need any special drivers.
At least I don't think so.To my knowledge its plug n play.
Windows 8 are next soon for me.
Thanks again for your time!
N.
 


Last edited:
#11
It trully is a wealthy source of information on many many subjects!
 


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