Windows 11 Instal win 11 on none compatible laptop

mishlomo

New Member
Hi to everyone
i successfully installed windows 11 on my hp probook 14 with intel i5 which the Microsoft test fale
with comment the processors not compatible
it 5 years old laptop
 

mishlomo

New Member
I hade no problem to wait for the oroginal release of win 11 but as i heard it makes some test to find if the pc is ready for win 11 and you might be forced to bay a new pc/laptop
it seems in the version i install you can override this
 

mishlomo

New Member
I found on u tube how to make win 11 to be install on non supported laptop
by replacing files from win 10 to win 11
any one interested should check that installing win 11 on unsupported hardware
 

Wynona

New Member
Apart from the "leaked" windows 11, I would be grateful if you guys could tell me from what legitimate source you are downloading Windows 11, as I am anxious to try it.
Dave, I'm on the Insider DEV Channel for Windows 10, and (I think) Sunday when I checked for updates, it gave me Windows 11. I was kinda surprised and shocked, because I had no idea . . .

I checked my HP Intel Lappy, and it said it could run Windows 11, so I joined it to Insider DEV Channel, and waited awhile to check for updates. I'm now running Windows 11 on it too.

I gotta say this is about the weirdest Update I've ever seen. At first, I was so shocked, I almost did a clean install, but as I dig deeper, I'm not seeing all that much change, except for the userX. Which sux!
 

Mike

Windows Forum Admin
Staff member
Premium Supporter
Dave, I'm on the Insider DEV Channel for Windows 10, and (I think) Sunday when I checked for updates, it gave me Windows 11. I was kinda surprised and shocked, because I had no idea . . .

I checked my HP Intel Lappy, and it said it could run Windows 11, so I joined it to Insider DEV Channel, and waited awhile to check for updates. I'm now running Windows 11 on it too.

I gotta say this is about the weirdest Update I've ever seen. At first, I was so shocked, I almost did a clean install, but as I dig deeper, I'm not seeing all that much change, except for the userX. Which sux!
Apparently there have been optimizations to the kernel since late 2019 as 21H2 on the Dev Channel, the UI/taskbar was brought in from the cancelled Windows 10X and is (speculated to be) modular. So they can patch the UI as an Experience Update and do kernel/build updates separately. Thus, some are claiming the build itself is RTM, but I think this remains to be seen if that's truly the case.
 
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Wynona

New Member
Apparently there have been optimizations to the kernel since late 2019 as 21H2 on the Dev Channel, the UI/taskbar was brought in from the cancelled Windows 10X and is (speculated to be) modular. So they can patch the UI as an Experience Update and do kernel/build updates separately. Thus, some are claiming the build itself is RTM, but I think this remains to be seen if that's truly the case.
No, this is clearly marked as an Insider Preview. It is not RTM. That should come sometime near the end of 2021 or first part of 2022.

I don't think Microsoft is going to make the same mistake with Windows 11 that it did with Windows 8! :)
 

davehc

Essential Member
Premium Supporter
You have all looked at the many tweaks on the web, to install windows 11 on an incompatible computer. I tried them all and none worked for me.
Now a forum has come up with an automated process to make the necessary alterations to the registry.
I tried the tweak on an old i5 Dell laptop, with TPM 1.2. The tweak worked! I was using the leaked Windows 11 on a USB plug.

It took about 45 minutes on my crappy machine, but you may do better. On completion, all my data was intact and I was ready to go.
I could post the registry tweak, but would prefer you to go to the source, as I am a contributor there and do not want to incur their wrath.
PLEASE. Make a backup of your installation before trying this!!!!!!!

Download Bypass Secure Boot and Trusted Platform Module - MajorGeeks

Bypass Secure Boot and Trusted Platform Module contains the registry files to add one new Registry Key and three new Registry DWORD's to bypass Secure boot and TPM requirements and install Windows 11.
www.majorgeeks.com
 
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davehc

Essential Member
Premium Supporter
Been there, done that! Always the cynic. I just don't get it! I quickly put the start menu back where it belonged and adjusted one or two items so that the navigation was, essentially, more familiar to me.

Can't see anything new. The performance "seems" about the same. A lot of cosmetic changes with icons etc. Other than that -- whats new? I fail to see why this could not have come as an update to Windows 10, without the tom snd secure boot crap (to me, just put in as an obstacle to impress)
 

bochane

Excellent Member
As I see it, is the most important reason for W11 enhanced security which could not be implemented in the current version.
Why o why would somebody install obscure patches to bypassing this enhancements and start which an inherent unstable system?
 
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davehc

Essential Member
Premium Supporter
If it was built in ( tpm and secure boot) I would half agree with you. As it stands, it is a manual task which the user must organise before windows 11 will accept the install. (Quote: W11 enhanced security which could not be implemented in the current version.) In many computers, the capability is sitting in the bios, waiting to be implemented. This simple task is not a function of Windows 10 or any OS - it can certainly be activated in in Windows 10 - it is a user selected option. I consider regard to security, is my affair, and not that of Microsoft.
 
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davehc

Essential Member
Premium Supporter
Agreed. No argument here. But it can also be strong advise, more than a mandatory requirement. How many users have we seen on forums, for example, requesting methods to shut off the defender and or updates, which include definitions for defender
 

Neemobeer

Application and Cloud Security Engineer
Staff member
As a security engineer it makes me cringe every time. It's about the simplest thing someone can do to protect themselves and everyone else on the internet.
 

bochane

Excellent Member
Leaving out older processors is also enhancing security, is not it?
And yes, why not introducing these options gradually in W10, was not W10 introduced as the last version of Windows?.....

Added:
And sorry, of course we want to test on a second, hardly used, computer, but I want keep it far away from my daily used laptop.
 
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Mike

Windows Forum Admin
Staff member
Premium Supporter
Leaving out older processors is also enhancing security, is not it?
Yes but it also serves a business purpose so I think it is debatable to how much security it serves. With past CPU exploits you could just patch the CPU microcode and thats the end of that problem (Meltdown+Spectre). I don't see how locking out all CPUs prior to a certain generation ensures security.
 

Neemobeer

Application and Cloud Security Engineer
Staff member
Micro code patching is done like any other patching. Who knows why they won't support them. If I had to guess I would say Microsoft was looking for a certain level of performance. Gen 8 has significant performance gains over gen 7 CPUs
 
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