Installed new motherboard and can't boot windows.

Discussion in 'Windows 7 Hardware' started by reffu, Jan 7, 2010.

  1. reffu

    reffu New Member

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    I recently installed a new MB and I keep getting the bsod stop error 0x7b. I understand this is because my new motherboard has a different chipset. I have tried running a startup repair and chkdsk neither of which helped. I was wondering if there is any way besides a clean install to fix the error. I can't run an upgrade install because I can't boot windows and safe mode gives me the same blue screen. I have the installation dvd and a linux partition. Are there any command line commands or linux programs that would allow me to uninstall the motherboard drivers in windows and boot into it so i can run an upgrade install.

    Thanks,

    Reffu

    P.S. sorry if this isn't the right section to post this
     
  2. cybercore

    cybercore New Member

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  3. kemical

    kemical Windows Forum Admin
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    I'dd also check to see if your bios needs updating as they don't always come with the latest bios installed..
     
  4. Digerati

    Digerati Fantastic Member
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    It sounds like you are upgrading your computer by installing a new motherboard in your case, and booting from the old hard drive with a previous installation of Windows. Is that right?

    What type of Windows installation disk do you have? Is it an OEM version that came with your old computer? Or a retail version that you bought at a store?
     
  5. Digerati

    Digerati Fantastic Member
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    Actually, in most cases, if the motherboard is changed, and it is not an identical replacement board for one that has failed, and it is not an official "retail" license of Windows, a new Windows license MUST be purchased, as a new motherboard is considered a new computer!

    See, Microsoft Knowledge Base Article 824125 and note near the bottom where it says,
    I know that is counter to what many have believed, but it has always been this way - read your EULAs. OEM licenses are for just that "Original Equipment". It is important to note too the OEM versions are sold at a substantial discount. If transferability is important, buy a retail version.
     
  6. Digerati

    Digerati Fantastic Member
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    In the past they were pretty lenient. But now that more and more users are building and rebuilding their own, some have been rolling over these OEM licenses multiple times, and some times onto multiple machines. So the software companies (not just MS) started cracking down. Unfortunately, illegal copies of software is a major source of malware too. So in an effort to ensure "Genuine Versions" only are being used, and used properly, the software companies are closing all the loopholes to help stop illegal use of licenses and to improve security. No harm in calling in asking, as long as they are told the truth. If the new motherboard is an upgrade, and not an exact replacement for one that died, then that's what MS needs to be told. Who knows, they might feel generous.
     
  7. Ryan Hell

    Ryan Hell Banned

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    not true. You are wrong. If you install a new mobo it will not require you to purchase a new license. They havent done that since XP.
     
  8. kemical

    kemical Windows Forum Admin
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    Digerati was referring to OEM licence. A new motherboard will invalidate the licence as will changing the CPU more than twice. (if I remember correctly)
    I had an OEM copy of vista and had to change the motherboard resulting in the os asking for re-activation. I did this by using the telephone method and was given a new key.
     
  9. Digerati

    Digerati Fantastic Member
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    :( Obviously, you didn't bother to read and comprehend what I said before replying, or what Microsoft CLEARLY stated in my quote above, or the included link. :frown:

    What you fail to state, and apparently don't understand is what "it" is. The OEM installation disk and install process may not require you to purchase a new license, but the License Agreement (EULA) CLEARLY does! And it is important to comprehend that you, the user, agreed to the terms of the EULA when you start using a computer that has an OEM license tied to it! - as virtually every factory made computer does! And, for the purpose of this thread, the terms of the agreement include those stipulations for motherboard replacements that I quoted above - I emphasize "quoted" because it is NOT my opinion, but the facts.

    That's how the OEM process works, and the law supports it. Now if you upgrade your motherboard and are forced to contact MS for a new key, whether they give you one or not is neither here nor there. The License Agreement clearly states,

    (1) the OEM license cannot be transfered to a new computer
    and it further states,
    (2) An upgrade or a replacement of the motherboard is considered to create a new personal computer.

    Period! Not my opinion - just the published facts. If you don't like the terms of the OEM agreements, buy a Retail version.

    Also not my opinion is the fact you don't own your copy of Windows. You own a license to use Windows in accordance with the terms of the license agreement. Whether you decide to cheat the system and violate the terms of the agreement because you can get away with it is between you and your moral conscience. But understand, if you are upgrading a motherboard, and the old is not defective, and you don't tell MS the truth or allow them to believe otherwise, that is called deception for personal gain. It is a "fraudulent act"! IF Microsoft decided to pursue it in a court of law, you would lose and be found guilty of theft by fraud or deception, a felony, with substantial fines and possible jail time! While it is unlikely MS would pursue it, they can, just as the music and movie industries have gone after individuals (and won!) for violating copyright laws for tunes and videos.

    So it is you, Ryan, who are wrong, and I showed proof. You are wrong because your facts are wrong, and you are wrong because you jumped into the thread without knowing the facts.

    If you can find proof (documentation) from a legitimate Microsoft source that supports your claims, I will be happy to review it. And if it does conflict with other Microsoft documents, your OEM EULA, or what I referenced above, then I will take it to my MS contacts (my MS MVP team leader is a VP at MS) and ask them to fix the inconsistencies, one way or the other.

    In the meantime, before jumping into a thread claiming someone is wrong again, do your homework and get the facts first! Please read carefully what people are saying, and follow any included links - they are included for a purpose - to substantiate the facts presented, and to clear up and avoid confusion - and to [hopefully] prevent future foot-in-mouth disorders. ;) Providing evidence is especially important when you counter a staff member of this site. This is because when we agreed to join the staff, we assumed an obligation and the responsibility to present to our readers the true facts. We can, and certainly I have been wrong before, and will be wrong again - but that's where you need to show where by presenting supporting or substantiating evidence - as in links to reputable sources.

    Note I also said above,
    But let me emphasize again, read your EULAs!

    @kemical Actually, there's no limit on CPUs (except as limited by the motherboard/chipset) but there are limits to the number of hardware changes that can occur before the re-authentication process is triggered. The re-authentication can usually be done on-line, or as you noted, over the phone. The motherboard, as its name suggest, is the primary focus.
     
  10. Ryan Hell

    Ryan Hell Banned

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    Well I install OEM copies of Vista and WIn 7 all the time without any issues whent he customer returns to have motherboards changed, cpu's etc. I personally owned a OEM Vista x64 and I swapped mobo's and cpu's almost weekly, with no issues ever. What country are you guys in? Maybe its a regional issue you are speaking of, lol.
     
  11. Digerati

    Digerati Fantastic Member
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    You still are not reading what is being said, are you? I NEVER said it can't be done. I said it is NOT legal to do it! READ YOUR EULA!!!!!

    If you are doing this for clients, and you are taking their money - you are, technically, conspiring with the owner to commit fraud!!!! That makes you equally guilty and liable - if not more so because you, as the professional, should know better. That is not my opinion but the facts. I am just the messenger here.

    It is my opinion, however, that you need to stop now! If a client wants you to swap motherboards, you need to insist they bring in their EULAs or their "original" Windows installation disk. If it is not a "retail version" and this is not to replace a broken motherboard, then your civic and professional duty is to educate your client to the law and have them buy a new license.

    Note it does not matter what country you are in. If your country is a member of the United Nations and/or the EU, your country has agreed to abide by a uniform set of copyright and patent protection laws and UN charters that govern these things.
     
  12. Ryan Hell

    Ryan Hell Banned

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    I could care less about MS's arcane EULA. Its something that I have no time for and MS has never hastled me since 1993 when I started my business. I have a good idea that MS is busy with other stuff so please spare me the LAME argument about frivious technicalities that are not even enforced in the enterprise level which I am not. I would like to point out that if you are scared of such proclamtions made by MS I imagine your shop (if indeed you own one, lol!) is pretty quiet these days. I am a MS certified partner,I worked for MS for 3 years, and I can tell you from experience some things are just ignored. technicians have more important things to worry about. You should learn more about the software itself and not the bloated EULA which has the substance of bran IMO. By the way good luck turning me in. Anyhow, I think of your "business" and I imagine you eagerly awaiting customers to call, for weeks on end. LOL.Business bad? Stop worrying about the EULA when it comes to rebuilding a PC for goodness sakes. Oh have you ever installed Win on a business machine? THATS probably a violation of the standard license as well. Better watch out or they will come to Nebraska and take your , cough, computer. I grew up in Microsoft. i started doing work for them in the 1990's in high school. So take your "watch out" story elsewhere. Dont be a patsy. Is this what i have to put up with at thsi site? Wow its pretty useless. i ask for help and I get over posters trying to meet quotas, and now this. Save it. I will gladly move on. oh, gotta run! take care
     
  13. Digerati

    Digerati Fantastic Member
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    I suppose you roll through stop signs and red lights too, since those are mostly ignored these day. Oh well, that just leads to your character, not mine. I personally don't break the laws just because I can get away with it.

    Now's who's paranoid? I have no intentions of doing that. If the software police want to go after you, they can do that with a court order to site admin, not me.

    As I said above, I am just the messenger. If you want to heed the warning, that's great. If not, and you get caught, don't claim you didn't know.
     
  14. kemical

    kemical Windows Forum Admin
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    Yes that's true but after changing the CPU twice you have re-activate.. I should have been clearer..
     
  15. kemical

    kemical Windows Forum Admin
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    I'm not sure who closed the thread but this is not how we do things here. To close a thread and save confusion, valid reasons must be given as well as a post explaining why it was closed and who closed it. Otherwise the thread in question will be opened again by someone else...
     
  16. Digerati

    Digerati Fantastic Member
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    Thank you. It is now re-opened.

    @reffu - sorry for the distractions. Obviously, the use of OEM software on other than the "original" hardware is a controversial topic. What you do is your business but it is the business of this Moderator to make sure users know the truth, and the laws, and whatever other information they need to make the right decision.

    Ah, not sure I knew how many times. Thanks. The problem I have is by the time I get around to upgrading a CPU, I have already added RAM, perhaps a bigger drive, and a bigger graphics card too. In other words, several HW changes, never really knowing which change triggered the re-activate notice.
     

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