Is there a way to install an old program which works on Win7 32-bit onto Win7 64-bit?

pvanc

Honorable Member
#1
Hello,

I have an old DOS cookbook program which contains all my old recipes from many years. I have it installed on my Windows 7 32-bit system and would like to put it on my laptop for use on the road. Laptop is Windows 7 64-bit and I get a message that it is not compatible. Is there a workaround so I can use that program on the 64-bit system? I tried choosing the compatibility to work with Windows XP 3 but still get that incompatible message.
Thanks.
 


Joe S

Excellent Member
#2
It may be a 16 bit installer that won't work in Windows 7 64 bit. I have an old bike log program that I got when I had W98. I did some looking and it didn't appear to have any drivers. So I copied the the entire file with sub folders to W7 then went in and double clicked the one registry file. I only had to use the activation code again. I figured out where to change that later. If you are using 2 different PC Windows easy transfer may work better.
Joe
 


catilley1092

Extraordinary Member
#3
pvanc, which version of Windows 7 are you using? If you're running Pro or Ultimate, you can download & install Windows Virtual PC with XP Mode for free. It's the solution to get many software that ran on XP running on Windows 7. Plus older printers that 7 won't support will run on XP Mode.

There's been many members of several forums that has thousands of dollars worth of software & hardware, and XP Mode saved the day. Running VM's can be a little tricky at first, but after a few days, it's usually a piece of cake.

Cat
 


winoutreach5

New Member
Microsoft
#4
There are two ways you can run Microsoft DOS applications specific to a legacy operating system in conjunction with Windows 7 64-bit. The first method is to create a dual boot, or multiboot configuration between Microsoft Windows XP and Windows 7 providing you have a valid license for Windows XP. The first step in this process is to ensure you have a separate location for each operating system you intend to use. In this scenario you will want to have one partition for Windows 7 and a second, separate, partition for Microsoft Windows XP Professional. Just as an added tool, Microsoft has a helpful video of how this process is performed here. Another great resource is the multiboot step-by-step guide Install more than one operating system (multiboot.)

However, with that said, perhaps the easiest way to run Microsoft Windows XP within Windows7 is through Windows XP Mode and Virtual PC just as Catilley1092 pointed out. Windows XP Mode and Windows Virtual PC, available on Windows 7 Professional, Windows 7 Enterprise and Windows 7 Ultimate, allow you to run multiple Windows environments, such as Windows XP Mode, from your Windows 7 desktop. A great video to demonstrate this can be found on the TechNet site here. For those who do are not currently running Windows 7 Professional, Windows 7 Enterprise, or Windows 7 Ultimate, there is an easy upgrade path to Windows 7 Professional or Windows 7 Ultimate through the Windows Anytime Upgrade program.

Please note that Windows XP Mode is a virtualized environment and is not recommended for graphically intense applications. If utilizing Windows XP is contingent upon the use of a graphically intense piece of software, it would be advisable to consider the previously mentioned dual boot environment as a more successful path.
 


catilley1092

Extraordinary Member
#5
Jessica, on one of my hard drives, this is the way it's setup. A Tri-Boot of XP Media Center, Windows 7 Pro x64 & Ubuntu 11.10. I only have XP Mode for trying out software & helping out others with XP Mode. Honestly, I don't need it for anything. I have most every version of XP installed somewhere, including the 64 bit edition. Just not the tablet edition.

And yes, the graphics are terrible. But it has the potential to help many in their moving forward to Windows 7. Like if one needs time to buy a printer, or it's otherwise good & needs it to print an document when needed.

Cat
 


helpifIcan

Extraordinary Member
#6
Look for a program called DOSBOX, I have not used it a long time and I am not even sure it works on WIN7, BUT it was designed to run old DOS games. It may work for you with this old program.
 


pvanc

Honorable Member
#7
Cat,
Maybe you can help me achieve my goal. I have Windows 7 Ultimate 64-bit software to install and in trying to upgrade install it over Windows 7 Home Premium on my 64-bit laptop I get to the point of the program doing a compatibility report and it says it puts it on the desktop. The report is blank and I don't have any compatibility problem since I have already been running Windows 7. How do I bypass that compatibility report and get on with the upgrade installation? The only choice I have at the compatibility report window is 'close' which ends the installation. Please respond so I can get on with my installation. Thanks, pvanc

pvanc, which version of Windows 7 are you using? If you're running Pro or Ultimate, you can download & install Windows Virtual PC with XP Mode for free. It's the solution to get many software that ran on XP running on Windows 7. Plus older printers that 7 won't support will run on XP Mode.

There's been many members of several forums that has thousands of dollars worth of software & hardware, and XP Mode saved the day. Running VM's can be a little tricky at first, but after a few days, it's usually a piece of cake.

Cat
 


catilley1092

Extraordinary Member
#8
Cat,
Maybe you can help me achieve my goal. I have Windows 7 Ultimate 64-bit software to install and in trying to upgrade install it over Windows 7 Home Premium on my 64-bit laptop I get to the point of the program doing a compatibility report and it says it puts it on the desktop. The report is blank and I don't have any compatibility problem since I have already been running Windows 7. How do I bypass that compatibility report and get on with the upgrade installation? The only choice I have at the compatibility report window is 'close' which ends the installation. Please respond so I can get on with my installation. Thanks, pvanc
pvanc, I've never done an upgrade install, other than the Windows Anytime Upgrade, which involved only entering a key, some updating was done. After reboot, I had a desktop that said "Windows 7 Professional", rather than "Home Premium".

I'll tell you what you may be able to do. It should work as long as MS recognizes the key, if not, no harm done.

Go to the Start Menu, enter "Windows Anytime Upgrade", w/o the quotes. There are 2 options, you can go to the Microsoft Store & purchase a key, or you can enter a key that you've purchased. Select the option to enter the key that you've purchased, making sure that you double check what you're entering.

It will take a minute or so (usually less) to validate the key, if successful, the upgrade will proceed, if not, an error will show. Try entering the key & see what happens. This is the program that you should have bought in the first place, is the Windows Anytime Upgrade. No need to reinstall Windows 7 over Windows 7. The key simply unlocks the features of the desired version.

But try entering that key & see what happens first, all may be fine.

Cat
 


#9
Cat, this same query is in another thread, where I answered it a few minutes ago.

And many 32-bit items can run on x64 just not the other way around.

Drew
 


catilley1092

Extraordinary Member
#10
Cat, this same query is in another thread, where I answered it a few minutes ago.

And many 32-bit items can run on x64 just not the other way around.

Drew
If I'm not mistaken, the member who asked me for assistance was wanting to know how to upgrade the install from Home Premium to Ultimate. If I've misread this, may the member who asked for my opinion please speak up, as this was my understanding of the post. This post involves an upgrade install, if it's read carefully.

I hope that my understanding was correct & if so, the key works fine. If not, please post back. There may be other members able to help. My instructions are the only way that I know of to upgrade one version of Windows 7 to another.

EDIT: I didn't see the other thread, there are many on here.

Cat
 


pvanc

Honorable Member
#11
Cat,

I inserted my key and it upgraded to Ultimate just fine. I am the one Drew is speaking of as I had another question about installing an old DOS program onto a Win 7 64-bit system. That is why I wanted to upgrade to Ultimate since I knew I could run in XP mode and my old program would work in XP.

Thanks for your help!!

pvanc

If I'm not mistaken, the member who asked me for assistance was wanting to know how to upgrade the install from Home Premium to Ultimate. If I've misread this, may the member who asked for my opinion please speak up, as this was my understanding of the post. This post involves an upgrade install, if it's read carefully.

I hope that my understanding was correct & if so, the key works fine. If not, please post back. There may be other members able to help. My instructions are the only way that I know of to upgrade one version of Windows 7 to another.

EDIT: I didn't see the other thread, there are many on here.

Cat
 


#12
I meant his question about upgrading to Ultimate. That, was asked in 2 places. You didn't misread, anything. :) Don't know why it was put in 2 threads. Guess, like you, I had just seen the other one 1st. No worries.

Drew
 


catilley1092

Extraordinary Member
#13
Cat,

I inserted my key and it upgraded to Ultimate just fine. I am the one Drew is speaking of as I had another question about installing an old DOS program onto a Win 7 64-bit system. That is why I wanted to upgrade to Ultimate since I knew I could run in XP mode and my old program would work in XP.

Thanks for your help!!

pvanc
Glad to hear that the key worked fine. Enjoy Windows 7 Ultimate!


Remember, now that you've applied that key, it's only good on the computer on which it's installed. If you have a re-install disk, or a hotkey option to reinstall, use that. After updating, then re-enter your key again, the install will upgrade as before.

BTW, now is a great time to backup your computer, a full image of the drive.


Cat
 


Last edited:

pvanc

Honorable Member
#14
Just an update....I tried the Virtual Windows XP and could not get it to work with the old DOS cookbook. So I finally installed DosBox on my Windows 7 Ultimate 64-bit laptop. Carefully followed the commands and lo and behold I now have access to my cookbook on the 64-bit computer. Perfect....thanks pvanc

Look for a program called DOSBOX, I have not used it a long time and I am not even sure it works on WIN7, BUT it was designed to run old DOS games. It may work for you with this old program.
 


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