Licensing question

SaleB

New Member
Long story short, I am building a NAS device for which I have thought to use Linux, but after an few month excursion into Linux world I do not think it to be such a good idea anymore. It will be a Snapraid solution so I am free to choose if the system will run Windows or Linux solution.

I actually never had a license for windows. Seven was a volume license, that worked flawlessly but while being genuine was not registered to my name. The question is for the W10. How does Microsoft bind a specific retail license to a machine?

I read that the license is connected to one PC, but it's to vague an explanation. I build my systems and never do the whole system. For example, two years ago I changed the core set, motherboard, cpu, 16GB ram. Ten months ago the SSD started dying after three years so I installed a fresh OS on a new NVMe drive. Then, three months ago I changed an older graphics adapter to a better one. Then, a few weeks ago I added 32gb ram. Now, I will in a few days remove 16GB ram, because while 16 is clearly not enough for my use case 48 is an unnecessary overkill. So, my config is always in flux, changing, evolving, in last 15 years there has never been a new computer in a sense most users think of it.

How would a retail license interfere with that and how long can I expect it to last until I have to buy another license key?

I know that some software packages bind to primary NIC MAC address, some to primary disk UUID, some to combination of those, but I could nowhere find to what component or what set of components does W10 license bind itself.
 

livix07

Well-Known Member
Long story short, I am building a NAS device for which I have thought to use Linux, but after an few month excursion into Linux world I do not think it to be such a good idea anymore.
Linux is a very good solution for File Sharing. Did you ask for help with Linux?
You can use either SAMBA OR MySecureShell SFTP server. I have even published a book on MySecureShell server.

I read that the license is connected to one PC, but it's to vague an explanation.
...
How would a retail license interfere with that and how long can I expect it to last until I have to buy another license key?
RETAIL license can be used on any computer at a time. It doesn't matter if you change the hardware.
OEM licence is tied to hardware.

Here is a short excerpt from Windows 10 licence agreement (Retail is "Stand-alone", OEM is "preinstalled"):
4. Transfer. The provisions of this section do not apply if you acquired the software in Germany or in any of the countries listed on this site (aka.ms/transfer), in which case any transfer of the software to a third party, and the right to use it, must comply with applicable law.

a. Software preinstalled on device. If you acquired the software preinstalled on a device (and also if you upgraded from software preinstalled on a device), you may transfer the license to use the software directly to another user, only with the licensed device. The transfer must include the software and, if provided with the device, an authentic Windows label including the product key. Before any permitted transfer, the other party must agree that this agreement applies to the transfer and use of the software.

b. Stand-alone software. If you acquired the software as stand-alone software (and also if you upgraded from software you acquired as stand-alone software), you may transfer the software to another device that belongs to you. You may also transfer the software to a device owned by someone else if (i) you are the first licensed user of the software and (ii) the new user agrees to the terms of this agreement. You may use the backup copy we allow you to make or the media that the software came on to transfer the software. Every time you transfer the software to a new device, you must remove the software from the prior device. You may not transfer the software to share licenses between devices
You can read the full licence agreement here:
Microsoft License Terms
 
Last edited:

SaleB

New Member
Thanks. Yes, the jury is still out on the Linux question. As a short term desktop environment I have used Manjaro and was happy with it, but as a rolling release its not ideal for a server. Ubuntu I do not like in recent few versions, seems a bit bloated, so I'll probably try Debian or some other Debian-based distro (Mint perhaps) before I finally choose. I run a few copies of Linuxes in VM on my primary machine, would not say that I am a power user, but I know my way around the command line and the few things that I use frequently.

So, about the W license, in other words a retail version is legal as long as there is only one active copy at one point in time on a computer that belongs to the first license owner, no matter the configuration changes as the time passes. That's what I wanted to know, thanks.
 

nmsuk

Windows Forum Admin
Staff member
Premium Supporter
Why not install ubuntu server and only add the desktop parts required.
 

SaleB

New Member
I am actually astound that it did not think of that, every version I installed in last few years, virtual or real was Ubuntu Desktop LTS. I newer stopped to think if there are differences, since they both use the same kernel. I'll read up on that matter. Thanks
 

livix07

Well-Known Member
...so I'll probably try Debian or some other Debian-based distro (Mint perhaps) before I finally choose.
As a Debian Linux user, I can only encourage you to use it.
What attracted me to it is it's performance and stability, which are results of how serious they are in dealing with the packages.
 
Top