Looking for memory upgrade

Discussion in 'Windows 7 Hardware' started by reghakr, Feb 17, 2010.

  1. reghakr

    reghakr Excellent Member

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  2. cybercore

    cybercore New Member

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    Your memory real frequency is 400 Mhz, the effective is 800 Mhz NO MATTER how many modules you have.

    Effective = 2 signals per 1 tact = 400 x 2 = 800 Mhz.

    (That's how you calculate the effective frequency of DDR > 1600)

    :)
     
  3. reghakr

    reghakr Excellent Member

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    Thanks for the technical aspects, but will it work?
     
  4. ickymay

    ickymay New Member

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    you need to exactly match to the make and model of your existing ram if your going to try combine them, try using CPUZ for a more accurate description and hopefully make identifier :)
     
  5. reghakr

    reghakr Excellent Member

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    cpu..


    I guess the easiest way is to pull a chip and use that info.
    Do these screenshots help?


    siv..

    Thanks guys
     
  6. ickymay

    ickymay New Member

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    does the SPD tab on CPUZ show the make ?
     
  7. Digerati

    Digerati Fantastic Member
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    DDR = Double-duty rate which means it can transfer data on both the rise and fall of each cycle (hertz).

    You could do that but you really should go by what the moterboard supports, not what you already have. Unfortunately, you told us nothing of your hardware. Your board may support faster RAM. You should look at your motherboard or PC maker's website. You should also check the changelog for any BIOS updates available for your board to see if any updates support faster RAM.

    Many RAM makers have "wizards" that will probe your motherboard and determine compatible RAM. Here's my canned text on that:

    These popular RAM makers have auto-scanning and/or manual entry RAM wizards to help you determine which RAM is compatible with your motherboard. For manual entry, enter/select the PC or motherboard make and model number and the wizard will list compatible RAM.
    Crucial - Memory Advisor
    Corsair - Memory Configurator (manual data entry only)
    GeIL - Memory Configurator (manual data entry only)
    Kingston - Memory Search (manual data entry only)
    Mushkin - Advisor
    OCZ - Memory Configurator (manual data entry only)
    Patriot - Memory Search (manual data entry only)
    PNY - Memory Configurator (manual data entry only)
    SuperTalent - Memory Finder (manual data entry only)​
    The following retailers have auto-scanners and manual wizards. They sell brand name and/or "house" brand (re-branded) RAM.
    Newegg - Memory Configurator System Tool
    MemoryStock - Upgrade Configurator
    18004Memory – Configurator
    4AllMemory - Memory advisor (automatic and manual)
    TigerDirect - Memory Configurator (manual data entry only)​
     
  8. reghakr

    reghakr Excellent Member

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    ickymay, here's the SPD tab information:

    spd..

    Digiteri,

    Thanks for the links, much appreciated.
     
    #8 reghakr, Feb 18, 2010
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2010
  9. ickymay

    ickymay New Member

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    Most manufacturers of branded ram will make sure it identifies itself so the fact theres no manufacturers name on the SPD tab suggests to me you currently have ValueRam ...........

    If your looking to upgrade it's going to be nearly impossible to match anything to mix with it :frown:

    Sorry if I've missed the info somewhere but can you tell us what's your motherboard manufacturer and model ?
     
  10. reghakr

    reghakr Excellent Member

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    Manufacturer eMachines
    Model MCP61PM-GM

    I have two empty slots, wouldn't the links provided bu Digiteri work?

    No wonder it was only $399.00
     
  11. ickymay

    ickymay New Member

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    maybe :frown:

    It's important to know quite what Value Ram is so heres an explanation I have written in my own Ram guide notes ..................

    Value RAM is often used by large manufacturers in order to keep their build costs down and will normally be very difficult if not impossible to match to in the future of the systems life. If it gives no problems then Value RAM performs just as well as Branded RAM.

    As an end user I would recommend it is always better to buy Branded RAM whenever possible, especially if your experiencing issues with Value RAM on your motherboard. The reason I say this becomes more obvious when you understand what Value RAM means.

    Value RAM is either Branded RAM that has failed the tolerance tests or it has been specifically built to order using the cheapest components available at the time, this creates two problems in it's use. The first is that it's very unlikely it will respond well under extreme stress such as high temperature conditions and overclocking. The second problem is that Value RAM is very inconsistent in build quality where components are varying dependent on the cost of metals at the time it was manufactured. This means same spec Value RAM bought 6 months apart will most likely vary in component quality and therefore produce different results performing differently and causing errors.

    If I ever build a system using Value RAM I will buy ALL of the RAM I intend to have working on that system at the same time from the same supplier, and on purchase I am prepared for it to not work at all or to possibly produce errors when the Operating system is installed.

    I think you need to make a manual inspection of your Ram before you decide if it's Value or branded ;)
     
    #11 ickymay, Feb 19, 2010
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2010
  12. Digerati

    Digerati Fantastic Member
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    Just to make sure there is no misunderstanding, ickymay is (I hope!) talking about "value RAM" which is NOT to be confused with "ValueRAM", from Kingston - generally considered very reliable.

    I don't think that part of your statement is fair. "Branded" does not imply inferior so I don't think "Branded" should be included in this. Branded simply means the retail outlet (BestBuy, Dell, etc.) put their sticker on the product. "RAM that has failed tolerance tests" is a bit misleading too. Almost, if not all RAM is guaranteed for life. Therefore, it is not worth it to sell faulty RAM.

    Value RAM - or perhaps "generic" RAM may better describe what we are talking about - though again, "failed tolerance testing" may be a bit harsh. Tolerance for what? Heat? Speed? In those cases, I would suspect the tested speeds would be lowered and lowered until the heat stays within tolerances, and then the modules packaged and labeled for that speed. Those devices that fail tolerance testing are destroyed. Remember, the chips may be made at one factory and shipped to another for assembly on to the RAM circuit boards to become sticks or RAM modules.

    Generic RAM is perhaps, more accurately labeled than the high-end stuff. This is because the big makers know folks buying their high end RAM may dabble in overclocking too, and so the packaging may indicate one speed, but the RAM capable of more. Generic is not likely to have much headroom for any overclocking.

    I think that is very wise advice - and I do that regardless the quality level or brand of the RAM used because it is not likely I would be able to find an exact match 1 or 2 years from now, regardless the brand used. Unfortunately, the budget does not always allow for what we want during the initial purchase. So at least buy in pairs for dual channel, or trips for triple, as supported by your motherboard.

    @reghakr - thanks for the name edit - though I wonder who Digiteri is? ;)
     
  13. ickymay

    ickymay New Member

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    yes Kingston ValueRAM is it seems an exception to this "rule of thumb"
    so you need to be sure you've matched it up to your system ;)

    Nowhere did I say "branded implies inferior" But I did state that Branded Ram that fails tolerance test's are not always binned and manufacturers do ship modules which where built as branded then failed to meet the spec demanded by that brand but will still perform well enough to be sold as generic and value. Branded RAM is tested to beyond 100% tolerance and should perform above rated voltages , timings and temperatures !

    thanks for your clarification though Digiteri ....... oops Digerati and I will add that to my RAM guide :cool:
     
  14. Digerati

    Digerati Fantastic Member
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    No you didn't but you did say,
    That "implied" to me that you were saying failed RAM is being sold (unloaded on unsuspecting buyers?) under "branded" labels. Sorry if I misunderstood but I was afraid others reading might too. I think between me talking about lowering and lowering the test speeds to meet specs, and your explanation of relabeling with more realistic specs, covers the bases.

    Exactly. That is why I said when I joined this thread,
    That is what using those wizards help determine too. They all should say the same thing for what the board supports, then offer options. You should be able use the specs from the Crucial wizard, for example, and buy the equivalent by Corsair from Newegg and expect it to work.
     
  15. kemical

    kemical Windows Forum Admin
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    As ickymay pointed out mixing different manufacturers of RAM even if it's the same speed rating can lead to problems.. You might get away with it if you use the corsair RAM as that is pretty forgiving (I should know as I have some running alongside some OCZ stuff and never a hint of a problem). Mind you Jim you already have 4gig why do you want anymore?
     
  16. reghakr

    reghakr Excellent Member

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    Thanks for all the information, I do have it sorted out know regarding the "Value RAM".

    Sorry about the name screwup [​IMG] Digerati, I'll use the copy and paste method from know on.

    OK, I pulled a chip.
    There are two stickers on the chip.

    One states:
    Line 1. GDDR2-8002GB 128MX8 1.8V EP
    Line 2. Looks like a part number........GU342G0ALEPR692C6F1
    Line 3. barcode
    Line 4. UNIFOBA made in Taiwan

    The second sticker is the sertiak number and it begins with KN2GB*********************

    The chips on the RAM itself are ELPIDATWN

    Kemical, The reason for the upgrade is that most postings I've been reading regarding the 64-bit OS have well over 4 Gigs of RAM.

    I plan on putting a mid to high-end graphics card with HDMI out and a 7.1 channel sound card and using it as my Home Theater PC. I realize I'll need to upgrade the power supply also.

    If these specs don't help out, then I guess the solution would be yo contact Gateway ( E-Machine) technical support and tell them I need two more sticks of RAM fir this PC I just bought.

    Either buy directly from them or point me to the correct RAM.

    Thank you all of you for getting involved and educating me at the same time..........always learning.
     
  17. kemical

    kemical Windows Forum Admin
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  18. ickymay

    ickymay New Member

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    I wouldn't be in a hurry to throw more ram at your system as 4 gig should be plenty and unless your running something that specifically locks up ram like a virtual box then I can't see why you need more ?
     
  19. reghakr

    reghakr Excellent Member

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    OK guys,

    You are the experts here and Ill go along with your advice.

    Since I do a lot of video and audio conversions, these are the programs that suck up most of the memory and trying to do something in the background is when the system slows down.

    I'll concentrate what video and audio cards I intend on purchasing.

    Thank you all for your kelp.
     
  20. Digerati

    Digerati Fantastic Member
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    If you are running a 64-Bit OS, then you can certainly take advantage of more than 4Gb of RAM. And A/V converting is one area you might see a significant improvement. That said, unless that is your job, A/V conversions are usually a one-time event - once it's done, then you just listen and watch and it takes little RAM, CPU, or even graphics horsepower to watch videos or listen to tunes.

    Since you have 4Gb now, I think the best way to spend your money is for a good graphics card. The more capable the card, the more the CPU can hand off to the card. And it takes little to nothing for a CPU to hand off tasks.

    That said, eMachines are the budget line of Gateway/Acer computers. They are not really designed to accommodate upgrading - in fact, they are almost considered disposable computers (except for the impact on the environment). If me, I would save my pennies and instead, start looking at a good case to assemble a new computer in. You are already talking about buying more RAM, a graphics card, a sound card, and a new PSU. And I should point out - ohh... wait a minute...

    According to the specs page for your motherboard, it only supports 4Gb!

    I was going to say, if you bought more RAM for this machine you would be spending money on obsolete technology as DDR3 is here to stay while DDR2 is on the way out. One nice thing about building your own is you don't have to buy all the components at once. You can split it up over a few paydays. I do recommend buying the motherboard, RAM, and CPU together, so that typically is the biggest expense, then the graphics card. Unless of course if you are serious about graphics conversions, then the card (or cards) would consume the budget - $3000 PNY.

    And for the record, many newer high-end motherboards are designed to be integrated into home theater systems and therefore support very high quality on-board digital audio. You probably would not need to buy a separate sound card - and I say that as someone who's first love, before computers (and that started in 1975) was audio reproduction and audiophile electronics. The speakers are the limiting factor, not the electronics.
     

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