More Questions On Dual Boot Vista & W7.

BobHelms

Extraordinary Member
#1
Hello,
I've have a new laptop with Vista 32 installed. I'm going to put W7 32 on it as soon as I can get the "free after all the red tape" DVD from my vendor. Are there any (known) disadvantages to having both OS's installed with dual boot capability? Is there a "preferred" way of installing W7 in a dual boot configuration with Vista? Does Vista (Ultimate) contain the proper tools to shrink the (320GB) HDD properly to add a partition for W7 or do I need to get a another HD manager? Are there any threads any where that list apps that will not work in W7 but do work in Vista? TIA for any info provided.
Bob Helms
 


#2
You have a lot of questions. I think you can Google the simpler ones... Or read my blogs:

Windows 7 Forums - tblount

..but I can tell you that windows 7 has a feature under "properties" when you click on a program that will allow you to run the program (you clicked on) in Compatibality modes all the way back to Windows 95.

I don't think there are partition tools available from the Install menu. You just have format and a couple other utilities.

I would just get another hard drive and install Win 7 .. then use a USB to SATA adapter cable (about $5) to access the old vista drive from a usb port. There is a BIG disadvantage when fiddling around with partitions.. you can EASILY lose all your data. If we don't see you around in a few weeks we'll have a good idea what happened.
 


BobHelms

Extraordinary Member
#3
You have a lot of questions. I think you can Google the simpler ones... Or read my blogs:

Windows 7 Forums - tblount

..but I can tell you that windows 7 has a feature under \"properties\" when you click on a program that will allow you to run the program (you clicked on) in Compatibality modes all the way back to Windows 95.

I don't think there are partition tools available from the Install menu. You just have format and a couple other utilities.

I would just get another hard drive and install Win 7 .. then use a USB to SATA adapter cable (about $5) to access the old vista drive from a usb port. There is a BIG disadvantage when fiddling around with partitions.. you can EASILY lose all your data. If we don't see you around in a few weeks we'll have a good idea what happened.
Hi tblount,
First of all I will definitely read all your Blogs. My question on Vista disk mgmt was aimed at creating another partition for W7 from a up and running Vista. I do not have this (Vista) system yet so I'm asking all these beginner questions so I'll know enough to be dangerous when it does arrive. I've used 3rd party tools to do the resize and partition thing before and would be real careful not to lose anything I can't recreate. I just figured it would be easier to have dual boot configuration over a dual drive configuration. When I do get W7 I will probably need to post more novice questions. Thanks for your help.
 


BobHelms

Extraordinary Member
#4
Ok, Bob, let's start w/ the easiest question 1st...

"Are there any (known) disadvantages to having both OS's installed with dual boot capability?" NO

Now, basically it's no big deal, just need an existing OS on a drive (partition) & another drive (partition) available for the 2nd OS. Some laptops have 2 by default, a System Drive & a Data Drive. I know Acer & LG do this.

At any rate, assuming the 2 drive scenario...

Simpley put the Win7 media in, tell it on what drive to install & once finished you will, upon boot-up, have a screen listing the 2 OSs for you to select which you want to boot.

Drew

"A scan a day keeps the nasties away"
Hi Drew,
Thanks for the reply. Once my (Lenovo) Laptop is delivered I'll see how many partitions there are. I think they load a service partition in addition to the OS partition. I'm hoping to make two OS partions on the 320GB drive and do the dual boot thing with W7 being the default choice. Might have more beginner questions once my system arrives and after obtaining the W7 upgrade. Thanks again for your help.
 


#5
Bob,

Before trying to dual boot, and mess with your drive partitions, I highly recommend creating recovery disks, unless you are fortunate enough to have them shipped with the new computer. If you mess something up in the process of install, simply pop the recovery disks in and start over!

Once you have made your recovery disks, I recommend using disk management to delete the recovery partition and extend the current hard drive to fill the open space. If you have the disks in hand, and put them in a safe place, you have no need for the recovery partition and can use the space it occupies.


Disk management in Vista is a simple way to manage your drive partitions. No more need for 3rd party software.

To delete a partition, select the partition and delete. It's that simple. An empty space will appear where the former drive used to be. Select the other partition and extend it into the empty space.
To create a new partition, shrink the existing drive and create a new partition in the empty space you created.

You will need to format the empty space that you created, assign it a drive letter (like D: if you have deleted the recovery drive), and then you're done.

Then when installing Windows 7, according to what I have read, you can choose a custom install and select the exact partition you wish to use. It sounds like there is actually a partition manager within the install, but I haven't used it yet, so I make no guarantees.



My only experience with running W7 was when I put the beta on a virtual machine, but I have dual booted Vista with a couple different versions of linux. And I messed around with tri-booting linux distros, as well as installing one distro (successfully) on a USB flash drive.

It's fairly simple to do these processes, though it can prove daunting at first. Since it is a new machine, you likely won't have lots of precious files on the drive that you could lose if you mess it up, so it should be a fairly stress free situation.
 


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