my computer automatically turn on when i connect it to the power source

Discussion in 'Windows 7 Hardware' started by tomazi, Dec 3, 2011.

  1. tomazi

    tomazi New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2011
    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    0
    my computer automatically turn on when i connect it to the power source....And after few seconds it restarts its self...this cycle repeats its self over and over again until i dont disconnect the power source.

    I tried removing the mother board out of the PC case and test it, but i get the same result.....

    I think got something to do with the BIOS....?

    HELP PLZ :(
     
  2. Saltgrass

    Saltgrass Excellent Member
    Microsoft Community Contributor

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2009
    Messages:
    15,157
    Likes Received:
    393
    Are you seeing anything on the monitor? Any beeps during a boot? Does it sound like a normal boot.

    I had a motherboard once that would power up anytime I plugged in power, but then shut back down until I actually started it. If you don't think it is a short on the motherboard, possibly a new power supply would help..

    There are situations where Windows will reboot if it is getting a BSOD. But you can turn that off and check for a dump file. But if you aren't getting any video, possibly the video card is acting up.
     
  3. Trouble

    Trouble Noob Whisperer

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2009
    Messages:
    13,845
    Likes Received:
    833
    You may try looking around in your BIOS Setup Utility for the "Condition" or "State" or words to that effect "After power" resumes.
    Every BIOS is a bit different, but generally you'll see something like "Remain Off" or "On"
     
  4. Digerati

    Digerati Fantastic Member
    Microsoft MVP

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2009
    Messages:
    2,069
    Likes Received:
    159
    I agree with your initial assessment and Trouble's recommendation. Most BIOS Setup Menu's have to option to boot the computer when power resumes. This is typically used for unattended (or remote) systems/servers so they can automatically boot up after a power outage. The default, however, is typically to not boot so I would wonder how that got changed, if that is the issue. You might consider a resetting the BIOS.

    Also, a faulty PSU could cause this too so swapping in a spare for testing is another option.
     
    1 person likes this.
  5. OldTimer

    OldTimer Banned

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2010
    Messages:
    806
    Likes Received:
    29
    I purposely set my own BIOS to boot up the PC whenever power is applied to it.
    I have my PC, monitor, speakers, etc., all plugged into a Multi Outlet power strip and flipping that one switch powers up my entire system. The little power switches on most computers and monitors are very cheap and delicate and I don't like to use them any more than necessary.

    Most BIOS's do have someplace to set how the power is handled by the motherboard.
    Default is Remain OFF. So setting the BIOS to default, would solve that problem at least.

    Good Luck,
    :cool:
     
  6. Digerati

    Digerati Fantastic Member
    Microsoft MVP

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2009
    Messages:
    2,069
    Likes Received:
    159
    And those are convenient as long as you remember to always shutdown Windows gracefully first. The problem is, some folks forget or get impatient and kill power to the computer while Windows is still up, and that can cause data corruption and failure to boot. They don't work well with an UPS either and I personally think all computers should be on a good UPS with AVR (automatic voltage regulation).
     
  7. OldTimer

    OldTimer Banned

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2010
    Messages:
    806
    Likes Received:
    29
    When a computer does its own shutdown, it's not really OFF, contrary to popular belief.
    The 5v output of the power supply is still ON and supplying power to the Power On switch,
    which is a momentary contact switch, like a door bell button.

    For safety, a desktop PC should be plugged into a power strip. So the power flow should be like this:

    Wall power >>>>>UPS>>>>>Power Strip with ON/OFF switch>>>>>Desktop PC.

    A desktop PC is only really OFF when the input power has been shut off.
    Then, there's NO way a computer can come on by itself.

    Many other household appliances are similar to PC's, in that they still draw power even when you're not using them.
    Television sets and microwave ovens are two very good examples.

    Cheers Mates!
    :cool:
     
  8. Digerati

    Digerati Fantastic Member
    Microsoft MVP

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2009
    Messages:
    2,069
    Likes Received:
    159
    To be sure, I was not implying otherwise. No doubt, a computer (and monitor and speakers too) all draw power when Windows is shutdown and the PC is simply turned off. And that ATX required +5Vsb standby voltage is present at several points across the motherboard besides the front panel "soft power" switch. It powers several "Wake on..." systems too, like Wake on Keyboard, Wake on Mouse and Wake on LAN as well.

    So no doubt killing total power can save a nice chunk of change over the course of a year - especially if you do the same throughout the house - if you can stand the flashing clocks every time you power up again.

    I think your "Wall power >>>>>UPS>>>>>Power Strip with ON/OFF switch>>>>>Desktop PC" configuration is a great solution - as long as the Power Strip is not a surge and spike protector too. Many UPS don't like that and most UPS makers advise against it in their manuals.
     

Share This Page

Loading...