need to enter hex WEP key that has no viewable ASCII equivalent

Discussion in 'Windows 7 Networking' started by Scooby Rex, Apr 13, 2010.

  1. Scooby Rex

    Scooby Rex New Member

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    I am trying to connect to a wireless router in the house I share with roommates. It is not my router, just what they give me access to with my rent. They are using a WEP key with this router. Just for clarity I will even post the WEP key (since no one on here will know what router this is for). The 5 byte WEP key in hexadecimal is 18 01 44 62 AE. As you can probably see... the first 2 characters have no viewable ASCII character equivalent and Windows 7 doesn't appear to allow me to enter in the Hex values when entering a WEP key. So, can Windows 7 not handle this or can the WEP key for a network be entered in Hex format somewhere and I just don't know where yet?

    I have Googled everything and searched on this forum and don't find an answer anywhere. Please help with a solution!
     
  2. cybercore

    cybercore New Member

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    What are those 2 problem characters exactly ? Do you not have those ascii characters on your keyboard ? You can save that key in a text file, then open the file on your 7 machine and paste it.

    In worst case, can't you change the WEP key to a simpler characters combination ?
     
  3. Scooby Rex

    Scooby Rex New Member

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    Those characters end up being something like <backspace> and something else. Both unviewable. It's not my router or network so no I can't go change them. My roommates have a PS3, a Mac, a Linux box and an older Windows system on the net. So far it just looks like Microsoft can't handle something like this in Windows 7. That's pitiful because previous versions of Windows allowed me to enter in a hex number for the security hey. They actually took out needed functionality with my "upgrade" to Windows 7?
     
  4. cybercore

    cybercore New Member

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    1. No, upgrading Vista to 7 isn't supposed to take away functionality, although clean install is often recommended.

    2. Can you ask them to copy the key for you in a text file:

     
  5. Scooby Rex

    Scooby Rex New Member

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    You can't cut and paste a <Backspace> or any unviewable characters from a text file. That is the problem.
     
  6. cybercore

    cybercore New Member

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    If you can copy the key (try to highlight it and press Ctr-C), then you can paste it. May not work with all characters like hieroglyphs etc.

    Or ask your mates to change the key.

    Windows 7 should support all characters present in XP and Vista.
     
  7. Scooby Rex

    Scooby Rex New Member

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    OK. I just looked up exactly what those two characters are. 01 is a "start of heading" character (not viewable) and 18 is a "cancel" character (not viewable). These are valid WEP hex characters and apparently every operating system out there except Windows 7 allows them to be entered. Again, if a file has these two characters in it they will either not be displayed (one posibility), or a viewable character substituted for them like a "?" or something. The substituted character of course would not be the character that I need (because what I need is not viewable). So there is no way I can cut/copy a viewable string of characters using CNTRL-C or any other cut/copy function and paste it correctly into the WEP key box that windows 7 provides and it be correct. This is basic computing. Not all characters are visable. ASCII 32 is the first viewable character which is <space>. To enter unviewable characters it must be intered in by it's ASCII equivalent number using either hex or decimal. Apparently Windows 7 took this required functionality out.

    No, I will not ask my mates to change the WEP key since all of their real and functional operating systems can handle it and they are all already configured and functioning correctly with the current key. I would rather switch my operating system to any of the other operating systems out there that were actually designed intelligently. I hope and pray that I am jumping the gun here and that Windows 7 can actually handle this someway and that they just made it VERY difficult. But right now it looks like they intentionally broke the WEP functionality according to the WEP standard. Without being able to connect to my local provided network, Windows 7 is completely useless to me and is just more money that Microsoft siphoned from me for a very inferior product!

    -Sorry for my rant but I am very upset right now that I just blew a ton of money for a broken operating system! LINUX is free and my roommate said that his complete install of Mac Snow Leopard only cost him like $25. And it works awesome! I feel like a total sucker right now!
     
  8. michaelmotes

    michaelmotes New Member

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    Man, All I do is enter the Hex. In windows 7, click on network system tray icon, a list of wireless networks appears, click one and it expands, deselect the connect automatically box, click connect, a input box opens asking for secret key, enter hex key, connection suceeds. Works for me. Enter key without colons, like AA:BB:CC:DD:EE would be AABBCCDDEE.

    gl hf
     

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