permissions Hell.........

paradive

Senior Member
#1
i'm the only user with an account on my machine.
hence, the administrator.

still, i've been being bombarded with permission errors of every kind lately (most recently, while trying to install Python).

in researching, i've found i have no control of the Windows folder (when i should have full control).
and i can't seem to edit the permissions.

i double-checked, and yes, i'm the administrator.

any ideas?
what now?
 


ussnorway

Windows Forum Team
Staff member
Premium Supporter
#2
Are you using Windows 8 or 8.1.1?
Is you account local or microsft id... does your username = an email address?
In any event you are prob not in fact the administrator because both systems tern that account off and having it on would most likly mean you have malware on the system.


How can I recover forgotten Windows 8.1 password
 


paradive

Senior Member
#3
Are you using Windows 8 or 8.1.1?
Is you account local or microsft id... does your username = an email address?
In any event you are prob not in fact the administrator because both systems tern that account off and having it on would most likly mean you have malware on the system.


How can I recover forgotten Windows 8.1 password
8.1
signing in with my MS ID.
 


ussnorway

Windows Forum Team
Staff member
Premium Supporter
#4
Ok a Microsoft account it is;
You can run as admin once by right click an icon and selecting "run as admin"… all permanent software should be installed as admin for best practice.

Any action will be filtered by the action centre by asking "are you sure you want to do that" [insert thing you just told the computer to do] you can turn this American nag ware off by moving the slider down to the bottom rung and yes it will indeed ask if you are sure you want to do that as well.
sure.png


If you use a program a lot and don't wont to select "run as admin" every time you blow your nose then right click the icon, select "properties", then "short cut" and "advanced" then tick the "always run as admin" box
Screenshot (458).png
 


Neemobeer

Windows Forum Team
Staff member
#5
Since Windows Vista they have had UAC and what is called mandatory integrity check. Which only allows you to write to folders/files that have the same or lower mandatory integrity check. When you log in even as an administrator your user account runs at a medium mandatory integrity check. Folders such as C:\Windows have a high mandatory integrity check. When you select the option "Run As Administrator" Windows switches you to a new logon session, same user account but this special logon session has your users admin token which provides you with the required high mandatory integrity check level required to modify folders such as C:\Windows. You can see this using accesschk from sysinternals.
 


paradive

Senior Member
#6
Since Windows Vista they have had UAC and what is called mandatory integrity check. Which only allows you to write to folders/files that have the same or lower mandatory integrity check. When you log in even as an administrator your user account runs at a medium mandatory integrity check. Folders such as C:\Windows have a high mandatory integrity check. When you select the option "Run As Administrator" Windows switches you to a new logon session, same user account but this special logon session has your users admin token which provides you with the required high mandatory integrity check level required to modify folders such as C:\Windows. You can see this using accesschk from sysinternals.
well, my question lies in.......

since i'm the administrator that's always logging in, how do i "remind it" that i'm the administrator so i don't have to remember to do "run as..." all the time?
 


Neemobeer

Windows Forum Team
Staff member
#7
You would have to turn of UAC which @ussnorway has a screen shot of turning it off. It's not advisable though since you would basically be turning off a major security feature.
 


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