PSU Smoking and Graphics card not working now

Discussion in 'Windows 7 Hardware' started by ivtecm, Nov 22, 2012.

  1. ivtecm

    ivtecm New Member

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    Yesterday my 500w powersupply started smoking up so I went out and bought a Thermaltake Lightpower 700w powersupply. After I finished rewiring my computer I noticed my graphics card wasn't working on my computer so I changed my input from HDMI to VGA to use the integrated graphics card.


    I'm not sure what caused the original 500w powersupply to smoke up and why my graphics card doesn't work anymore. I'm unsure whether the graphics card isn't working because i've made a mistake in wiring the connection from my PSU to motherboard or if the PSU killed it.


    Yesterday I also received a USB Wireless Receiver for Xbox which I plugged in the top USB slots I never use, could this be a reason for the PSU faulting? Sometimes when I plug in a USB device the metal surrounding the slots spark up a little which is why I mentioned the USB wireless receiver.


    Below are the specifications of my system:


    AMD Phenom X4 955 Black Edition 3.2ghz
    Gigabyte GA-880GM-UD2H
    Kingston 2x4GB Ram 1333mhz
    (New PSU) Thermaltake Lightpower 700w - (Old PSU) 500w
    Sapphire Radeon HD6850 1GB GDDR5 Firmware flashed to HD6870


    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


    Thanks for your help in advance.
     
  2. Digerati

    Digerati Fantastic Member
    Microsoft MVP

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    Unfortunately, when your old PSU fried, it could have failed catastrophically and sent destructive voltages to the connected devices - including the graphics card, the motherboard, and anything plugged into the motherboard. :(

    Why do you suspect you might have made a mistake in wiring? Did you go back in and verify all is correct?

    You should not see sparks when inserting a USB device to a USB port. Do devices work in those ports? Sparks like that suggest an improper connection, or even a bad ground connection to Earth. You might want to check your outlets with a AC Outlet Tester. I recommend one with a GFCI (ground fault circuit interrupt) indicator as it can be used to test bathroom and kitchen outlets too. These testers can be found for your type and voltage outlet, foreign or domestic, at most home improvement stores, or even the electrical department at Walmart.
     
  3. ivtecm

    ivtecm New Member

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    Thanks for the reply.
    I was thinking maybe my new power supply may of had a different way of wiring compared to my old one. Yes, I went multiple times to see if anything doesn't look right. Everything works except i'm unable to view 1920x1080 resolution and my Windows rating for graphics is 1, so i'm assuming there is something up with that like not being able to detect it.

    Yes, devices still work in those ports. I didn't realise it was this bad as I've been running my computer like this for a year now.

    I might be looking at replacing my components now, would the case need replacing also?

    Cheers
     
  4. Digerati

    Digerati Fantastic Member
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    The ATX Form Factor standard dictates that all ATX power supplies will support all ATX motherboards and fit inside all ATX cases. Newer PSUs will have additional connectors for newer, more power hungry devices (like newer graphics cards), but all the "standard" voltages (+12VDC, +5VDC and +3.3VDC) and connectors will be compatible.

    The exception would be for older Dell and some Compaq/HP systems. Those companies modified the motherboard connection, forcing the use of a proprietary PSU. This "scam" was to force users to buy replacement parts from Dell and Compaq - at higher prices, of course. But newer systems are standard.

    You did not tell us what case you have so don't know if you need to replace it. Again, if ATX (and likely is) compatibility should not be an issue - unless that is a slim or low-profile case - then you may have problems with add-on cards.

    Note it is the case's responsibility to house the components AND provide an adequate "flow" of cool air moving front-to-back through the case. That means your case MUST provide good fan support. I generally recommend and prefer at least one large (120mm or larger) fan in front pulling cool air in, and at least one large fan (not counting any in the PSU) exhausting heated air out.
     

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