Saving and moving files and folders - problems

Discussion in 'Windows 7 Help and Support' started by richard10, May 16, 2010.

  1. richard10

    richard10 New Member

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    I am using Windows 7 Home Premium in a Toshiba NB305-N410BL Netbook. Sometimes when I try to save a file in certain program subfolders, I cannot do it. Instead I get a message box, "You don't have permission to save in this location. Contact the administrator to obtain permission. Save in My Documents instead."
    When I go to Control Panel>User Accounts, it shows only account - mine, and I am the Administrator.

    1) What could be causing this problem - the inability to save files in certain folders?

    2) How do I solve this problem - the ability to save files in whatever folder I want?

    3) How do I obtain permission from the Administrator? I am confused since I am the Administrator.

    When I try to move a folder, sometimes a message box appears stating that I need to provide administrator permission to move this folder. If I then click on the "Continue" button, I am still able to move the folder in spite of the message box.

    4) Why does this message box appear and how do I prevent it from appearing?

    5) How does one provide "Administrator permission?"

    Thanks.
    Richard
     
  2. RAK

    RAK Extraordinary Member

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    If you open Msconfig and then the "Tools" tab, the second item is the "Change settings for the UAC"
    Launch this and wind the needle down to the bottom. This will mostly eliminate warnings that you require Admin permission.
    But I do not think this is your problem. From where and to where are you trying to copy/move.? The old Documents and Settings folder is no longer for user use and, as the message said, you should now save the intended files in My Documents. (Unless it is Music..etc, then you sabe to another appropriate folder under your username.
     
  3. patcooke

    patcooke Microsoft MVP
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    Not a good habit

    Saving data anywhere on the system drive is not a good idea and saving files to program subfiles especially so. Best practice is to keep all user data files on a totally separate drive/partition from the system drive. The system drive should be reserved for the system and applications programs and the associated files only. I would even discourage use of the various "My Documents", "My Music" folders etc. If you have only one physical drive I would partition it and keep software and data separate. There are all sorts of good reasons for this - the main one being that if/when you need to recover your system to solve a problem you will lose all your data in the process. It also keeps your system drive down to a minimum size which makes it better for backup images. It also avoids alll the problem s of "ownership".
     
  4. cybercore

    cybercore New Member

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    Absolutely agree with all pointed out above, indeed this is not a very good habit to save files anywhere on the system drive. I would not recommend to move system/program files/folders.



    It is possible to deny permission for everyone including administrators, system, and trusted installers. Permissions can be set manually or programmability by software.




    If you cannot do without accessing those folders, you can change their permissions by right-clicking on those folders -> properties -> security

    (alternatively, you can Add "Take Ownership" to Explorer Right-Click Menu in Win 7 or Vista)


    See 2.

    See 1.

    See 2.
     
  5. RAK

    RAK Extraordinary Member

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    I have always, since as far back as I can remember, always saved to the default, which is, in the case of Microsoft OS's, is usually a user folder in the the "System" Drive. Windows 7 folder system has been designed exactly for that. The only precaution is, sensibly, to make sure you use regular images/backups for valuable data. Even a second drive, as suggested, can go sick!
    To try to take ownership, using my hack, or through the security options, is a bad idea. They are secured for a purpose.
    Not quite sure if I understand Pat's reference to saving files to program subfiles. Perhaps ypu mean folders?
    How would saving the files to a separate partition/hard disk, solve the problem of ownership? Not clear on that one either. Or do you mean he would not then need permission to save to his created folders?
    Perhaps the OP is aware of the suggested options, but maybe, as I suggested, his problem is not understand the new junction folder system in Windows 7
     
  6. patcooke

    patcooke Microsoft MVP
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    Yes - I meant "folders"

    But beyond that - I would stick very firmly to all of my other recommendations which have been industry standards for a long time. The integration of software and data is contrary to all established industry standards and practice. It has no benefits whatever and serves only to create difficulties in securing, accessing and recovering user data. The practice has been enouraged and has become established through use of the various default storage folders embedded amongst the Microsoft system folders and also by default download areas of many software packages but for the reasons I have stated earlier (and others) I consider it to be 100% bad practice.
     
  7. RAK

    RAK Extraordinary Member

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    It could lead into an interesting discussion. Industry standards? Are not the software manufacturers part of that group?
    We are talking about the average, and worldwide, user. The paths are called "defaults" for that reason. It almost every case theose paths can be customised ( As you have said yourself!)
    After 30 years of experimentation on their part, I would go along with what the big software people have decided is the best solution. I am not referring to badly written third party software.
    Anyway, We are digressing from the OP.
     
  8. cybercore

    cybercore New Member

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    There should be no problem saving files to and moving folders within user folder. However, the system and certain software restrict access to certain files for a reason. So, I wouldn't recommend (imho) touching those files and folders.

    As for saving to My Documents and the like, there is nothing wrong nor dangerous with that. I prefer not to accumulate much in my user folders though and always take time to sort it to other places. For example, I do not keep 5 of my favorite DVDs in My Video, nor do I store 12 Gbs of mp3's in My Music, nor do I capture with FRAPS to My Documents or to Program Files/Fraps/Movies; instead, I use separate partitions for large files. Just my experience. : )
     
  9. RAK

    RAK Extraordinary Member

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    Way to go, Cyber!
     

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