Solved: Stop Error 0x1E caused by nvlddmkm.sys during Windows 7 RC setup

earcmba

Senior Member
#1
Workaround for nVidia display driver issue
Motherboard: ASUS M2NPV-VM
BIOS Version: 0504
GPU: nVidia GeForce 6150
in Windows 7 RC

Symptoms: Stop Error 0x0000001E caused by nvlddmkm.sys during Windows 7 RC setup

Solution: Replace the nvlddmkm.sys file with a newer version
Update: Easier solution found, see later post.

Details:

Perform these steps on another computer:
1) Download a current driver from nvidia.
2) Extract nvlddmkm.sy_ using WinRAR.
3) Expand nvlddmkm.sy_ from windows command prompt
cd [path_to_nvlddmkm.sy_]
expand -r nvlddmkm.sy_ nvlddmkm.sys
4) Put a copy of the new nvlddmkm.sys file on a flash drive

Restart Windows 7 Setup and perform these steps:
1) During the "Expanding files" step, press Shift-F10 to open a command prompt
2) Replace the nvlddmkm.sys file located at
C:\Windows\System32\DriverStore\FileRepository\nv_lh.inf_amd64_neutral_4f38d443efdd0a70
with the new one from the flash drive.
Wait for setup to create the file before you replace it -- seems to occur when
the progress meter reaches about 70%.
3) Let the install process finish, hopefully without any blue screens.

You will probably want to install the complete nvidia driver using the usual method once
Windows setup is complete.

Reference:
nvlddmkm.sys problems ... - Vista Forums
 


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#2
Awesome!! That did the trick!

Thank you very much. That allowed me to complete the installation and boot-up into Win7. :D

kn1gh7h4wk

OS: Windows 7 x64 RC 1
Motherboard: Foxconn 6150bk8mc
Chipset/GPU: nForce 430/GeForce 6150B
 


#3
wish i would have known about this when I installed. I just went and got a $20 graphics card. which helps big time anyway.
 


#4
This procedure worked for me. Thanks :)

During the installation of Windows 7 RTM, I had at some point the BSOD caused by nvlddmkm.sys. I replaced that file at 65% of the extraction of files by the driver 190.62 from NVidia and could at least complete the installation of Windows.

Once Windows had started, I performed the installation of the complete driver successfully.

My configuration:
- Motherboard Asus P5B-Plus
- Quad Core 8200
- 4 Gb RAM
- Graphic card Sparkle Geforce 8600 GT
- 4 HDD: 1 x System, 1 x Video files, and 2 x 200GB in Raid 0 for the data
- Windows 7 - fr_windows_7_ultimate_x64_dvd_x15-65928.iso
 


#5
Hello... New here. I'm at the point where I have the replacement nvlddmkm.sys on a flash drive ready to go, but I'm sorry to ask cause I'm new to this, how do I replace the loaded file (at 60-70%) with the one on my flash drive using the command prompt? Appreciate your patience...
 


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#6
Can someone please post detailed instructions on how to do this. I don't know how to use command promt to expand and copy the files. This is really pissing me off, I can't even start the pc in safe mode because no operating system is installed yet. Thanks in advance.
 


#7
This solution worked perfect and solved my issue as well. A+
 


earcmba

Senior Member
#8
Update: Easier solution found

Glad to see this worked for some others. A few months later I was going through this process again and found a simpler solution. The original method described replacing a driver file, but since the driver is signed, replacing the file with a newer version invalidates the signing and Windows falls back to a generic driver. In other words, it's not necessary to download, extract, and replace the file - you just delete it.

So, the easier solution is:

  1. Restart Windows 7 Setup
  2. During the "Expanding files" step, press Shift-F10 to open a command prompt
  3. Delete the nvlddmkm.sys file located at C:\Windows\System32\DriverStore\FileRepository\nv_lh.inf_amd64_neutral_4f38d443efdd0a70.
    Wait for setup to create the file before you delete -- seems to occur when the progress meter reaches about 70%.
    Do not simply delete the folder before files are placed in it or the install process will fail.
    The commands you type in the command prompt are
    Code:
    cd C:\Windows\System32\DriverStore\FileRepository\nv_lh.inf_amd64_neutral_4f38d443efdd0a70
    del nvlddmkm.sys
  4. Let the install process finish, hopefully without any blue screens.
  5. Download and install the current driver from nvidia.
 


#9
  1. The commands you type in the command prompt are
    Code:
    cd C:\Windows\System32\DriverStore\FileRepository\nv_lh.inf_amd64_neutral_4f38d443efdd0a70
    del nvlddmkm.sys
Are these 2 (two) individual steps? Meaning...
Step 1 - cd C:\Windows\System32\DriverStore\FileRepository\nv_lh.inf_amd64_neutral_4f38d443efdd0a70
Step 2 - del nvlddmkm.sys

Or is it just 1 (one) command? Meaning...
Step 1 - cd C:\Windows\System32\DriverStore\FileRepository\nv_lh.inf_amd64_neutral_4f38d443efdd0a70
del nvlddmkm.sys

If the latter, is there a "space" between "...4f38d443efdd0a70" and "del"?

Honestly, I've tried every possible combination of this command I could think of, but simply replies with "The system cannot find the path specified"... I'm freakin' out here.

Perhaps you should know this (if it changes things?), I'm using a RAID 0 with a couple of SAS drives, created the array, loaded the driver, found the partition, etc... No other drives plugged in... In the name of everything that's sacred, please help.
 


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#10
@earcmba

nice one, with the shift-f10 to get into the shell, this helped me a lot! thx

@hbag899

once being in shell with shift-f10 you just make sure you are in your system directory (mostly c:\) and enter no more than:

del nvlddmkm.sys /S

the /S searches for the file in subfolders and deletes the nvlddmkm.sys there, which fixes the problem much faster as the large number at the end of the folder mentioned above changes with ever installation i guess

hope this helps anyone, as it helped me
thx again

::rys
 


#11
nvlddmkm-sys

When installing Windows 7 on my Imac (with GeForce 7600) I experienced the same BSOD. At this point the driver was already "installed" and so I just deleted the driver from c:\windows\system32 instead of the DriverStore subdirectory. This "fixed" my problem.

However, after installation I did a further search. It seems there is a firmware update from Apple that addresses this specific issue. This firmware update fixes the installation bug for Mac users that install Windows 7 on a system with a GeForce 7300, GeForce 7600 or Quadro FX 4500 videocard installed.

See this topic: Boot Camp: "0x80070005" appears when upgrading from Vista to Windows 7

There might be firmware updates available for windows users that experience the same problem, but I didn't check this out. Just to let you all know...
 


#12
i have a "big" question , by "restart windows setup" you mean at some simply restart or instal all windows 7 Again ???
 


#13
del nvlddmkm.sys /S - Worked great, this had to be done after the first reboot.
 


#14
I've managed to bring back to life my ASUS A8N-SLI with GeForce6200GT thanks to the ''magic commands'' of Ryan Shalluca and earcmba that I've combined. Now I am able to watch ''Finishing Installation'' in Win7 after 2 days of BSODs and so much frustration.
Thanks again guys !
 


#15
Just wanted to say THANK YOU VERY MUCH to the folks who contributed to this thread AND to the webmaster for leaving it up. It is STILL relevant. I just spent 8 hours backing up data from a Dell T3400 Precision that developed a) the BSOD, b) couldn't be repaired, and c) failed w/this specific error due to nvlddmkm.sys. Spent another 8 hours fighting w/the repair process and install, only to get c) above, repeatedly... very tired of seeing the BSOD. Note that simply deleting nvlddmkm.sys from an install that has blue screened will not necessarily fix the problem. Sure didn't in my case. But shift+F10 and changing the prompt to the drive where Win 7 was being installed, then "del nvlddmkm.sys /S" did the trick (followed by "exit" of course once done). Deleted the two copies of it (one from the driver storage path) and got me out of the shell in time to watch the process finish. I am now (THANKFULLY) staring at the stock DELL background and a new taskbar, etc.

I did perform a full wipe and repartitioning of the HD (see: http://www.sevenforums.com/tutorials/91339-ssd-hdd-optimize-windows-reinstallation.html FYI), and used "clean all" instead of "clean" when running DISKPART. If anyone else does this, do note that "clean all" takes AGES to complete - don't panic. Estimates for 1 TB drives are up to 5 hours for it to complete. So, if "clean all" is your thing and you've got a big HD, find something else to do in the meanwhile.

Thanks again! Very much appreciated.
 


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