Temps are extremly high when running intel burn test!

Discussion in 'Windows 7 Hardware' started by Diablo3, Jun 5, 2012.

  1. Diablo3

    Diablo3 New Member

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    IntelBurnTest. The Max is what it was hitting when i was running the stress test and it idles around mid 40's... and i mean as soon as i started the stress text the cores instantly jumped to 90's :( help please, 2 weeks ago i replaces the thermal paste on my heatsink and it went down from mid 50's to high 30's and when gaming i get 70 - mid 80's :( intel-860 here! thanks for the help in advance ~ Brandon
     
  2. Digerati

    Digerati Fantastic Member
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    If you are overclocking - stop now! At least until this is resolved.

    One of the most common mistakes the less experienced make when applying a new layer of TIM (thermal interface material) is they apply too much! The best heat transfer occurs with metal-to-metal contact. The purpose of the TIM is to ONLY fill (push out the air) the microscopic pits and valleys in the mating surfaces. Any excess TIM is in the way - and actually is counterproductive to the heat transfer process. The second most common mistake is they fail to thoroughly clean the mating surfaces of old TIM before applying new.

    So, it is critical to properly apply as thin a layer of TIM as possible, while still ensuring total coverage (I have a canned text on applying TIM I can post, if you want). Also note while there are basic TIM pads and there are high-end pastes, using TIM is MUCH MORE IMPORTANT than which TIM you use. If the extra 3 or 4° you get from an high-end TIM is all that is keeping the CPU from getting "hot" then you have other problems that need to be addressed first.

    Is the CPU HSF (heatsink fan) assembly properly mounted? With the temps jumping so high, so quickly, with only a few % points of CPU load, it sounds like the heatsink might not be properly seated, or securely clamped down. Assuming it is good, and the CPU fan spins freely, and of course, the case interior (and vents, heatsinks, fans, cards, boards, etc.) is clean of heat-trapping dust), then it is time to look at the case itself.

    The CPU HSF assembly is responsible to "toss" the heat from the CPU up into the "flow" of cool air moving through the case. And it is the case's responsibility to provide that desired front-to-back flow of cool air through the case. I generally recommend at least 2 large (120mm or larger) case fans, (not counting any PSU fans). I like one in front drawing cool air in, and one in back exhausting hot air out (but not all cases support front mounted case fans). Inspect your case interior for fans, and additional (or larger) fan support. If you need to add fans, check your PSU for additional 12V fan (or old style 4-pin molex HD) power connections. Route your cables so their impact on that desired front-to-back air flow is minimal.
     
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  3. catilley1092

    catilley1092 Extraordinary Member

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    In addition to what Digerati has stated, stress testing will cause heating above normal use, as that's the point of testing. When running any type of stress test, all components selected to test will be normally be running at max usage, unless the user chooses otherwise. Not all of these type of tests allows for limiting, so these components will be running at 100% usage.

    Naturally, the hardware will heat a bit during this process.

    Cat
     
  4. Digerati

    Digerati Fantastic Member
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    I agree. But still, with everything running at 100%, temperatures should not be in "hot". Very warm, maybe, but not hot.
     
  5. catilley1092

    catilley1092 Extraordinary Member

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    You're correct, the computer shouldn't be overly hot by testing. If that's the case, at a minimum, a good cleaning is needed. Perhaps more, like a fan slowing due to age, wear & tear. Or re-applying thermal paste. If I have to go through the trouble of cleaning a notebook, this I do anyway, as it takes a lot of disassembling on some models to properly clean.

    And never run a computer, even a tower, directly on carpeting. There are vents on the bottom too.

    Cat
     
  6. Digerati

    Digerati Fantastic Member
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    I am not in favor of that. TIM (thermal interface material) does not go bad, or wear out. It can easily last 10, 15 years or more, if the cured bond is not broken. And the bond will not break, unless the computer bounces off the floor, or the user twists on the heatsink (often to see if it is loose! :cool:). IMO, the only time you need to replace the TIM is every time you pull the HSF. And that should be a rare event.

    I do agree that periodic cleaning of heat trapping dust is essential. I generally recommend a visual inspection monthly, then cleaning as required.

    Note this is why I will never have a case without removable, washable air filters again - I don't enjoy tearing down and lugging my systems outside for cleaning.
     
  7. catilley1092

    catilley1092 Extraordinary Member

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    I had one like you described, the bond was broken. The only bond between the CPU & Heatsink were the screws holding it in place. Once the screws were removed, the heatsink leaned over. This was the notebook (Dell Latitude D610) that we discussed well over a year ago, where the CPU was constantly reaching temps of 100C & crashing.

    You could be very well right, I bought it second hand, it was a business notebook, and was probably thrown around a bit. I've worked with those who opened the rear door & threw the notebook into the seat. After all, computers aren't built to be slung around.

    Once I cleaned it good, re-applied thermal paste, it ran cool again, around the 70C range (max).

    Cat
     

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