Web Sharing option in Windows 7 ?

Discussion in 'Windows 7 Networking' started by amoldindorkar, Mar 1, 2011.

  1. amoldindorkar

    amoldindorkar New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2011
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hi,

    In Windows XP there is option of Web sharing on right clicking on specific folder. How can we make web sharing in windows 7 OS ?
     
    #1 amoldindorkar, Mar 1, 2011
    Last edited: Mar 1, 2011
  2. Mike

    Mike Windows Forum Admin
    Staff Member Premium Supporter

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2005
    Messages:
    8,488
    Likes Received:
    783
    Sharing Windows resources has nothing to do with running a web server. In previous iterations of Windows, such as Windows XP, you could install IIS web server and run it on port 80. This may not be the same type of resource sharing you are talking about. In Windows 7, files, folders, printers, and other peripheral devices can be shared out to other computers on your network. This is accomplished by accessing a folder, right-clicking on it, and choosing the Sharing tab. You can share any printers to your network by right-clicking on the printer to share it out. For so long as your computers are on the same workgroup, you should be able to find these devices.

    In Windows 7, a new option has been instituted called HomeGroups. You can create a HomeGroup to share files easier between systems.

    Here is more information about resource sharing in Windows XP: Microsoft Corporation

    And some information about how to do it in Windows 7: Share files with someone

    If you compare both, you will see that the process has been very much simplified in Windows 7. I hope that this helps answer your question.

    To actually share files over the Internet, you would need to create a public SMB share or run IIS server. It is not recommended to share files off Windows publicly without security in place:

    Internet firewalls can prevent browsing and file sharing

    If you want to share documents, you can investigate Windows Live SkyDrive, for online document storage and file sharing over the Internet. This gives you 25GB of potentially shareable space. I also recommend Dropbox as an extremely reliable alternative.
     
  3. Trouble

    Trouble Noob Whisperer

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2009
    Messages:
    13,845
    Likes Received:
    833
    In addition to Mike's comments above, it's possible that on the XP machine you may have been using some type of third party software similar to HP's "Share to Web" service. I don't remember if that particular product added a menu item to the right click context menu or not but it may have been something like that since it did come as part of the software install packages on many of HP's scanners and AIO (All In One) product offerings.
    SOURCE: http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/document?docname=bpu05216&cc=us&dlc=en&lc=en&jumpid=reg_R1002_USEN
     
  4. Scott Marcus

    Scott Marcus New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2011
    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    0
    "Sharing Windows resources has nothing to do with running a web server."

    You are completely mistaken. If you wish to host a web page from your Windows PC, guess what? You need a web server! The question relates to a feature added to the Windows Shell by IIS that is no longer present in Windows 7.

    "In previous iterations of Windows, such as Windows XP, you could install IIS web server and run it on port 80. This may not be the same type of resource sharing you are talking about. "

    It's exactly what the OP is describing so why does the rest of your reply ignore the very clear question relating to WEB sharing and proceed to explain everything that DOESN'T relate to WEB sharing?
     
    #4 Scott Marcus, Apr 4, 2011
    Last edited: Apr 4, 2011
  5. Scott Marcus

    Scott Marcus New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2011
    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    0
    If you have IIS installed in your copy of XP, a context menu choice called "Sharing & Security" will bring you to a dialog that provides a tab called "Web Sharing" (in addition to the regular "Sharing" tab). This tab allows you to quickly create a virtual directory in IIS for the one that you've right clicked on.
     
  6. sogoodtobe

    sogoodtobe New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2010
    Messages:
    70
    Likes Received:
    2
    How the hell are the guys supposed to know all applications out there, and more precisely the one that gives the right-clicking option "web sharing"?

    I believe the first answers were good as they made some assumptions based on the initial question. I would personally not have enough patience figuring out what the question is actually about. Instead I would point the guy to a website called google and type the words "windows xp web sharing".
     
  7. Scott Marcus

    Scott Marcus New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2011
    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    0
    Because IIS is not just some application. It's a core component of Windows and the original question was perfectly clear: "In Windows XP there is option of Web sharing on right clicking on specific folder.".

    If the people that replied weren't familiar with this feature, then they shouldn't have replied (especially "Mike", who posted completely incorrect statements [Sharing Windows resources has nothing to do with running a web server.]).

    By the way, you know how I found this site/forum/thread? Google. So what's your next piece of "sage" advice?
     
  8. Mike

    Mike Windows Forum Admin
    Staff Member Premium Supporter

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2005
    Messages:
    8,488
    Likes Received:
    783
    That is not a question. The question was "In Windows XP there is option of Web sharing on right clicking on specific folder. How can we make web sharing in windows 7 OS ?" And as for the answer, I certaintly don't profess to have all of them. However, you can see that my response was to either make a public SMB share, look up the actual guide to perform file sharing in Windows, 7, acknowledge that the firewall in Windows 7 may create problems for these types of WAN activities, and I also went on to recommend to other file sharing methods (SkyDrive and Dropbox).

    Now, when I spoke of resource sharing in Windows, I did not mean CPU or memory utilization, or even network utilization as you may have imagined, and this may have been a misclarification on my part. Surely these are definately important factors in hosting a web server. However, while it was possible to install IIS in Windows XP, this functionality has been, quite wisely, recommended for use on Windows Server. More specifically, I was trying to state that the sharing of individual files, folders, and other Windows File Sharing resources did not have much to do with IIS.

    Indeed, after further study, it is possible to install IIS 7 on Windows Vista or Windows 7, however, there are connection limitations; if I am not mistaken similar restrictions existed in Windows XP. Further, running IIS on any client version of Windows would seem to me to be both counterintuitive and counterproductive to the goals of the OP. As you likely know, Scott, most rational individuals (including myself) would not recommend running IIS on Windows client in any kind of production role.

    Further, I state that if you would like to do this you may see this document: Installing IIS 7 on Windows Vista and Windows 7 : Installing IIS 7 : Installing and Configuring IIS 7 : The Official Microsoft IIS Site

    So certainly, resources are allocated, but not Windows File Sharing as I was trying to articulate. Often times I am trafficked with a large amount of data to sort, and this may have been a misnomer on my part. Further study in this area will show you that it is even possible to run Apache and PHP under a Windows client environment. However, what reasons I would have to instruct the OP to even attempt to do this are unclear.

    I hope that you understand that we are not perfect, but we do try to answer questions with some degree of accuracy and a sincere wish to see these questions answered with a satisfactory outcome.
     
  9. Scott Marcus

    Scott Marcus New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2011
    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    0
    Your latest reply further indicates that you continue to miss the entire point and don't fully understand the question, which is why I suggest that those who don't understand the question, shouldn't try to answer them.

    Using IIS on Windows clients has been (for many years) and continues to be extremely commonplace. No one suggested (or even introduced) that this would be for production purposes. Using IIS on a Windows client is extremely useful in small-scale development environments (where servers are not readily available).

    The fact is that you took the name of the feature (Web Sharing) to mean the the OP wanted to share a document to the actual WWW. It's perfectly understandable that you would think that, but if you were familiar with IIS, you'd know that this is not what the Web Sharing feature actually is. It simply takes the directory that was right-clicked on and makes it a virtual directory in IIS.

    You've indicated that you were not talking about CPU, RAM or Network resources (and I did not take your reply to mean those anyway) and then indicate that you were talking about Windows File Sharing, however "Web Sharing" is actually not related to "Windows File Sharing" and WFS has nothing to do with IIS.

    If you knew what this feature is and what it does, you'd know that to share the folder and its documents (the "resources" that you referred to) in this way is absolutely related to IIS, which makes your statement to the contrary incorrect.

    Listen, I'm not trying to be rude, but I've spent nearly 15 years contributing to Microsoft newsgroups and now forums and am simply trying to correct inaccurate information and advise others not to post definitive replies when they don't really understand the question in the first place.

    By the way, the simple answer is that in Windows 7, the Windows Explorer Shell does not have the Web Sharing extention. You must go into IIS via Computer Management and mark the directory as virtual through the IIS Admin tool.
     
  10. Trouble

    Trouble Noob Whisperer

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2009
    Messages:
    13,845
    Likes Received:
    833
    Scott Marcus;
    Hello and welcome to the forums. You participation and contributions as a member of our community is sincerely and greatly appreciated. However it is interesting that the OP (new with only a single post) has not responded to any of the subsequent posted suggestions or possible solutions to his query.
    No one here purports to make any claim to having a definitive reply. We only do our best to comment on any given request for help to the best of our abilities based on our personal knowledge and experience. I actually even created a blog about this issue a while back as I was deeply concerned about some members who seemed to feel that it was not enough to just post a comment directed specifically to the OP's question but seemed to feel it necessary to deride other members honest efforts to provide some help to the best of their personal ability.
    I'm sorry you seem to feel that we somehow fall far short of providing the requisite help that this particular member required, but we always try to do our best while of course also trying to do no harm.
    Kind regards
    Randy
     
    1 person likes this.
  11. Scott Marcus

    Scott Marcus New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2011
    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    0
    Randy & Mike:

    I am not making any commentaries on your intentions or the fact that you are trying to help as you both seem to think that I am. Please try to separate a criticism of one particular thing with a criticism of the entire forum and all those that participate, as there is nothing in any of my posts to suggest this. But, for you and Mike to respond with, essentially: "We try hard to help those who need it." does not mean that posting incorrect information is ok.

    But Randy, when you say "No one purports to make any claim to having a definitive reply.", you are quite mistaken.

    "Sharing Windows resources has nothing to do with running a web server."

    is a definitive reply. To those who know what the question is about and what the answer is, this incorrect definitive reply conveys that Mike is unfamiliar with the question being posed, but would rather post a reply as if he was. It is this and ONLY this that I am commenting on, not your desire and efforts to help. It's one thing to be helpful (and even to get it wrong in the process) and another entirely to make definitive comments when you don't know what's being asked.

    I'm simply suggesting that when you read something that you don't understand, you shouldn't reply with an implied level of knowledge on the subject that you don't have. Sometimes the best reply is a clarifying question.
     
  12. Mike

    Mike Windows Forum Admin
    Staff Member Premium Supporter

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2005
    Messages:
    8,488
    Likes Received:
    783
    Scott, you are free to disagree and articulate your disagreement about the statements I have made. In order to stay on point and maintain some etiquette, it is asked that we follow minimal standards of conduct. I believe the OP was referring to actually hosting NetBIOS/SMB and not running IIS. At no point does he actually ask about running it. However, I still mentioned "resource sharing" to articulate this person's likely desire to run Windows File Sharing through SMB/NetBIOS. With Windows 98 and Windows XP we saw the advent of WebDAV (or Web Distributed Authoring and Versioning). This used OLE and not IIS. It was Microsoft's implementation of RFC4918. This is a protocol that Microsoft, Apple, and many Linux distributions did adopt. Windows UNC conventions created by Microsoft, this allowed Web Sharing folders to be renamed under Windows XP whereas the URL could be converted to a UNC/SMB-type share. This used a WebDAV-redirector service in Windows XP as WebDAV fell out of favor and SMB became the preferred method of file sharing across, at least, LANs.

    That has very little to do with IIS. Since SMB and NetBIOS shares have been a preferred method for file sharing over Windows networks as an alternative to FTP and HTTP protocols, you can look towards "Simple File Sharing" and "Web Sharing" in Windows XP as a likely alternative to installing full blown IIS. To this date, Microsoft still keeps open a public NetBIOS/SMB share for IT specialists to download certain utilities by simply plugging in a \\IP or hostname. The address for this can be plugged in as \\live.sysinternals.com using the Run Command.

    Users of Windows XP Professional were never advised to use IIS to share files over a network, and when the system is not on a domain, it was recommended to enable networking sharing in Explorer and create NetBIOS shares on a workgroup. Even the Help documentation in XP recommended using the Web Publishing Wizard to upload files to online web servers prior to the introduction of online cloud computing file hosting services like Windows Live SkyDrive. When we talk about IIS in Windows XP, we are talking about limited concurrent connections, very lax security, and a constant need for security hardening. We also know that this web server is not the best method for hosting files on a Windows network.

    Once File and Print Sharing is turned on through the Network Setup Wizard in XP, it is possible to share files over a workgroup using Windows Explorer for so long as File and Print Sharing is activated.

    When clicking on "Publish This Folder to the Web" you would be sent to the Web Publishing Wizard.

    The OP was not entirely clear about what he is trying to do: either share a file on the LAN to someone or what. He is describing "web sharing" in Windows XP, which has very little to do with IIS as a right-click mouse option in Windows XP; unless of course IIS is already installed. Of course, in this case, we need more information from the OP, but the type of "resource sharing" I concluded he was talking about was through NetBIOS/SMB/WebDAV. This is the traditional way to share files over a Windows workgroup and even publicly, if so desired, in a Windows environment without Server.

    Microsoft recommends using Routing and Remote Access (RRAS) servers to create a proximity network and secure VPN tunneling if you are going to use "Windows XP" to start hosting websites. I would consider this to be a security nightmare and the definition of absolute insanity. Windows XP is not an operating system that should be used to host a production web server. It is true that I have lacked familiarity with running IIS in Windows XP for security reasons, and here you can see exactly what the OP was likely talking about if he had IIS installed in XP. So in that sense, you may be correct that he was looking to run IIS in Windows 7, which I still would not agree with on principle. However, running it in XP is just a ridiculous, flawed premise at this point. I cannot imagine someone actually using this for production activity.

    As of March 2011, 60.31% of the top web servers use Apache. 19.34% use IIS. Using it in Windows XP is an alien concept to me, so I assumed he wanted to run a NetBIOS share.

    Even Microsoft is running a NetBIOS/SMB share publically for IT professionals to download utilities at \\live.sysinternals.com\

    Nonetheless, because of the archaic nature of this question, I hope that this dialogue has somehow helped the OP in resolving the situation. If that is your intent, and not name calling, such as “you have absolutely no idea what you are talking about” etc, I would like to welcome you to the site and hope you will continue to make these kinds of contributions.

    I will not bias myself towards IIS or do a PR stunt about how great this web server is, when its best used internally and definitely not on Windows XP. Consider hiring two or three security gurus for your new high-profile IIS site, perhaps even an entire department if you're going to go down that route. I like the way its built, but common sense takes precedence in hosting materials.

    I am happy to see Microsoft offering online cloud-based solutions and not suggesting people run web servers off XP machines.

    Take care,
    Mike
     

    Attached Files:

    #12 Mike, Apr 7, 2011
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 7, 2011
  13. Scott Marcus

    Scott Marcus New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2011
    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    0
    "In order to stay on point..."

    Then why does the rest of your last post go on and on about network sharing, standards, the origins of such features in Windows, publishing documents, and statistics on the most popular web servers when this thread is not discussing that? You've just interjected that with your last post and that certainly takes us away from the point here.

    "...and maintain some etiquette, it is asked that we follow minimal standards of conduct."

    Agreed. What's your point? What rules of etiquitte have I broken? I have not called anyone names, nor have I stated anything that was untrue. I simply pointed out your mistake and gave some solid and time-tested advice.

    "I believe the OP was referring to actually hosting NetBIOS/SMB and not running IIS."

    Understood, and that was the root of the problem. If you had just scratched your head and said "Gee, I'm not sure what this guy is talking about because I've never seen that context menu option before and I'm not intimately aware of how IIS integrates with Windows.", maybe you wouldn't have responded with incorrect information and with such certainty. That's all. That's it. No one is saying that you aren't trying to be helpful. Nothing to get all worked up about and nothing to start talking about rules of etiquitte about. It's just some simple advice that will help you be "more helpful" going forward.
     
  14. Mike

    Mike Windows Forum Admin
    Staff Member Premium Supporter

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2005
    Messages:
    8,488
    Likes Received:
    783
    Your points are well taken and constructive criticism is always welcome. I believe that the more information we can provide, the better off other individuals will be in making informed decisions. The thread only becomes useless when we make ourselves the subjects of it, or as you have pointed out, provide accidentally erroneous information. It is my belief that your ability to communicate that an error may have been presented, and doing that clearly, has be very helpful in this thread. It is good that we can provide an abundance of information on this subject and explain the concepts from different perspectives. I believe that friendly discourse regarding any subject can be very beneficial. This can be done in the spirit of providing our own experiences, deductive reasoning, and logic to others.

    I hope that you can see that my goal is to be respectful to both you and those reading this and participating on the site in the future.
     
  15. sogoodtobe

    sogoodtobe New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2010
    Messages:
    70
    Likes Received:
    2
    Interesting how narrow-minded you are. I thought this was specific to linux "penguins" but apparently it is not. IIS is not an application? well great news for you but honestly I don't care whether or not this is a core component in Windows because pretty much everything is a core component of Windows nowadays. That doesn't mean you have to use it or know about it. Especially all those fancy features that don't bring anything good but mass ownage.

    And as you seem to be looking for further sage advice, I think you can now go and save other lost Microsoft souls out there.
     
  16. Scott Marcus

    Scott Marcus New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2011
    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    0
    I'm not sure I understand what your point is? Why does knowing about IIS make me narrow-minded? Why does knowing about IIS mean you have to use it? I never said anything of the sort. Do I seem to be looking for advice? I don't remember asking for any. But, this is a Microsoft Windows Forum, so why wouldn't you expect the topic to largely be about Microsoft products and Microsoft Windows, in particular?
     
  17. Carlo1492

    Carlo1492 New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2012
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Scott,

    I to have an application that I used the "Web Sharing" folder option that was automatically added to folder properties when you installed IIS on 2003 and XP using Internet Explorer as our user interface. We installed Perl and Active server pages in the older OS's and it ran fine. Now that Microsoft has done away with the Web Sharing option and we are testing on Windows 7 and 2008R2 or 2011 I can not get this Bin folder shared with the aliases like we could in the past. Since you understand the Web Sharing issue, and also know that it has nothing to do with file sharing, can you give me directions on how to alias the folder name I want to make my web shared folder? Thank you.
     
  18. Laviniu Campean

    Laviniu Campean New Member

    Joined:
    May 25, 2012
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
  19. Peter Pickle

    Peter Pickle New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2014
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Spot on Scott - keep to the point AND Laviniu Campean - also spot on, why remove something that works great. I used IIS on XP to develop sites using ASP before uploading them.... now it's all gowwwnnnnnn... Another Microsoft magic moment. :)
     

Share This Page

Loading...