Welcome to the Windows 7 Forums

cybercore

New Member
Many thanks for this forum, for many interesting and useful posts. Thanks to all who maintain the server and to all taking part in forums.

Warm wishes. :)
 

xrams

New Member
what's up folks....

Hi Mike and follow fourm members....

I just like to say that your warm welcome is happily received..... I had just bought Vista Ultimate about 5months ago.... due to the fact that my HP sys with Vista home premium (purchased in 2008) was hacked from day one... My sys continued to be hijacked even with the bit-locker only b/c of 3rd party app. weaknesses.... However, now I must say that being a invited beta tester for windows 7.... I've been very much impressed by the refinements....


xrams.....
 

stewagd

New Member
Thanks for the forum and a couple of ?'s

Hi! I'm a SysAd for a medium-sized department in a higher-educational system. Our network consists of 3 sites with 100+ users, 3 small server farms - 1 AD-DC per site - running Win2K3/AD for authentication and shares, Linux for big dbs, web, and some custom app's, and mostly WinXP (some Debian/Ubuntu workstations). We skipped Vista for obvious reasons -- if you've never seen a higher-ed IT budget you might be shocked at how little we get for upgrades/replacements :eek:

Moving to Win7 is going to be quite a process for us since we can't just shutdown all of our lab work to do an en-masse upgrade, can't afford new equipment within the next two budget cycles, and don't have the staff to train employees, staff, and faculty on a whole new way of doing things. Mostly though, it looks like Win7 is designed mostly for consumers -- in fact, I'd say from the previews on the MS site, it's mostly for stay-at-homers who like to do computer-based scrapbooking, web browsing, watching TV and movies on netbooks, playing video games, and just general time-wasting. I really hope I'm wrong but it does NOT look like a business-ready OS like Win2K-Pro and WinXP were when they came out.

Can someone direct me to some resources about using Win7 in a locked-down, AD-GPO-based work environment? I really don't want our faculty coming by to complain that their grad-students are wasting time watching DVDs instead of doing research -- only to find that I can't lock out Media Experience or use the same policy-based features we have in WinXP.

Great forum! Thanks for providing it.

ATB,
Geoff in Gainesville
 

Stevo

New Member
Hi! I'm a SysAd for a medium-sized department in a higher-educational system. Our network consists of 3 sites with 100+ users, 3 small server farms - 1 AD-DC per site - running Win2K3/AD for authentication and shares, Linux for big dbs, web, and some custom app's, and mostly WinXP (some Debian/Ubuntu workstations). We skipped Vista for obvious reasons -- if you've never seen a higher-ed IT budget you might be shocked at how little we get for upgrades/replacements :eek:

Moving to Win7 is going to be quite a process for us since we can't just shutdown all of our lab work to do an en-masse upgrade, can't afford new equipment within the next two budget cycles, and don't have the staff to train employees, staff, and faculty on a whole new way of doing things. Mostly though, it looks like Win7 is designed mostly for consumers -- in fact, I'd say from the previews on the MS site, it's mostly for stay-at-homers who like to do computer-based scrapbooking, web browsing, watching TV and movies on netbooks, playing video games, and just general time-wasting. I really hope I'm wrong but it does NOT look like a business-ready OS like Win2K-Pro and WinXP were when they came out.

Can someone direct me to some resources about using Win7 in a locked-down, AD-GPO-based work environment? I really don't want our faculty coming by to complain that their grad-students are wasting time watching DVDs instead of doing research -- only to find that I can't lock out Media Experience or use the same policy-based features we have in WinXP.

Great forum! Thanks for providing it.

ATB,
Geoff in Gainesville

It's really no different then XP in this case most of what you want to do is found in Local Security Policy where you can set or define access policies. You can also choose to remove certin software, shutdown services, lock out cdrom's & floppies, or customize your own installation disc. You might want to look at the Professional or Enterprize editions as they don't have all of the thrills that Ultimate has.

Win7 is simular to XP in many aspects and is definately business ready unlike Vista.
 

KayaCamilla

New Member
Thumbs up to Windows 7

With the emerging technologies in electronics now like multi-core processors, high definition graphics and widescreen LCDs, it is appropriate that a bundled operating system which will enhance and optimize both interface and usage of this supercomputer be created. With Windows 7, everything is just a click away. From favorites in multimedia up to the basic documents we use for jobs: Windows 7 is the best. Although most softwares are still compatible with XP and Vista, in time, these softwares would also upgrade.
It’s a sham if you have the state-of-the-art hardwares yet you operate with Windows 98. If you really have the affection with lower versions of Windows then I will give you my old Pentium 3 or 4 CPU. Hahaha! Kudos to the makers of Windows 7!


 

maureenberger01

New Member
Windows seven for good

On my very own opinion windows seven is one of the best operating system that Microsoft has been released, it has a very stable performance, and I Install it on my desktop computer and it runs smoothly, this is the one I been waiting for. Also I read a lot of articles on the net prof that Windows seven is one of the best distribution.
here are some of the link:
On Computers Tips: Upgrading to Windows 7 the Easy Way - OS, Software & Networking by ExtremeTech
Best Windows 7 Themes:Free Download & Customization | NeWs Update DownLoad
Powerful Computers
DNR-TV: Round The Web Windows 7 Reviews

This would be some of the site that really prof that Microsoft already learn from Vista downfall.
 

kemical

Windows Forum Admin
Staff member
Premium Supporter
Hi Maureen and welcome to the forum..
Yup, I have to agree, it's the best they've done in a while (well since xp) and I'm sure it's only going to get better with age...:)
 

Bob L Heed

New Member
Wondows OS-7

I'm just here for help wading through this obfuscated Mac clone of an OS. I was impressed at first, but now the bloatware starts showing it's serious flaws. Inability to wake from hibernation, or a short nap. Inability to remove programs completely with PROGRAMS control panel. The program keeps trying to open files after removal and when they no longer appear on list of installed programs. Incompatibility with legacy programs like photoshop. The program originally installed well, but fails to see 900 Gb on scratch disk, a formatting issue?. It won't even start to let me change scratch disk preferences. These seem to be pretty serious things. I'm sure others are having these problems and I can find some patches and work-arounds. I found some good advice here in the past

thanks Bob el Heed
 

Nibiru2012

New Member
Hello to All! New member here!

Just wanted to say Hello! I hope to have a good, rewarding experience here. I have quite a bit of experience with Windows 7 and will to be helpful when I feel I may be of assistance.

Howdy Y'all!

Nibiru2008:)
 

kemical

Windows Forum Admin
Staff member
Premium Supporter
Just wanted to say Hello! I hope to have a good, rewarding experience here. I have quite a bit of experience with Windows 7 and will to be helpful when I feel I may be of assistance.

Howdy Y'all!

Nibiru2008:)

Welcome to the forums Nabiru2012,
glad to have you aboard! :)
 

andylucky

New Member
Windows 7 - 32 or 64 bit

Hi, I'm new here so please be a bit patient.
I've just bought an HP-notebook with Windows 7.
When installing I have the choice between 32 or 64 bit.
I have quite a few programs that I use on my desktop with Windows XP.
Will I be able to use these programs if Windows 7 is installed as 64-bit or should I, install the 32-bit version.

I would very much appreciate an urgent answer as I would like to get the notebook up and running.

Thanks in advance.

PS: you can always send me a reply at andylucky@yahoo.com
Andy
 

kemical

Windows Forum Admin
Staff member
Premium Supporter
Hi andylucky,
many 32bit apps will run in a 64bit os as it does create a kind of virtual 32bit enviroment for them to run in. This is not the case with all of them however and you can the manufacturers web site to see if that particular app will run on a 64bit os or that they have a download that is compatible... I guess if most of your software won't run in 64bit then obviously install the 32bit but 64bit is far more desirable and you'll notice certain things are far faster in 64bit. So if you can always go 64bit..
 

Stransky

New Member
Hi All

I bought the retail version of WIn 7 Premium and performed a clean install after reformatting and I am one happy bunny.
This OS is very very good and has installed everthing, so far, that I have thrown at it. If it doesn't work native then it runs in compatibility mode for XP or Vista. I had to upgrade my Motherboard but then I was gifted a Phenom II 550BE and now I have a triple core CPU@3.66Ghz (Core 2 (3rd) was not stable in Prime 95) and WIn 7 64 runs beautifully. I initially had a problem dual booting with Win XP 64 but a little prog EasyBCD solved that.

Stransky
(Douglas Barr)
 

Hades

New Member
Hi there!

Very first post here, so i suposed i could say hello before starting any kind of questions/conversations.

Cheers to all.
 
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