Win 7 x 64 image

Peterr

Honorable Member
#1
Hello
Iif you use Win 7 imaging, can you both back up the system and also be able to recover a single file or is one or the other?
Do you use the rescue disc to do either or can you use the program itself via Windows?
Thank you
 


Saltgrass

Excellent Member
Microsoft Community Contributor
#2
There are two forms of backup. The first is an image, from which you cannot pull individual files and the second is a file and settings backup, which you can pull files from. You will have to decide which one you need and how ofter.

If you check Windows Help and Support, there is quite a bit of information and even a how-to video under one heading.
 


Peterr

Honorable Member
#3
Hi Salt
I found a comprehensive site.
The firsr part has to do with back up and is in the form of an attachment.
The second is recovery and the notes are from some information I compiled.
Win 7 recovery
A-Backup =select “let me choose” and selectyour files you want backed up besides the ‘system’ you also check off.
B-Recovery
1- Open Recovery by clicking the Startbutton , and then clicking Control Panel.In the search box, type recovery,and then click Recovery.
Click Advanced recoverymethods.
Click Use a system image youcreated earlier to recover your computer, and then follow the steps.
2- F8
3- rescuedisc
----------------------------------------------------------------

It appears that you can select files to be backed up, or not, and also a system image with them.
Would it be accurate to say that you could retrieve a lost file this way if it was lost?
Peter
 


Saltgrass

Excellent Member
Microsoft Community Contributor
#4
I would have to say yes.

I usually use just the image backup. But I did start the other type and noticed it did offer to backup an image and a file/settings set. Anything you could not get form the file backup, you could always just restore the image that contains everything on the system at the time the backup was done on the partitions backed up.
 


Peterr

Honorable Member
#5
That seems to be the case -thank you.
 


nmsuk

Windows Forum Admin
Staff member
Premium Supporter
#6
You can also mount the backup images in Disk Management and then extract just file(s) you want.
 


Peterr

Honorable Member
#7
Can you right click the image in Computr to mount it ?
I am not clear as to how to do as you suggest. I have used disc managemen to rename a disc letter, but that is all.
 


nmsuk

Windows Forum Admin
Staff member
Premium Supporter
#8
ok if you go to Disk Management. Right click on disk management and you can then attach a vhd file and give it a drive letter. Hope this helps.
 


Peterr

Honorable Member
#9
I found a site that showed how to right click on disc management and work with it. Then it said do the same to unmount or remove it afterwards and I assume that is the mounted image.
Is it a good idea to do so if you want not to affect the original image?
 


Last edited:

nmsuk

Windows Forum Admin
Staff member
Premium Supporter
#10
OK If you right click on Computer goto Manage and then storage. Left click Disk Management and then Right click on Disk Management. You shuold see a list of options. Create VHD file, Attach VHD file etc. Attach VHD is the option you want.
 


Peterr

Honorable Member
#11
Hello
I now remember going to Computer and clicking manage - thank you for that route.
Can I simply persue the image under Computer until I find the file I want and then copy to paste it, or does that disturb the oringinal image in case I want to recover?
In other words, click Computer>My Book>the dated image and open the image until I find the file I want. Copy and paste it where I dropped it, or, does that disturb the original image ?
Thank you
 


nmsuk

Windows Forum Admin
Staff member
Premium Supporter
#12
No it won't disturb the image at all.
 


Peterr

Honorable Member
#13
Much appreciated and thank you for the help.
 


nmsuk

Windows Forum Admin
Staff member
Premium Supporter
#14
Not a problem. If you need anymore help you know where we are :)
 


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