Windows 7 Security Settings/Permissions Issues?

#1
Hello, I recently got a new laptop and was eager to setup a wireless network to transfer files from my laptop to my desktop. My laptop is running Win 7 while my desktop is using XP. After I configured the network, file sharing seemed to work perfectly except that on my desktop, I can access the "USERS" folder of my laptop.

So without any knowledge of what I was doing, I altered the security settings of the "USERS" folder and/or my C:\ drive and I believe I pretty much locked myself out of it. I tried to revert the settings (Allow - Full Control) instead of (Deny - Full Control) but it denied me access for changing these settings when I pressed apply.
I then hastily performed a system restore in hopes that it would revert the settings.

I restarted my laptop and everything seemed to be normal as I got my desktop back, but I'm not sure if I still have remnants of the security settings. For the security settings for my "USERS" folder, under "Group or user names" "SYSTEM", "Administrators(xxxxxxxx-PC/Administratiors)" and "Users (xxxxxx-PC\Users)" have Full Control. Only "EVERYONE" has the ability for: read & execute, list folder contents and read.

Something in particular I ran into though was when I had to delete a file that was in the "Program Files" folder. When I attempted to delete a file or folder within "Program Files", I would get 2 messages. The first one being, "Are you sure you want to move this folder to the Recycle Bin, Yes or No". I would click "Yes".
But the after, I get the message with the title "Folder Access Denied" that says, "You'll need to provide administrator permission to delete this folder, Continue, Skip or Cancel". I could press "Continue" and the file would be successfully deleted, but I'm worried that this message shouldn't be here in the first place.

So I'm wondering if I still have bits of the "corrupted" security settings from before and if I can revert them to their default settings. Or if there are screenshots of the default security settings. Or should I post up screenshots of my current settings and run them through you guys.

Also (although off topic), my desktop can access the folders of my laptop for file sharing (when I go to "Network Places), but when I go to network places on my laptop, my desktop does not show up (even though I know they are connected since the desktop can see the laptop and not vise versa).

Any help is appreciated.

Thank you.
 


MikeHawthorne

Essential Member
Microsoft Community Contributor
#2

kaos

Senior Member
#3
you can use my little batch file i created if you wish

drag the MAIN folder with the contents in onto the black command promt screen

hit enter

type your username thats on your pc

hit enter

type grant

hit enter

EASY :) ( I HOPE )
 


Attachments

#4
you can use my little batch file i created if you wish

drag the MAIN folder with the contents in onto the black command promt screen

hit enter

type your username thats on your pc

hit enter

type grant

hit enter

EASY :) ( I HOPE )
Thanks, but what exactly does this batch file do?
 


kaos

Senior Member
#5
sets the permissions to full access

so if it says you dont have permissions, this will sort it ( for that directory )

USE CAREFULLY
 


#6
A little history:
On the very first PC I set up with Vista on it, the new owner was looking over my shoulder while I tried to tweak and tune Vista.
At every turn, UAC was popping its ugly head up on the screen and the man asked me, "Do I have to put up with that crap?".

Well, that was then and this is now. Absolutely NO-One has to put up with UAC.
Or, for that matter the very obnoxious "You don't have permission, blah, blah, blah".

Today there are two little scripts that I run on every Vista or Win-7 install.
"Disable UAC" and "Grant Full Admin Control".

Once the latter is installed, I Grand myself control of every pertinent folder in the PC.
That just takes a lot of the sting out of working with files and folders in Win-7.

I gotta admit, that I really loved Windows 98, because I could do anything I wanted, anytime I wanted.
I could even boot up the PC in DOS and access any file or folder on the HD. Ah the good ol' days! lol

Cheers Mates!
Old Timer :cool:
 


#7
Thanks for the suggestion guys, I really appreciate it.

But one thing though, I was asking if my friends w/ W7 knew anything about this and they also referred me to a program of similar functions. But they told me NOTE to "Grant Full Control" (Or a similar function) to the whole C:\ drive.
Any particular reason?
 


kaos

Senior Member
#8
grant permission to the folderrs u need only giving full permoissions to the entire C: would be increasaed securtity risk...
 


MikeHawthorne

Essential Member
Microsoft Community Contributor
#9
What he said.

I only use it myself when I run into a problem.

I.e, I try and open a folder or delete a file and I get the not allowed message in one form or another.

Then I right click on it and select Grant Full Admin Control and that usually does the trick.

Mike
 


MikeHawthorne

Essential Member
Microsoft Community Contributor
#10
What he said.

I only use it myself when I run into a problem.

I.e, I try and open a folder or delete a file and I get the not allowed message in one form or another.

Then I right click on it and select Grant Full Admin Control and that usually does the trick.

Mike
 


davehc

Essential Member
Premium Supporter
#11
Might as well throw in my bit.
The "grant Admin fuill control" is a copy of "Take ownership". It has the same instructions twice and changes the right click text from "Take Ownership" to G"rant Admin Full Control" Not sure about the bat file, maybe a "once only" program?
But either will alter your registry and give you a right click access to any file or folder, or group thereof. In the zip, I have also included the instruction which also allows you to undo the ownership again, should you wish. It is guaranteed safe but, as previously advised, use with caution as it does give access to you, or anyone else, full rights.
 


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kaos

Senior Member
#12
Might as well throw in my bit.
The "grant Admin fuill control" is a copy of "Take ownership". It is badly copied as it has the same instructions twice. Not sure about the bat file, maybe a "once only" program?
But the Tale ownership, attached, will alter your registry and give you a right click access to any file or folder, or group thereof. In the zip, I have also included the instruction which also allows you to undo the ownership again, should you wish. It is guaranteed safe but, as previously advised, use with caution as it does give access to you, or anyone else, full rights.
same job, not sure what your referring to as a badly copied either.
takeownership and the batch fiel do the same job, no install no alterations to registry , just wat he wants
 


davehc

Essential Member
Premium Supporter
#13
Maybe too strongly worded, I have editied anf taken out the offending words. but. as stated, "Grant full admin control" does as my attached .reg, then duplicates the procedure with the last two paras, and removes the right click "take ownership", just applied, and replaces it with the text "Take full admin control ".
 


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#14
I doubt anyone can Take Ownership of the entire C: drive, except one folder and file at a time.
I once tried to do the root directory and the program would not do it. However you can do single files in the root directory.
When you Take Ownership of an entire folder, you don't have to go back and deal with single files.
The command works with one file at a time, so doing a BIG folder will take a while.

When I first got Disable UAC and Take Ownership, both came with UNDO/Reverse versions.
So what's DONE can also be UN-DONE just as easily. So far, I've never wanted to UNDO anything.

:cool:
 


davehc

Essential Member
Premium Supporter
#15
No reason why you should have to, Oldtimer. You obviously know what you are doing. But for newbies, or unknowledgeable, taking ownership of, for examples, Documents and Settings, and using the contents, would, ultimately, lead to a breakdown of the entire OS. (As it would with any junction or system folders.) Certainly not for the nervous!
 


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