Windows System Protection Window Problem

Discussion in 'Windows 7 Help and Support' started by max53000, Jan 31, 2009.

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  1. max53000

    max53000 New Member

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    Please accept my apology ahead of time for any breach of protocol I may unknowingly commit. I'm a newby to the forum and didn't want to wait any longer than necessary before posting this thread for help with a problem I've just encountered.

    The first thing I did after installing Windows 7 Beta 64 bit was to disable Windows Search Indexing. I learned very quickly that the NTFS only donationware search engine Everything by Voidtools.com was 1,000 times faster and could sort 1,000 times as many entries without hanging as Windows Explorer.

    I proceeded afterward to carefully install drivers and programs, each time setting a restore point so that I could undo any damage before it compounded. Each time it only took about twelve seconds to create a new restore point. After installing Windows 7 64, I had discovered that Restore had been implemented on only the Windows 7 system partition. That was fine with me since I thought it might keep Windows 7 64 restore points from fighting my Windows Vista 32 boot partition restore points.

    About 15 minutes ago, immediately after having completely shut down the computer for thirty seconds for the first time after installation, powered it back on, and rebooted into Windows 7, I discovered that the entire System Protection page was greyed out, all buttons on it were unselectable, and the available restore drive window displayed only single word, "Searching...".

    Until then, Windows7 64 beta had been flawless and stable unlike Windows Vista 32. I had been trying for more than a year to get Vista 32 to run for more than four days on my HP Blackbird computer without a BSOD. Windows 7 hasn't had one BSOD in seven days.

    HP has replaced two defective Asus Striker Extreme motherboards, four failed Corsair Dominator 1066 MHz 1 GB sticks of ram, and recently sent me a new 1100 W power supply to replace the old one which I had noticed measured just 0.2 of a volt below the acceptable minimum value for its 12 volt output. They also agreed to extend my warranty one full year.

    About two hours after the problem appeared and just before I was going to post this thread, I noticed that the "Searching..." had ended, the available restore drives had been found, the greyed out buttons were selectable again, and both other boot-drive partitions including the Vista 32 boot partition now had system restore turned on.

    Then I selected the Configure button and discovered to my surprize that "Turn off system protection" was selected. I immediately set it back to "Restore system settings and previous versions of files", hit OK, and tried without success to find a way to turn on or off system protection on the other two boot drive partitions. It had been easy to do so in Xp and Vista.

    Then because I forgot to select Apply before OK, I discovered that my corrective action hadn't stuck. After reselecting "Turn system restore back on", selecting Apply, and then OK, I concluded that what I had experienced resembled that related by a new thread to the forum about losing either all restore points or all but one restore point.

    But in my case there were still fifteen restore points available. But even with this minor hiccup, I am thankful for the fact that Windows 7 has finally made my hardware perform up to reasonable expectations.
     
    #1 max53000, Jan 31, 2009
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2009
  2. GomJabbar

    GomJabbar Senior Member

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    It appears you are new to posting at forums. That's ok, all of use were newbies at some point. Here is a suggestion to make your posts more readable. Do not post in one long block. Generally, you should start a new paragraph every 2 - 5 lines.

    Note that many forum regulars may not bother to read a single large block of text. The result is that you might be missing out on some good answers for your problem(s). See the following link for excellent guidelines on forum posting.

    Style Guide

     
  3. max53000

    max53000 New Member

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    Thanks GomJabbar for the posting pointer and for giving me an example of a properly composed post. I would like to ask one question if I may?

    Would it be acceptable for me to edit my original thread again to make it more readable? (I already did that once about a minute after the original post, when I discovered I'd left a huge hole in the middle of it.) I would put down "improving readability" as a reason for the edit if I did so.
     
  4. davehc

    davehc Microsoft MVP
    Premium Supporter Microsoft MVP

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    Don't worry M8. I think Iroken has already been in and sorted it. It is perfectly readable. Just hang in and you,ll get plenty of advice to sift through.

    By the way, welcome to the forums, I hope you stay with us.
     
  5. GomJabbar

    GomJabbar Senior Member

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    As long as you have an Edit button that works, you can edit your post. Some forums disable editing after 30 minutes, or after 1 day, or they don't let you edit at all.

    My personal feeling is that if you wait more than a short time, you should make a note at the bottom of the post you are editing explaining the nature of your edit.

    Examples:
    EDIT: Corrected typo.
    EDIT1: Said thingamabob when I meant whirlygig. Corrected.
    EDIT2: Fixed dead link above.
    EDIT3: Improved readability.
     

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