Wireless doesn't work in my room in my new computer but works on my iphone?

Discussion in 'Windows 7 Networking' started by kseh, Aug 10, 2010.

  1. kseh

    kseh New Member

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    I purchased a dell 15r (N5010), and have had it for about 3 days. It is a core i3 2.27Ghz, 4Gb RAM. I did a clean install of the OS to get rid of all the bloatware. I then downloaded the respective drivers from the dell website and the resource CD that came with the laptop. After the clean OS install i started having problems with my connection. The computer will not connect to the wireless connection in my room which is very close to the router, and it will say "Windows was unable to to connect to "xxxx" The thing is that other computers in the house all work with the wireless and are farther away from the router. Also my sisters computer which is a 10.1 Asus netbook connects better to the internet than my $900 one. I can only connect to the internet when I am not in my room, but the thing is, is that even my iPhone works in my room. Also i previously had a desktop computer with a wireless adapter and it would work on my room. All the drivers are updated and theres no problems on the device manager, what could be causing this? Its really annoying me that I can't connect to the internet on my room when any computer can even my iphone or a 10.1 Asus netbook, even when I move it into my room.
     
  2. patcooke

    patcooke Microsoft MVP
    Staff Member Premium Supporter Microsoft MVP

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    It may be that you are too close. Being to close to a wireless signal can be can cause signal distortion and cause frequent disconnects (It's a bit like the distortion effect on your ears sitting too close to a music system!) Try moving further away from the wireless access point.
     
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  3. pcs3657

    pcs3657 New Member

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    1. Choose your wireless equipment

    The first step is to make sure that you have the equipment you need. As you're looking for products in stores or on the Internet, you might notice that you can choose equipment that supports three different wireless networking technologies: 802.11a, 802.11b, and 802.11g. We recommend 802.11g, because it offers excellent performance and is compatible with almost everything.
    Shopping list

    • Broadband Internet connection
    • Wireless router
    • A computer with built-in wireless networking support or a wireless network adapter
    A wireless router
    The router converts the signals coming across your Internet connection into a wireless broadcast, sort of like a cordless phone base station. Be sure to get a wireless router, and not a wireless access point.
    A wireless network adapter
    Network adapters wirelessly connect your computer to your wireless router. If you have a newer computer you may already have wireless capabilities built in. If this is the case, then you will not need a wireless network adapter. If you need to purchase an adapter for a desktop computer, buy a USB wireless network adapter. If you have a laptop, buy a PC card-based network adapter. Make sure that you have one adapter for every computer on your network.
    Note: To make setup easy, choose a network adapter made by the same vendor that made your wireless router. For example, if you find a good price on a Linksys router, choose a Linksys network adapter to go with it. To make shopping even easier, buy a bundle, such as those available from D-Link, Netgear, Linksys, Microsoft, and Buffalo. If you have a desktop computer, make sure that you have an available USB port to plug the wireless network adapter into. If you don't have any open USB ports, buy a hub to add additional ports.

    2. Connect your wireless router

    Since you'll be temporarily disconnected from the Internet, print these instructions before you go any further.
    First, locate your cable modem or DSL modem and unplug it to turn it off.
    Next, connect your wireless router to your modem. Your modem should stay connected directly to the Internet. Later, after you've hooked everything up, your computer will wirelessly connect to your router, and the router will send communications through your modem to the Internet.
    [​IMG]Next, connect your router to your modem:
    Note: The instructions below apply to a Linksys wireless router. The ports on your router may be labeled differently, and the images may look different on your router. Check the documentation that came with your equipment for additional assistance.

    • If you currently have your computer connected directly to your modem: Unplug the network cable from the back of your computer, and plug it into the port labeled Internet, WAN, or WLAN on the back of your router.
    • If you do not currently have a computer connected to the Internet: Plug one end of a network cable (included with your router) into your modem, and plug the other end of the network cable into the Internet, WAN, or WLAN port on your wireless router.
    • If you currently have your computer connected to a router: Unplug the network cable connected to the Internet, WAN, or WLAN port from your current router, and plug this end of the cable into the Internet, WAN, or WLAN port on your wireless router. Then, unplug any other network cables, and plug them into the available ports on your wireless router. You no longer need your original router, because your new wireless router replaces it.
    [​IMG]Next, plug in and turn on your cable or DSL modem. Wait a few minutes to give it time to connect to the Internet, and then plug in and turn on your wireless router. After a minute, the Internet, WAN, or WLAN light on your wireless router should light up, indicating that it has successfully connected to your modem.





    3. Configure your wireless router

    [​IMG]Using the network cable that came with your wireless router, you should temporarily connect your computer to one of the open network ports on your wireless router (any port that isn't labeled Internet, WAN, or WLAN). If you need to, turn your computer on. It should automatically connect to your router.
    Next, open Internet Explorer and type in the address to configure your router.
    You might be prompted for a password. The address and password you use will vary depending on what type of router you have, so refer to the instructions included with your router.
    As a quick reference, this table shows the default addresses, usernames, and passwords for some common router manufacturers.
    Router
    Address
    Username
    Password
    3Com
    http://192.168.1.1
    admin
    admin
    D-Link
    http://192.168.0.1
    admin

    Linksys
    http://192.168.1.1
    admin
    admin
    Microsoft Broadband
    http://192.168.2.1
    admin
    admin
    Netgear
    http://192.168.0.1
    admin
    password
    Internet Explorer will show your router's configuration page. Most of the default settings should be fine, but you should configure three things:

    1. Your wireless network name, known as the SSID. This name identifies your network. You should choose something unique that none of your neighbors will be using.
    2. Wireless encryption (WEP) or Wi-Fi Protected Access (WPA), which help protect your wireless network. For most routers, you will provide a passphrase that your router uses to generate several keys. Make sure your passphrase is unique and long (you don't need to memorize it).
    3. Your administrative password, which controls your wireless network. Just like any other password, it should not be a word that you can find in the dictionary, and it should be a combination of letters, numbers, and symbols. Be sure you can remember this password, because you'll need it if you ever have to change your router's settings.
    The exact steps you follow to configure these settings will vary depending on the type of router you have. After each configuration setting, be sure to click Save Settings, Apply, or OK to save your changes.
    Now, you should disconnect the network cable from your computer.


    4. Connect your computers to the wireless network


    Add a device or computer to a network

    Depending on the operating system your computer is running and whether your network devices support newer technologies, the steps for adding a device or computer to the network will vary. For more information about setting up a network, see Setting up a home network.



    To add a wireless computer running Windows 7 or Windows Vista Service Pack 2 by using a push button


    If your router supports Windows Connect Now (WCN), or Wi‑Fi Protected Setup (WPS), you can add a computer to the network by following these steps:


    • Turn on the computer.
    • Open Connect to a Network by right-clicking the network icon ([​IMG] or [​IMG]) in the notification area.
      A list of networks currently available is displayed.
    • Click your network, and then click Connect.
    • Instead of typing a security key or passphrase, press the Wi‑Fi Protected Setup (WPS) button on the router. The router will automatically set up the computer to connect to the network and apply the network's security settings.

      Windows Connect Now helps you add a computer to the network.


    Note

    WCN sets up the network connection with security turned on by default. You can change the security settings later if desired.







    To add a wireless computer running Windows 7, Windows Vista, or Windows XP by using a USB flash drive


    If your settings are saved to a USB flash drive, you can use the flash drive to add computers to your network. To do so, follow these steps:


    • Log on to the computer that you want to add to the network.
    • Plug the USB flash drive into a USB port on the computer.
    • For a computer running Windows 7 or Windows Vista, in the AutoPlay dialog box, click Wireless Network Setup Wizard.
      For a computer running Windows XP, in the USB flash drive dialog box, click Wireless Network Setup Wizard.
      You might be prompted to restart the computer.


    Note

    To save your wireless network settings to a USB flash drive, insert a USB flash drive into the computer, and then follow these steps:

    • Open Network and Sharing Center by clicking the Start button [​IMG], and then clicking Control Panel. In the search box, type network, and then click Network and Sharing Center.
    • In the left pane, click Manage wireless networks.
    • Right-click the network, click Properties, and then click Copy this network profile to a USB flash drive.
    • Select the USB device, and then click Next.
    • Follow the instructions in the wizard, and then click Close.









    To manually add a wireless computer running Windows 7



    • Log on to the computer.
    • Open Connect to a Network by right-clicking the network icon ([​IMG] or [​IMG]) in the notification area.
    • Choose the wireless network from the list that appears, and then click Connect.
    • Type the network security key or passphrase if you are asked to do so, and then click OK.
      You'll see a confirmation message when you are connected to the network.
    • To confirm that you added the computer, do the following:
      Open Network by clicking the Start button [​IMG], and then clicking Control Panel. In the search box, type network, and then, under Network and Sharing Center, click View network computers and devices.
      You should see icons for the computer you added and for the other computers and devices that are part of the network.


    Note

    If you don't see icons in the Network folder, then network discovery and file sharing might be turned off. For more information, see Enable or disable network discovery.







    To manually add a wireless computer running Windows Vista



    • Log on to the computer.
    • Click the Start button *, and then click Connect To.
    • Choose the wireless network from the list that appears, and then click Connect.
    • Type the network security key or passphrase if you are asked to do so, and then click OK.
      You will see a confirmation message when you are connected to the network.
    • To confirm that you added the computer, do the following:
      Open Network by clicking the Start button , and then clicking Control Panel. In the search box, type network, and then, under Network and Sharing Center, click View network computers and devices.
      You should see icons for the computer you added and for the other computers and devices that are part of the network.


    Note

    If you don't see icons in the Network folder, then network discovery and file sharing might be turned off. To turn network discovery and file sharing on, click the Start button , click Control Panel, click Network and Internet, click Network and Sharing Center, and then, under Sharing and Discovery, change the settings you want.







    To manually add a wireless computer running Windows XP



    • Log on to the computer as an administrator.
    • Click Start, right-click My Computer, and then click Properties.
    • Click the Computer Name tab, and then click Change.
    • If the workgroup name is not WORKGROUP, change the name to WORKGROUP, and then click OK. Otherwise, click Cancel to close the Computer Name Changes dialog box.
      If you have to change the workgroup name, you will be prompted to restart your computer. Restart the computer, and then continue with the steps below.
    • Click Start, click Control Panel, click Network and Internet Connections, and then click Network Connections.
    • Click the wireless network connection icon, and then, under Network Tasks, click View available wireless networks.
    • Choose the wireless network from the list that appears, and then click Connect.




    To add a wired (Ethernet) computer running Windows 7



    • Plug the computer into a hub, switch, or router and then turn it on. (If your home has Ethernet wiring and you have a jack in the room where the computer is, you can plug the computer into the Ethernet jack instead.)
    • To confirm that you added the computer, do the following:
      Open Network by clicking the Start button , and then clicking Control Panel. In the search box, type network, and then, under Network and Sharing Center, click View network computers and devices.
      You should see icons for the computer you added and for the other computers and devices that are part of the network.


    Note

    If you don't see icons in the Network folder, then network discovery and file sharing might be turned off. For more information, see Enable or disable network discovery.







    To add a wired (Ethernet) computer running Windows Vista



    • Plug the computer into a hub, switch, or router and then turn it on. (If your home has Ethernet wiring and you have a jack in the room where the computer is, you can plug the computer into the Ethernet jack instead.)
    • To confirm that you added the computer, do the following:
      Open Network by clicking the Start button , and then clicking Control Panel. In the search box, type network, and then, under Network and Sharing Center, click View network computers and devices.
      You should see icons for the computer you added and for the other computers and devices that are part of the network.

    Note

    If you don't see icons in the Network folder, then network discovery and file sharing might be turned off. To turn network discovery and file sharing on, click the Start button , click Control Panel, click Network and Internet, click Network and Sharing Center, and then, under Sharing and Discovery, change the settings you want.







    To add a wired (Ethernet) computer running Windows XP



    • Plug the computer into a hub, switch, or router and then turn it on. (If your home has Ethernet wiring and you have a jack in the room where the computer is, you can plug the computer into the Ethernet jack instead.)
    • Log on to the computer as an administrator.
    • Click Start, right-click My Computer, and then click Properties.
    • Click the Computer Name tab, and then click Change.
    • If the workgroup name is not WORKGROUP, change the name to WORKGROUP, and then click OK.
      If you had to change the workgroup name, you will be prompted to restart your computer. Restart the computer, and then continue with the steps below.
    • click Start, and then click My Network Places.
    • In the left pane, under Network Tasks, click View workgroup computers.
    • Choose the computer from the list that appears, and then click Connect.




    To add a wireless device


    To add a Bluetooth enabled phone, keyboard, mouse, or other wireless device to your computer, follow the instructions in Connect to Bluetooth and other wireless or network devices. To add a wireless device to your network, such as a wireless printer or print server, follow these steps:


    • Turn on the device.
    • Follow the instructions that came with the device to add it to your network.
    • When you're finished adding the device, log on to a network computer.
    • To confirm that you added the device, do the following:
      Open Network by clicking the Start button , and then clicking Control Panel. In the search box, type network, and then, under Network and Sharing Center, click View network computers and devices.
      You should see an icon for the device. If the device is a printer, you might need to enable printer sharing so that other computers on the network can use it.


    Note

    If you don't see icons in the Network folder, then network discovery and file sharing might be turned off. For more information, see Enable or disable network discovery.





    To add a wired device


    • Turn on the device and plug it into a hub, switch, router or into a computer that's plugged into a hub, switch, or router. The device should now be connected to the network.
    • To confirm that you added the device, do the following:
      Open Network by clicking the Start button , and then clicking Control Panel. In the search box, type network, and then, under Network and Sharing Center, click View network computers and devices.
      You should see an icon for the device. If the device is a printer, you might need to enable printer sharing so that other computers on the network can use it.


    Note

    If you don't see icons in the Network folder, then network discovery and file sharing might be turned off. For more information, see Enable or disable network discovery.
     
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  4. bassfisher6522

    bassfisher6522 Essential Member

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    There could have been some sort of corruption of the registry during the reinstall of the OS. It might be worth another attempt at it. I've had an issue arise a few times my self after a reinstall and then had to turn right around and do it again. Stuff like this just happens form time to time and only sure way to fix it is a reinstall. Probably not what you wanted to here.
     

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