Wireless network won't stay connected!!

Discussion in 'Windows 7 Networking' started by hg3300, May 29, 2012.

  1. hg3300

    hg3300 New Member

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    I have tried fixing the problem various ways but nothing seems to be working. The router is two floors down and sometimes I have trouble connecting, other times it's connected and works. There's no rhyme or reason for periods where it disconnects.

    I've done manual reconnection (NEVER WORKS) and Troubleshooting (hardly ever works). I've tried disabling and reenabling the wireless and restarting the computer. Nothing can seem to prevent these problems from happening. Sometimes the network won't even show up!

    I can't fathom how it's possible to SOMETIMES detect the network and SOMETIMES connect to it. I've thought of purchasing a repeating (quite pricey if you ask me) or perhaps using an antenna extension cable. Not sure either would be successful in alleviating my problem.

    Finally, and the most odd thing, is that when the router was in the basement, I actually got a better signal even though it was LOWER than before. Not sure if this was because it was connected directly to the phone box, but the router is back on the first floor and the problem persists daily.

    It's pissing me off, quite frankly. What can I do to prevent my computer, antenna, and/or router from sailing out the window to their almost certain demise?
     
  2. patcooke

    patcooke Microsoft MVP
    Staff Member Premium Supporter Microsoft MVP

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    There are a few points you need to consider. First you need to distinguish between problems of connection between the pc and the router (a local wifi issue) and the connection between the router and your ISP (a wan issue). The connection between your router and ISP can be seriously affected by the length of the connecting cable between your router and the service point - this should be as short as possible. Regarding connection between your pc and the router the primary consideration is the quality of the signal and tis may be affected by two things - distance and the nature of any obstruction between the two - obstructions such as walls etc can sometimes mean that being closer to the signal does not necessarily imply a better signal. The signal quality may also be affected by interference from other wireless devices in the area and it may help to try changing the wireless channel which the router is using. If necessary either a repeater or external antena could help - which you go for depends on the underlying cause of the problem.
     
  3. Saltgrass

    Saltgrass Excellent Member
    Microsoft Community Contributor

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    As Pat's very good response states, there are several things that might be effecting your situation. But you can eliminate them by using some easy assessment tools.

    Your wireless connection should show signal strength, just by clicking the wireless icon. There may also be a site survey ability on your computer's wireless adapter. Is the signal strength comparable to the basement location, or does it seem to drop off?

    If you are using DSL, a dirty line can cause static and really mess with the connection. If you need to, you can run a phone line directly from the basement connection to the upstairs one for testing.

    The Network and Sharing Center will show you where you are loosing connectivity. Some DSL Routers also have an option to "Stay Alive", which keeps the connection on during periods of low usage.

    If it turne out to be a Wireless signal problem, you might be able to find a wireless signal meter device for testing, or just move your computer around to see where the signal strength is the best.
     
  4. hg3300

    hg3300 New Member

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    Oddly enough, the wireless seems to have issues with flash-intensive sites, like Livestream or Scrabble on Facebook. Not sure if this is the case but it disconnects randomly most of the time and seemingly more frequently when on those sites.

    My parents supposedly have no problem with the wireless (their laptop is a floor below).

    Also, the wireless adapter picks up at least one other wireless connection that I don't have access to. I have reason to believe that THIS connection would stay connected, as it is always visible, unlike the connection I have access to (it disconnects randomly and doesn't show up in wireless networks even if I disable/reenable the adapter several times)

    I think the problem happens more commonly at night; not sure why this would be.

    I did purchase an extension cable so I've tried various places around the room; the adapter has disconnected randomly since then.

    tl;dr? My adapter picks up other connections fine, but this connection, although it's usually at least 3 bars (sometimes 2) has issues with staying connected.
     
  5. ITSSJFA

    ITSSJFA New Member

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    Hi there,

    Ok your wifi signal is not strong enough that is why the flash websites are
    unstable you can add another router and use it as a relay or go for the
    easy solution buy a Router N mode you wil get a much better signal those
    are the better ones with less interferance and better range

    Best Regards
     
    #5 ITSSJFA, Jul 31, 2012
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2012
  6. DrBogo

    DrBogo New Member

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    Hello,

    I'm a relative noob when it comes to computing. However, I do have quite a knowledge base in radio; both practical and theoretical.

    Nothing can be more frustrating than a problem which comes and goes. Especially when the fix is several floors away. I tend to agree with ITSSJFA ; the signal is too weak. If your budget allows, a used Linksys N router with dd-wrt firmware and a couple of hi-gain antennas should do the trick. I suggest the dd-wrt firmware because it allows the router's signal strength to be raised or lowered as needed. Additionally, with dd-wrt the router transmit/receive channel is user adjustable. Then you can get away from the more congested frequencies(channels). How will you know which frequencies are crowded? Again, the dd-wrt firmware gives the router the ability to scan the airwaves and through its web GUI let the operator "see" the other routers, their signal strength, type of encryption and which channel they're operating. I realize this is a simplistic explanation, therefore, hg3300, pm me if you want a complete explanation and router recommendations.

    Good Nite,

    DrBogo
     

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