How hot is too hot for CPU? Sudden reboots?

pstein

Extraordinary Member
#1
During the last two weeks I observed sudden reboots of my Win 7 system.
In various, different situations the system crashed suddenly and starts afterwards automatically a reboot.

I verified possible software configurations and tracked it down to some hardware issues.
The only reason I can think of (currently) is that the CPU is getting too hot and triggers a self-protecting reboot.
Can this be?

May be the CPU fan is getting too much dust during the last months and does not offer enough cooling especially in heavy CPU load situations.

How hot is too hot for an Intel Core i5-2400 CPU?

Have a look at the attached snapshot of the famous CPUID HWMonitor tool.
Which of the mayn values is the important temperature value here ?

Or is motherboard the culprit?

Whats the critical threshold?
Thx
Peter
 


Attachments

kemical

Windows Forum Admin
Staff member
Premium Supporter
Microsoft MVP
#2
temp.JPG


Your temps don't look that bad, certainly not enough to crash it.

However look at this snip:
temp 2.JPG


CPUTIN = System Temperature Index. CPUTIN is different from CoreTemp. CoreTemp is the sensor on the processor while CPUTIN is motherboard CPU temp sensor.

AUXTIN is the power supply temp sensor if there is one.

If your not getting enough airflow you might see this. Try taking the side panel off and see what the temps are then.
What is a safe operating temperature for the core i5 2400 3.1ghz processor?

It's always worth cleaning out any dust build up and the difference can sometimes be quite surprising.
 


Last edited:

Digerati

Fantastic Member
Microsoft MVP
#3
I agree with kemical that your temps look good there, but if those are idle temps, there is not much head room for when the CPU is tasked hard.
May be the CPU fan is getting too much dust during the last months and does not offer enough cooling especially in heavy CPU load situations.
This concerns me a bit. You say "may be"? This should be easy to tell, just look! Is the interior covered with heat-trapping dust? If so, it needs to be cleaned. I take my computers outside and blast them compressed air. Just be sure to hold the fans stationary (I use a wooden Popsicle/glue stick) to avoid over spinning them which can ruin the bearings.

As noted through kemical's link and as seen here, the Tcase maximum allowed for your i5 is 72.6°C so you have room to spare.

Note it is the case's responsibility to provide sufficient air flow through the case. The CPU fan need only toss the CPU's heat into that air flow. So you may consider adding another case fan if your case supports another. If not, consider a larger fan (again if case supports it) or replacing current case fan(s) with a fan that moves more air (has a higher CFM rating).

If your interior is clean, I agree to open the side panel but recommend blasting a desk fan in there to see what happens. Just removing the side panel can disrupt (totally stop) the flow of air through the case and hot spots can occur.

Note too the sudden shutdowns can be caused by many things - including a failing power supply or bad RAM.
 


nmsuk

Windows Forum Admin
Staff member
Premium Supporter
#4
The CPUIN value got to 93c, which is far from optimal or even good. That should be lower than Tcase.
 


Neemobeer

Windows Forum Team
Staff member
#5
Agreed with nmsuk the 93C is way way too high, should not be going over 75C. This is most likely due to a bad seal between the CPU and heat sink with thermal paste or pad.
 


Digerati

Fantastic Member
Microsoft MVP
#6
Oops! :oops: Sorry! I missed that. Agreed - 93°C is too hot.
 


kemical

Windows Forum Admin
Staff member
Premium Supporter
Microsoft MVP
#7
However look at this snip:


CPUTIN = System Temperature Index. CPUTIN is different from CoreTemp. CoreTemp is the sensor on the processor while CPUTIN is motherboard CPU temp sensor.

AUXTIN is the power supply temp sensor if there is one.
Yup it was pointed it out earlier......
 


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