Trouble with MS multimedia keyboard 1.0a (PS/2 connection)

asafaq

Honorable Member
#1
Hello forum,

The keyboard works fine (all keys function) but today some Start+shortcuts have stopped working, some work and some do not.
Start+arrows right, left and down work but Start+Up does not.
Start+E opens explorer, Start+R does not open Run menu.
How could I use all Start shorcuts?

* I have installed MS Intellitype Pro 7.0 (Newer versions do not support PS/2)
 


Digerati

Fantastic Member
Microsoft MVP
#2
Just to make sure everyone is on the same page, the "Windows" key (or "Windows Logo" key) is the preferred term. "Start" is rarely used to describe the "Windows" key. This is important because some keyboards actually have a key labeled "Start" that is pre-programmed to open the Start Menu.

Back to your problem. Did it just start?

Clearly, your "Windows" key does work or none of those keyboard shortcuts would work.

Have you done a "cold" reboot? By "cold", I mean to power down and unplug the computer from the wall (remove battery if a notebook) for about a minute. Then connect power and boot and see if it works.

This can also be caused simply by a dirty keyboard. All that was needed was turning the keyboard upside down and gently tapping its edge on the edge of your desk to knock loose all those cookies and chip crumbs, dust and hair that has been lodged under the keys. Pressing every single key a few times (best when computer is powered down) to make sure none are stuck can help too.

If that does not work, try a different keyboard and see if the problem remains. If it does, then you know the problem is with the computer and not your keyboard.

See also: Some shortcuts with Windows logo key do not work
 


asafaq

Honorable Member
#3
Hi thank you very much for your reply.

1. "Start" is written on the key next to the windows icon, I'm fine with calling it windows key.
2. Just started, all shortcuts (That I normally use) worked.
3. Maybe cold reboot (Desktop), I don't exactly remember, I woke the PC from sleep, and shut it down to restart it but I didn't unplug, it's a PC afterall. This happened before I posted here and that's when the issue appeared.
4. Keyboard is rather clean, but isn't new.
5. I have used a different USB keyboard in the previous month and this issue never occurred.
6. I have covered the link you've included, after a clean boot - I think I can conclude this issue, Win+R still didn't work, I kept pressing it until it worked once, so this is probably just a keyboard going bad issue. Thank you for walking me through.
 


asafaq

Honorable Member
#4
Ok, I've made new progress, all shortcuts works, BUT, flow of press-win press-key release-win release-key has to be slow and perfect. Which never in years of computing have I found myself having to do this.
 


Digerati

Fantastic Member
Microsoft MVP
#5
1. "Start" is written on the key next to the windows icon
Interesting. I've got 6 MS keyboards here and none say that. But that does not mean anything. I note you said PS/2 so yours is likely pretty old.
but I didn't unplug, it's a PC afterall.
The thing to note is the ATX Form Factor standard requires all ATX compliant power supplies for PCs continue to supply +5Vsb standby voltage to several points on the motherboard whenever the PSU is plugged into the wall (and if equipped, the master power switch on the back is set to on or 1). So when you shutdown your computer, you really are just putting it in standby mode, not totally powering it off. This standby voltage is what allows us to press a keyboard key, or wiggle the mouse to wake the computer. But this voltage can also keep some possibly corrupt settings alive. So removing power completely by unplugging ensures all voltages are removed and thus ensures a total (cold) reboot.

It would seem through your #5 and #6 above that your troubleshooting steps identified the problem to your failing keyboard. This is verified by the fact a second keyboard worked fine. So it seems it is time to shop for a new keyboard.

I don't know who makes the keyboards and mice for Microsoft, but I really like them. On my two main computers here, I have the Microsoft Comfort 5050 Keyboard and Mouse Set. The curved keyboard and built-in wrist rest are easy on my aging wrists in terms of RSI problems. And universal (not contoured) mouse feel great. This is important for me because while right-handed, I use my mouse with my left hand.

That said, keyboards and mice are HIDs (human interface devices) and every human is a unique creature. These HIDs are extensions of our own, unique hands. As such, what feels great at the ends of my hands may feel awkward or even painful at the ends of yours. So while I can comment on the construction, reliability, key-press feel, mouse "tracking" and style, only you can decide which keyboard (and mouse) is right for you. So you really do need to find a computer store and play touchy-feely with these devices yourself. Try to position them at the same height as your current desk or keyboard tray. And remember, the store floor models have probably been abused. Oh, and take some hand-sanitizer with you! +o(

Being a keyboard and mouse "set" is nice because they share the same USB dongle, taking up just one USB port. I have seen up to 6 of these wireless sets used in the same office and there were no problems of interference between them.

The only downside is the same with all wireless keyboards and mice - batteries. This is one area where I strongly recommend the use of rechargeable batteries. On this computer, which is used heavily for 4 - 6 hours every day, I have to replace the batteries about every 5 months.
 


asafaq

Honorable Member
#6
Interesting. I've got 6 MS keyboards here and none say that. But that does not mean anything. I note you said PS/2 so yours is likely pretty old.

The thing to note is the ATX Form Factor standard requires all ATX compliant power supplies for PCs continue to supply +5Vsb standby voltage to several points on the motherboard whenever the PSU is plugged into the wall (and if equipped, the master power switch on the back is set to on or 1). So when you shutdown your computer, you really are just putting it in standby mode, not totally powering it off. This standby voltage is what allows us to press a keyboard key, or wiggle the mouse to wake the computer. But this voltage can also keep some possibly corrupt settings alive. So removing power completely by unplugging ensures all voltages are removed and thus ensures a total (cold) reboot.

It would seem through your #5 and #6 above that your troubleshooting steps identified the problem to your failing keyboard. This is verified by the fact a second keyboard worked fine. So it seems it is time to shop for a new keyboard.

I don't know who makes the keyboards and mice for Microsoft, but I really like them. On my two main computers here, I have the Microsoft Comfort 5050 Keyboard and Mouse Set. The curved keyboard and built-in wrist rest are easy on my aging wrists in terms of RSI problems. And universal (not contoured) mouse feel great. This is important for me because while right-handed, I use my mouse with my left hand.

That said, keyboards and mice are HIDs (human interface devices) and every human is a unique creature. These HIDs are extensions of our own, unique hands. As such, what feels great at the ends of my hands may feel awkward or even painful at the ends of yours. So while I can comment on the construction, reliability, key-press feel, mouse "tracking" and style, only you can decide which keyboard (and mouse) is right for you. So you really do need to find a computer store and play touchy-feely with these devices yourself. Try to position them at the same height as your current desk or keyboard tray. And remember, the store floor models have probably been abused. Oh, and take some hand-sanitizer with you! +o(

Being a keyboard and mouse "set" is nice because they share the same USB dongle, taking up just one USB port. I have seen up to 6 of these wireless sets used in the same office and there were no problems of interference between them.

The only downside is the same with all wireless keyboards and mice - batteries. This is one area where I strongly recommend the use of rechargeable batteries. On this computer, which is used heavily for 4 - 6 hours every day, I have to replace the batteries about every 5 months.
Thank you very much.
 


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