Autostart with Admin Priv

Discussion in 'Windows 7 Help and Support' started by edbro, Jun 20, 2009.

  1. edbro

    edbro New Member

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    I am trying to autostart a program with admin privileges using the task scheduler trick outlined here:
    Make Vista launch UAC restricted programs at startup with Task Scheduler | Microsoft Windows | TechRepublic.com
    But, I'm running into a problem. The program is Everything Search Engine. When I start it from Task Scheduler with admin rights the program is not visible to me in my standard user account. I can see it running in task manager if I select "Show processes from all users".

    How can I make visible a program that was started in this manner? The trigger I have in Task Scheduler is Logon of my Standard User acct.
     
  2. reghakr

    reghakr Excellent Member

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    That is an excellent program, but why do you need admin rights?

    Why not start it from the Run key in the registry or from the Startup folder.

    You can set UAC to Never notify as long as you have good anti-virus, spyware detector, and/or personal firewall installed.

    The Task Scheduler already has enough unnecessary program it runs on a set basis.:)
     
  3. Tepid

    Tepid New Member

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    I have been searching for an answer to this for a long time myself. Not that program, but others.
    Any other method than Task Sched is a trip into breaking UAC, which may be possible using extreme circumstances (very convoluted way involving other already broken apps, etc.).

    It can not be done through command line (or batch file),,, a VB Script MIGHT have a routine to do it, if I recall, but it wasn't pretty if I remember correctly.

    What it sounds like to me for your problem, is that the GUI is not starting, only the services.
    You might try a second task to start it again and see if that one will start the GUI.

    Try, after logging in, if you open the app, does it start then without prompting?
    If it does, then you might be able to place it is startup and it should/may open after the task has run first.

    I would send an email or post or something to the dev's of the app and see if they can fix it.
    It would be their issue, i think.

    Scratch all that... I just tested it and it works fine for me.
    See my next post when I finish it.
     
    #3 Tepid, Jun 20, 2009
    Last edited: Jun 20, 2009
  4. edbro

    edbro New Member

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    Wouldn't I have to disable UAC notifications across the board? Or, is it possible to change it on a program by program basis?

    I tried turning off notifications just now anyways. It still asked me for my admin password on program start.
     
  5. reghakr

    reghakr Excellent Member

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    Did you restart?

    I just added it to the CURRENT_USER branch of the registry, but I'll need to shutdown and restart and see if I get the GUI.

    yes, it popped up right away.

    Not sure why you need to run this through task Scheduler or the registry, especially when there's a Start Everything at System Startup in the options.:confused:

    Why not just create a shortcut or pin it to the taskbar?
     
    #5 reghakr, Jun 20, 2009
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 20, 2009
  6. edbro

    edbro New Member

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    Okay, this is weird (to me). I turned off notifications and rebooted back into my std user account. I lost access to "C:\program files (x86)". Well, I could navigate to it but I couldn't write to it. Find and Run Robot, which autostarts complained that it couldn't write some db file. That was my first clue. Then I tried running Everything. It started without the admin prompt but it couldn't find anything and had something in it's status bar about not being able to write a db.

    I logged back into admin account and set UAC back to notify, then rebooted. All worked normally now except Everything required and admin password on start. Just to see, I again turned off UAC notifications, rebooted and once again, I lost access to Program Files (x86). Turn notifications back on, rebooted, and gained access.

    So, what does turning off notifications have to do with losing write access from my std user account?
     
  7. edbro

    edbro New Member

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    Because I don't want to circumvent built in protection just to autostart one program without a password prompt.
     
  8. reghakr

    reghakr Excellent Member

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    Try right-clicking on the x86 directory, choose properties, click the Security tab, click the Edit button, select you user name in the list and select Full Control.
     
  9. Tepid

    Tepid New Member

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    The reason for the task is, the program requires elevated privileges to run.
    If put in startup, or a run key, it will still prompt to run.

    Modifying UAC, should never be an option to run any program, ever, ever, ever. Never ever.

    I do not believe I did anything special. It does popup on the desktop for me at login.
    I would have you check the hidden icons in systray incase it is minimizing there on startup.

    Task Schedular

    General:
    Run Only When user is logged on
    Run with highest priviledges
    Hidden is unchecked -------------- (Make sure this is not checked)
    Configure for: Windows 7, blah blah

    Trigger:
    At Log On
    Any User
    Enabled

    Conditions:
    Everything is unchcked, no settings

    Settings:
    Allow task to be run on demand
    If the running task does not end when requested, force it to stop
    Do not start a new instance
     
  10. edbro

    edbro New Member

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    I tried that and it wouldn't let me. While logged into my administrator account I tried to give Full Control to my Std User account. Windows came back and said:
    "An error occured while applying security information to: C:\program files (x86) Access is denied. "

    I tried doing it from the std user account and the Admin account. Windows refused to allow it. It is this kind of crap that caused me to give up Vista for XP. Win7 is better but still pretty frustrating.
     
  11. reghakr

    reghakr Excellent Member

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    did you enable the Hidden Administrative account.........Is that what you're referring to when you speak of administrative account?

    is your standard account a limited account?
     
    #11 reghakr, Jun 20, 2009
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 20, 2009
  12. edbro

    edbro New Member

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    Not sure what you mean by hidden admin. I have 3 accounts: my main acct, which I changed to be a "Standard User", an admin account with admin privileges and Guest Acct.

    I had to create the Admin acct when I changed my main logon to be a std user. Are you suggesting there is yet another admin account?
     
  13. reghakr

    reghakr Excellent Member

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    Yes, but you don't need it.

    Maybe I'm missing siomething here, but why would you set your standard account as a standard user?
     
  14. Tepid

    Tepid New Member

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    As a standard user, you can not set permissions on anything but your own created stuff.
    Standard Account is a Limited Account.

    I tested the this and I am able to open program files, etc. as a standard user with UAC to Never
    I would recreate the Standard User Account, could be a corrupt profile/account. Shich could explain the issue you are having with Tasksched.

    Start with a brand new account.
     
    #14 Tepid, Jun 20, 2009
    Last edited: Jun 20, 2009
  15. edbro

    edbro New Member

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    Cuz I don't know what the heck I'm doing. I'm trying to follow Microsoft's recommendation of running mainly in a Std user account instead of an admin account.
     
  16. Tepid

    Tepid New Member

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    well,, yes,, for the most part you should. The nice thing about UAC and Admin Account is.
    You are running as a standard user with elevated privileges. There is however a full blown admin account that you can also use, and turn off UAC and essentially run as you do on XP. Wide Open.

    But, for the most part, you should be running as a standard user.
    However, (here comes the contradiction), the Admin account with UAC enabled is ok to use also.

    Standard user is mostly for the kids, people you don;t want messing with your system, the ability to set Parental Controls from Control Panel. If you are the only user, Admin with UAC enabled is enough.
     
  17. reghakr

    reghakr Excellent Member

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    I really don't know where MS points this out and who believes Microsoft recommendations anyway?

    I don't know of anyone who has a standard user account.

    These accounts should be used for your children perhaps, if you want to limit them.

    You yourself should have full access to all features of the OS by simply turning off UAC.

    What anti-virus program, spyware detector, or personal firewall are you using?

    Sorry Tepid, but I have to disagree with your UAC reccommendation......................

    IMHO UAC sucks.

    I just did a search for is UAC useless, huge amount of hits

    I search is UAC good, large number of hits telling you how to turn it off.

    The very first thing I do when I install Vista or Windows7 id turn off UAC completely because I know I have adequate protection.
     
    #17 reghakr, Jun 20, 2009
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 20, 2009
  18. Tepid

    Tepid New Member

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    I am going to tell you that you are wrong,, you can disagree all day,,, but you are 100% wrong.

    People don't like change. That is the largest problem with UAC.

    They want to run wide open as they do in XP. rrrrr wrong answer.

    Search MS on the run as issue, you will find it.
    If you have ever taken the XP MCP class, it is highly recommended, not forced, but talked about.

    This is the problem with XP. Standard User and using the Run As for Admin privledges was never enforced or discussed much, but highly recommended in many areas of IT (eventhough everyone ignores it).
    This is also why the large majority of software and drivers were broken in Vista from XP, no adherence to running as a standard user. I can atest to this as I repackaged software for a long time to run in a locked down XP desktop.

    If the majority of XP users ran that way, the largest, HUGE, majority of viruses/maleware/spyware would not exist as there would be no reason to write such easy code to infect a system, they would have to be far more sophisticated and use social engineering tactics far more sophisticated than they do now. This is why I advise people to not turn it off.

    This is a problem that MS is trying to rectify, hence the reason for UAC.
    Trust me, it wouldn't exist otherwise.

    Those that don't like it, just don't like it, it is not causing people problems on it's own.
    It is more of an annoyance to most people than a real problem preventing programs from running.
     
    #18 Tepid, Jun 20, 2009
    Last edited: Jun 20, 2009
  19. reghakr

    reghakr Excellent Member

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    You're right, I'm still disagreeing.:)

    I don't have any Microsoft certs, but I've been flown to Seattle for training from the public library I worked at. We learned all about Group Policy and some manual editing of the registry to lock down our public access computers.

    I'm no Microsoft basher either, as I've only used Linux on occasion. I am a Windows guy, simple as that, but truthfully I could give a damn about what Microsoft recommends.

    We'd all be in huge trouble if we all abided by their recommendations.

    Problems with XP? XP was loved by sysadmins, Vista was shunned by corporations and governments.

    Viruses/malware/spyware are always going to exist, no matter what. You think this is going to stop the script kiddies?

    For inexperienced users, OK, but again and again, if you have adequate protection there is no need for it

    For the record, I have admired most of your postings, well thought out and intelligent
     
  20. Tepid

    Tepid New Member

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    It can and does hinder them a great deal, yes.
    The Malware and Spyware and alot of viruses that exist today won't run or infiltrate a system that is used by a standard user that uses elevated privileges only when needed. With or without Anti-whatever. It's just a simple fact, they won't have access to parts of the system they require.

    XP was heavily shunned in the beginning by these very same groups in favor of Win 2000 and NT4 by some.

    The biggest problem with Vista was change again. Most software that would not run with UAC was due to coding by those dev's. Large majority of software works just fine.

    2nd, UAC shocked and scared a lot of people, they are starting to understand it more and be more accepting.

    3rd, none of the big OEM manufactureres of hardware/software, PC Dealers (Dell, HP, Sony, etc.) were not ready (or they just didn't want to prepare for it as they assumed Vista would be as bad as ME, which it is not). They didn't prepare, they had ample time to be ready, as much time, if not more than with Win7. These groups can take the largest ammount of blame. With number 4

    4th, the most aggregis of all of them,,, The Big OEM's (Dell, HP, Sony, etc.) sold crap systems with 512M of ram and low end celerons with Vista on them, knowing full well it was going to be shit. But, people wanted to save money and have the latest OS. These OEM's should have told them no, we can't sell you a system with those specs and vista, you can get it with XP. At the time, you could order either.

    I also sold PC's for a while and would never sell anyone a PC with those specs.
    Sure, Vista will run, till you install your first app (usually Norton 360 or Mcafee {crap} from those OEM's) then puke. Then people would blame Vista.

    Alot of so called Vista problems were not caused by Vista being Vista.
    It's shotty hardware and not ready software/drivers etc. and end users.

    I have yet to have Vista BSOD, Lockup, Crash, cause problems that I did not do myself, knowing I was about to make something bad happen.

    Infact, I have an aunt and uncle, that I sold a vista system to, I still talk to them, and insist they call me if they have problems. I don't hear from them, they surf the internet and use email mostly, but they don't have problems. And when I ask, everything is running fine. They know nothing about PC's, OS's or anything, if they can use Vista with UAC and not complain or have issues? hmmm.
     
    #20 Tepid, Jun 20, 2009
    Last edited: Jun 20, 2009

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