can UAC be partially disabled?

Discussion in 'Windows 7 Help and Support' started by giltheissen, May 2, 2009.

  1. giltheissen

    giltheissen New Member

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    There are a few applications - like Everest - that continue to require UAC permission every time I run them. I know how to ease and even shut off UAC permissions on a global level, but what if I want to leave the global settings alone and eliminate the extra UAC window for just one or two apps I trust? Can this be done?
    Gil Theissen
     
  2. reghakr

    reghakr Excellent Member

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    Truthfully, I have never seen this happen.

    I disabled UAC immediately after installing Vista about 2 years ago, and immediately shut it off when i installed Windows 7 and never had a problem with UAC.
    Have you tried Run As Administrator?
     
    john3347 and (deleted member) like this.
  3. john3347

    john3347 Extraordinary Member
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    UAC General comments

    Two things about UAC that many users do not seem to grasp are, No. 1: UAC does not "scout ahead" and come back and tell you that the website that you are indicating you want to go to has been previously known to "give you bad stuff", or any such warning as that. It only follows your keystrokes and as a result of a keystroke or series of keystrokes, pops up in your face to tell you that you are requesting a website or a computer change that has the potential, or the ability to be or to deliver "something ugly". UAC does not warn you when you are about to download a virus or Trojan or such, or hose your system, it only warns that the potential exists. If you didn't already have confidence that you were making a desired change to your computer, you would not have "been where you were" to have gotten the prompt in the first place. Therefore, you are going to click, "OK" and UAC has done nothing more than irritate the user. No 2: once you have clicked OK to the "in your face prompt", if a Trojan or virus is riding along inside whatever you are downloading, UAC will not know or care. Hopefully, your antivirus will catch the bad guy, but UAC is worthless for determining what is a good guy and what is a bad guy.

    Due to these two conditions, UAC is nothing but an impediment to smooth computer function.

    That's my story, and I'm stickin' to it!

    John
     
  4. reghakr

    reghakr Excellent Member

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  5. giltheissen

    giltheissen New Member

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    thanks very much for the replies, but apart from whether UAC is a good idea or not, I'm still curious as whether I can get it to leave me alone for certain trusted apps after I've installed them like Everest Ultimate 5.01, Startup Control Panel, and Revo Uninstaller. Or is my only remedy to simply shut UAC down altogether?
    Gil Theissen
    p.s. run as admin doesn't solve the problem
     
  6. whoosh

    whoosh Cooler King
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    You can start it and stop it . The choice is yours :D
     
  7. reghakr

    reghakr Excellent Member

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    After re-reading your first post.....


    Simply put, the answer is NO..If you have a good Antivirus program, spyware detection, and personal firewall, I feel there is no reason to keep UAC on.

    Just my opinion.
     
  8. whoosh

    whoosh Cooler King
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    A good opinion and the best way to approach it :)
     

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