Hyper-V Guidance

#1
If anyone would like guidance in configuring VMs, like XP or Windows 7, in Hyper-V please feel free to ask me. I'd be glad to tell you how.

Cheers,
Drew
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#2
Hi, I install windows 8 Enterprise on my laptop.
how do i setup an private network on my laptop? I have 16GB of ram on my laptop.

Thanks
 


#3
'djwnaz',

Please repost your query elsewhere in the Forum. This thread is about creating VMs in Hyper-V.

Thank you.

Cheers,
Drew
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#5
I don't seem to be able to move the Off-Topic entries from this Thread to a section on networking. Could some who can please move them to an appropriate section of the Forum. This Thread is for help regarding Hyper-V. Thanks.

Cheers,
Drew
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nmsuk

Windows Forum Admin
Staff member
Premium Supporter
#6
Drew how about just writing a guide to explain it instead of hoping someone needs help.
 


#7
Ok. Gimme a wee bit of time. I had considered that but, thought I'd see if any interest or need was expressed 1st by anyone. Not sure how much detail need to include but, I try to get something in later today; I like to try to gear things to the reader's level of understanding or curiosity.... since you've asked or suggested it, I'll take a stab @ it, though.

Cheers,
Drew
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#8
Ok, then, here I go...

1. One must have a CPU that supports Hyper-V
2. Hyper-V must be enabled in the BIOS
3. > Turn Windows Features On or Off. Find Hyper-V on the list & put a checkmark in its checkbox to turn it on. A reboot is needed to complete that.
4. Open Hyper-V Manager
5. Connect to Server. Use Local Machine.
Now all the configuration items will show.
You go to Create New. Here the amount of RAM is assigned to the VM & the size of the vhd can be set. Also, here it is told how to connect to the Net and from where or how the installation will be done.
Connectivity:
New Virtual Switch in H-V Mgr
Will use your (Host machine) Ethernet or wireless adapter, set to External
Set VMs to the same
Install Source:
H-V Mgr 'sees' the Host's optical drive(s). OS DVD inserted there installs in the new VM just like normally, as soon as the VM is Started.

Here are the parts you need to know that are not obvious:
VMs will not connect to the Net until & unless the Integration Services are installed. This is done in the Action tab of the VM. BUT, this cannot be done until & unless the OS's Service Packs are installed. So, the issue becomes how is that going to be done w/out connectivity? Here's the answer to that...

The VM must be shut off. Next Rt Clk on its vhd > Mount
You have to go download any needed SPs & Save them on the Host. Copy them to the mounted vhd. Now is, also, a good time to copy MSE to the vhd... VMs must have security on them, same as physical machines. Now Eject the mounted vhd. Go back & Start the VM. Install the SPs. NOW, run the Integration Services & now the VM will be connected. Next, install MSE. Now, do all/any Microsoft Updates.

Going forward treat VMs the same as physical machines. Keep them just as 'clean' & updated. Depending on how much RAM the Host has & if you don't assign a greater than necessary amount of RAM to the VMs, they can be kept running & thereby update automatically, same as the Host machine.

If anyone wants, needs more in-depth info, feel free to ask. Mostly, you need to know about the fact that SPs have to be in (& how to get them in) for the Integration Services to install & w/out that the VMs won't connect.

Oh, and VMs have to be Activated, same a physical machines. They may do that over the Net 'automatically' or you may need to go via the telephone to get a new Product ID.

Cheers,
Drew
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Joe S

Excellent Member
#9
Drew is this an actual VM that runs while the host is running? It sounds a bit more like the virtual hard disk in Windows 7 that was essentially a virtual partition and you installed and dual booted with that. Is there any real advantage over VMware Player which is free? Can you use a VM created by VMware? Any good links explaining it more?
Joe
 


#10
Joe,

"Drew is this an actual VM that runs while the host is running?" YES... can be 1 or more & any or all, depending on RAM, can run @ the same time as the Host Machine. Here, I am not talking about the vhd scenario for dual-booting purposes. Although, that is a terrific approach to dual-booting & certainly, when no virtualization software is in place.

Of course, I am aware of VMware & have attended seminars on it but, I have not used it myself. I had to use VirtualBox to run Windows 8 DP. Previously, I used Microsoft VPC & then Windows VPC ( or was it the other way around )... anyway, as to whether a vm created w/ VMware will run on Hyper-V, I'm sorry, I haven't heard & would have to research that one for you... but, off the top of my head, I very much doubt it. In regard to VMware being free, so is Hyper-V... as was/is MS VPC & Windows VPC. Hyper-V is specific to Windows 8, part of the OS, Pro & higher, just needs a CPU that supports it.

Oh & about the vhd method for dual-booting, that cannot be done w/ version less than Ultimate in 7 & Pro in 8.

But, by using Hyper-V, for example, I have XP, Vista & Windows 7 as VMs, all built on my Win8 HM and I can run 1, 2 or all 3 of them, simultaneously on the HM. The nice thing about leaving them run is Auto Updating & such can happen, same as a physical machine. Moreover that is an advantage over dual-boot. Multi-boot (2 or more) only allows 1 machine to be live @ a time. VMs can all run together, plus the Host; not just one OS @ a time.

Oh and VMs take space... well the VHDs do... so if you create or build more than 1, the drive where they are located needs be large enough to stay 'happy'.

Cheers,
Drew
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Sorry, I've not quite answered all your questions but, I trust I've answered some.
 


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#11
I would like to see a video tutorial on this and the differences between the two, as I believe that other members along with myself could get a better grasp of Hyper-V vs VM.
 


#12
Wouldn't a comparison between Hyper-V & VMware deserve its own thread? Seems a trifle off-topic from the OP of this one. And you found such a video it could be put there.

Cheers,
Drew
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Joe S

Excellent Member
#13
Drew
Thanks that clears up the part about the virtual hard disk. One think I found with VMware was the VMs did run better after I installed a second HD and moved them there. One thing about Hyper V is it has to be supported by the chipset even if the chipset supports virtualization they are 2 different factors. This set supported virtualization but not the Hyper V. Thanks for explaining.
Joe
 


#14
You're welcome, Joe. And, matter of fact, motivated by wanting to run Hyper-V in Windows 8 I recently completely renovated my tower starting w/ switching to a Hyper-V capable CPU. What I had prior, obviously supported virtualization but, not Hyper-V.

Yeah, VMs are a bit more than just having a couple of files sitting on a drive & drives are happiest when they have a decent amount of free space.

Cheers,
Drew
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Joe S

Excellent Member
#15
Besides the free space if they are on different drives you have twice the read/write capability instead of taxing one drive. VMware has a very good forum. On occasions thet get a tech employee involved in complex problems. They have regular posters that are certified by VMware. Occasional they get into editing program files for a fix. So they do make a real effort to solve their problems. A while ago they changed the free VMware Player so you could create the VM with it. In earlier versions you had to create the VM somewhere else like with the MS VMs. Virtualbox wasn't bad but a real pain to network manually and the MS 2004 and 2007 ones were doggy.
Joe
 


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#16
Joe,

I do recall my time w/ VirtualBox whilst running Win8 DP was very frustrating, ... maybe it was the networking part; I just remember lots of fussing about w/ it (VB).

Cheers,
Drew
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