Memory test that can be stopped, then resumed

Discussion in 'Windows 7 Hardware' started by Commander_Cool, Jul 12, 2013.

  1. Commander_Cool

    Commander_Cool Senior Member

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    I am casting about for a thorough, reliable memory test that can be left running for a while, stopped and then resumed from the address/position it was stopped at if I make my meaning clear.
    Case in point: I have been recommended Memtest86+ and I assume it does the job well but for obvious reasons you have to run it from a bootable disc. Which of course means that the PC is unavailable for the duration.
    This morning, before leaving home at 8 am, I booted into memtest figuring that by the time I'd be back at 4-5 pm it would be done, but no; it was still chugging along when I came home.
    That's 8 solid hours and yet I have only for 4 GB's of RAM. So, a memory test that would let me do the operation in chunks as described above would be the answer but is there such a thing?
    Thank you.
     
  2. Digerati

    Digerati Fantastic Member
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    You need to look at your MemTest results a little closer. Understand MemTest is designed to run until you stop it. If you look at the MemTest results, you should see that it has completed several "passes". That is, it tested all the memory locations, then started the test over and tested them again, and again, several times or passes.

    It does not test once then stop automatically.

    So you need to let it run for several passes (as it likely did after a full day of running) and you should have NO, not even one, error.

    BTW, software based RAM diagnostic tools are good, but not conclusive. If they report problems, the RAM is bad. The problem is, they don't always find the problems. Also, there are many times where RAM tests good, but the stick does not play well once installed or paired with other sticks. This means there is no software based RAM tester that is 100% reliable 100% of the time. That requires expensive memory test equipment ($1500) only found in better equipped repair facilities.

    So running with just a single RAM module to see if it fails may be necessary, repeating the process with remaining modules hopefully identifying the bad stick through a process of elimination may be your best bet.
     
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  3. Commander_Cool

    Commander_Cool Senior Member

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    Thank you Digerati for your comprehensive, informed reply. "You need to look at your MemTest results a little closer." Well, you got me there, Sergeant;) I just downloaded it and ran it, not bothering to read up on the instructions/manual. RTFM indeed!

    Also, thanks for pointing out the difference between a good test and a conclusive one. I am clear on the difference once I think about it - in fact: what good is a test, any test, if it is not conclusive so that the results are something you can act on with confidence?

    But I think hear you - if it ran for 8 hours reporting no errors the RAM is likely OK.
     
  4. Digerati

    Digerati Fantastic Member
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    That's a good question. But I still recommend these tests and note if the test find the RAM is bad, then it is bad.

    8 hours with several passes and no errors is indeed a good sign. Windows 7 (and Windows 8) has an excellent built in Memory Diagnostics Tool you can use to verify MemTest's results too.
     
  5. Commander_Cool

    Commander_Cool Senior Member

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    "8 hours with several passes and no errors is indeed a good sign." You speak the truth my faithful Indian companion. "Windows 7...has an excellent built in Memory Diagnostics Tool you can use to verify MemTest's results too."

    No fooling? I didn't know that, great! I'd say that Windows 7 has a lot of useful tools (witness: Resource Manager, for one) that for some reason users have to find out about on forums like this from knowledgeable people like yourself.

    I don't understand why these tools have to be semi-hidden, esoteric stuff that one has to find out about second- and third hand. 'Guess I don't understand everything.

    Be that as it may, having been a Windows user since version 2.0 I'd say that Windows 7 is the best version yet or whaddaya say Searg? It's fast, easy on resources and visually elegant. I think I'll stay with that and pass on 8.

    Sometimes Microsofts' insistence on dominating the user experience and forcing you into their fold can be somewhat trying and make a body seriously consider shifting to Linux.

    Remember Vista? I didn't fall for that one but most everybody I have spoken with have testified it was worse than pulling teeth (w/o the benefit of Novocaine).

    Seeyabye.
     
  6. Digerati

    Digerati Fantastic Member
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    Backup and Restore is predominantly located under Control Panel. But some tools are hidden and that is in part because 3rd party makers have tissy fits and claim MS it trying to push them out business.

    I agree with you about W7. I am trying to get used to W8, but not fairing too well.
     
  7. Commander_Cool

    Commander_Cool Senior Member

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  8. Digerati

    Digerati Fantastic Member
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    I am not pretending anything - I don't like W8 - at least I don't like the new UI - at all. And I am very upset with MS for forcing it on users. But W8 is very stable, very secure, very fast - once you get past the UI.
     
  9. Commander_Cool

    Commander_Cool Senior Member

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    You read me wrong Digerati, I was (mistakenly) trying to joke. To quote myself from a few posts back up there on this page:


    'Sometimes Microsofts' insistence on dominating the user experience and forcing you into their fold can be somewhat trying and make a body seriously consider shifting to Linux."


    You say: "But WS is verystable, very secure, very fast - once you get past the UI" That sounds fine, but I'll stick with W7 until one of two things happen:


    a) MS will own up to their mistake (Steve B: know what guys - and this will come as a complete surprise to you - but the user experience as pertains to the Ul was waay better in W7 so we're bringing that back!! For a small exorbitant fee. Restrictions apply.


    b) we will have to look to third-party software or work-around solutions and registry hacks of the howtogeek.com variety to make the Windows experience smooth and pleasant again.


    It is not for nothing that annoyances.org has been with us since the mid-90's.


    All the best!
    /Göran

    Swedenflag1.

    PS: Love your Freedom is NOT free!
     

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  10. Digerati

    Digerati Fantastic Member
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    Sorry. Frankly, I am very frustrated with W8's UI so even the suggestion I like it set me off a bit. But no way will MS ever admit they were wrong - and that plays out with 8.1 which claims to bring the Start button back, but clearly doesn't.

    Currently, I am running with ViStart/ which does a decent job of restoring W7's start menu in W8. But it is still not as good as W7's UI.
     
  11. Commander_Cool

    Commander_Cool Senior Member

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    That's perfectly allright Bill; frustration caused by the Microsoft Experience have been known to cause strokes and heart attacks even in the most stoic, amenable and otherwise docile and bovine.

    Then, the stress caused by an especially difficult Windows session is nothing that cannot be eased with a handful of Valium, so what are we bellyaching about?

    You know how sometimes when there's been a problem with Windows, let's say an app has crashed, a driver stops driving, a BSOD - whatever; the machine is dead as a doornail and you're resigned to shut it down forcibly.

    Then upon restart, and if you know for sure that it's kosher to select the Start Windows Normally option, invariably the Windows Trouble-Shooter offers its questionable services.

    Now, I wonder if there is anybody anywhere, of woman born that has actually been helped by this so-called Trouble-Shooter?

    I know I haven't and I've been using PC's since 1985, before there was a Windows (well, Xerox and then Apple of course had the technology in place in '73 and '79 respectively but...)

    On the whole I'd say that MicroDork has the feel of a government bureaucracy with all the charm of one.

    Yet still I keep coming back for more abuse for the simple reason that Windows is so predominant; there is so much good software written for it, especially of the open-source variety.

    Apart from that it's kinda like the election situation where you're forever resigned to vote for the lesser of two evils if you get my drift.
     

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