Missing files after CHKDSK no found.000 folder

Discussion in 'Windows 8 Help and Support' started by derius, Apr 30, 2015.

  1. derius

    derius New Member

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    I hope I'm in the right place.

    A while back I was copying some family files over from some (a few ancient, like 1990s) hard drives on my Ubuntu rig over to a new external 1TB NTFS HD formatted in Windows 8, nothing special. I was using the Ubuntu rig cause a few of them wouldn't initialize in Windows. I'm a regular linux'er anyway and I'm just more used to it.

    Everything copies over, a few of the oldest drives actually die in the process. It sort and name it all transfer it all to the HDD. I open the HDD, look everything over, all looks good, files are there, it's copasetic. (or how ever you spell that) I delete the files off my Ubuntu Machine thinking alls well with the world and tuck myself into bed.

    Next day I go to my parents house, HDD in hand. plug it in to their Win 8 machine, chkdsk has to run. I let it run. In the folders I put the files in, most of them end up missing.

    I take it back to my place and chkdsk wants to run every time I plug it in (win 7). I plug the HDD into my Ubuntu rig and the files are gone there too.

    I went to find the found.000 folder chkdsk is so fond of creating and there is none. The files I watched copy over with my own eyes and saw on the drive with my own eyes are no longer there.

    I ran some recovery software on the drive and the pictures appeared but we're talking about manually sorting through a flat folder of 542,200 files, give or take. I tried more than one program with more or less the same results, different sorting. Either way, a monumental task for my senior parents.

    I did notice I named a couple of folders "misc." instead of "misc" when I was naming them in Ubuntu. I forgot that kind of naming is bad under Windows and fine under Linux. I'm guessing that's what initially tripped CHKDSK. When I tried to open them under Windows 8 they were inaccessible until I removed the period (in Ubuntu). After that chkdsk didn't want to run either. The odd thing is the "misc" folders were the only folders not affected by the check. They were intact.

    So I think I screwed up. or chkdsk did. Is there a way to get these files back in their directories? Like I said, I'm more into Linux than Windows so I don't know the plumbing that well and my knowledge stops at Windows 7. Are there any Windows 7 or 8 compatible utilities that can help with this?
     
  2. ussnorway

    ussnorway Windows Forum Team
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    Sort answeer = no

    You can run a file scan over it and hope some of the files can be recovered and if you take it to a pro they will (at high cost) make a copy of your hdd then recover whatever files have not been stuffed... the more you use the drive now, the more data will be over wrighted and lost forever.

    don't use external drives for back ups... they don't like that.
    don't run a Windows scan software (like chkdsk) over a non Windows file system like old 16 and 32bit Ubuntu systems
    don't have only 1 (untested) backup before deleating files.
     
  3. derius

    derius New Member

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    Who doesn't like that?

    I'm not sure who you mean by "they"? If external drives aren't used for backing up once in a while, what good are they for?

    I'm using Ubuntu 14.04 on a 2 year old PC It's far from old. The drive was formatted NTFS in Windows 8 like I mentioned before, not Ubuntu.

    untested backup? point taken. thing is, the files were there. Even my Windows 7 box said so at the time.

    I didn't think about SFS. Thank you!
     
  4. ussnorway

    ussnorway Windows Forum Team
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    The basic point of the standard external drive is transportation… you take some files to a mates house or bring your work home with you but these drives tend to use a usb interface at the plug end and this port type is notorious for dropping connections. Internal sata drives are best for basic back ups with nas boxes allowing for times when an external (reliable and full-time) device is wanted.

    Yes you said your computer was Windows 8 but you also say the files being backed up are 1990’s vintage... in any event, good luck.
     

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