Old and New -- MVS 370 Mainframe on Windows 7

#1
Hi all
I just love this one.:razz: It's just about as far removed from "Cloud Computing" as you can get. A real mix here of Old and New.

Using the Hercules emulator you can run your very own IBM MVS 370 Mainframe system on W7 with no probs at all -- the power of even a humble laptop is vastly bigger than contained in those old IBM mainframes.
Here's an image with an Operator's console (yes you had a separate operator in those days to control the system) and a TSO terminal (where users could logon to run stuff).

Actually the MVS OS was (and still is) a classic in well designed OS'es -- this one is in the public domain with most of the source code still available so it's a GREAT learning tool for anybody who wants to learn how the Internals of an OS are built.
This OS is still used as a design model for modern OS'es and the only way it was EVER hacked in it's entire history was by Physical access into the "Machine" room where a trusted person could actually input some "Hex Code" at protected addresses.

Cheers
jimbo
 


whoosh

Cooler King
Staff member
Premium Supporter
#2
Hi all
I just love this one.:razz: It's just about as far removed from "Cloud Computing" as you can get. A real mix here of Old and New.

Using the Hercules emulator you can run your very own IBM MVS 370 Mainframe system on W7 with no probs at all -- the power of even a humble laptop is vastly bigger than contained in those old IBM mainframes.
Here's an image with an Operator's console (yes you had a separate operator in those days to control the system) and a TSO terminal (where users could logon to run stuff).

Actually the MVS OS was (and still is) a classic in well designed OS'es -- this one is in the public domain with most of the source code still available so it's a GREAT learning tool for anybody who wants to learn how the Internals of an OS are built.
This OS is still used as a design model for modern OS'es and the only way it was EVER hacked in it's entire history was by Physical access into the "Machine" room where a trusted person could actually input some "Hex Code" at protected addresses.

Cheers
jimbo
Wow ! Thats a good one for sure :) Thanks :)
 


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