Question about upgrading

Discussion in 'Windows 7 Help and Support' started by blackzr, Aug 31, 2009.

  1. blackzr

    blackzr New Member

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    Question about upgrading!

    Hi I have Vista Home premium.
    As everyone know; there are 3 window 7 editions which are:

    - Home premium
    - Professional
    - Ultimate

    So here is my question.. I have Vista home premium so does my computer can be only upgrade to Window 7 home premium?

    Or my computer just simply able to upgrade to all available editions despite of what edition i have currently?
     
  2. bobkn

    bobkn New Member

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    An upgrade *license* can be used two ways:

    An "upgrade-in-place" preserves applications, settings, and files (on the OS partition). Vista Home Premium can be upgraded in place to Win7 Home Premium or Ultimate. (I'm not sure why Professional isn't an option.)

    A "custom" install is basically a clean install. Applications and settings are not preserved. The previous installation is moved to a windows.old directory. I believe that any upgrade version of Win7 can be used this way with any qualifying previous OS.

    Here's a version of the upgrade matrix:

    http://i.zdnet.com/blogs/windows_7_upgrade_chart.png
     
  3. blackzr

    blackzr New Member

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    that's... rather an answer i wasn't looking for... or i'm lacking with understanding.

    Let me ask again... I want to know for example... i have vista home. So can i upgrade to window 7 professional/ultimate from Vista home or I can ONLY upgrade Vista Home to Window 7 Home.
     
  4. bobkn

    bobkn New Member

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    Too many words?

    You can upgrade Vista Home Premium to Windows 7 Home Premium or Ultimate. (Not Professional.)

    You can use any upgrade *version* of Win7 that you like, if you have a qualifying previous OS (Win2k, XP, Vista). Most of them would require a "custom" install, though.

    (The "custom" install option would be a problem for me if I had pre-installed software on an appliance PC that I needed to keep. Fortunately, I do not. My desktop PC is a homebuilt, and my laptop came only with MS Works, which I've replaced with Office 2003.)
     
  5. blackzr

    blackzr New Member

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    thanks i understand now.
    Just one more... in place upgrade keeps all files, settings, and programs.
    So if i do custom install then what will happen to all files i got on computer?
     
  6. textureDnB

    textureDnB New Member

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    That depends, if you choose custom install but do NOT choose to FORMAT the partition your files will be put in a folder called windows.old. Don't trust this backup regardless!!!
    If you choose to format the partition the files will be destroyed.

    This all only applies to files/programs on the partition you install W7 to (eg. C:/) other partitions should be safe but it is better to assume the worst and back up anyway.
     
  7. blackzr

    blackzr New Member

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    hm so it's just "better than not doing it"? Thanks for help.
     
  8. bobkn

    bobkn New Member

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    I expect that someone will correct me if I'm mistaken, but I believe that you aren't permitted to format the partition if you enter an upgrade license key.

    If memory serves, and it's like Vista, you could format if you didn't enter a license key, but that would leave you with no qualifying OS on the partition. I have read that the Win7 installer willl require an *activated* qualifying OS, so the 30 day evaluation version wouldn't permit an upgrade (unlike Vista).
     
  9. textureDnB

    textureDnB New Member

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    Not sure I understand the new question.

    A format and clean install is preferred by most users of this forum since it starts with a clean drive and there are no applications to complicate things.
    If you have alot of applications and you want to avoid reinstalling your programs attempting an upgrade is an option but if you experience poor behavior from windows after the upgrade you should re install with a format.

    In the clean install department (custom) you have two optons: 1 to format and install 2 to install without re formatting.
    The most secure option for a well installed OS is to format and install. Installation without format is available for those folks who are not in an "acceptable upgrade path" it will leave your old files in a folder called: "windows.old" none of your applications will work however.

    In all of these options microsoft and almost everyone with a pulse will tell you that you must backup any data your not willing to lose. This is for safety, the upgrade and clean install W/O format options are supposed to preserve all data, however, does your computer ALWAYS do EXACTLY what it's supposed to?
     
  10. textureDnB

    textureDnB New Member

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    It gets a little confusing here but you can clean install with a format and upgrade media. You will need a qualifying OS installed (not necessarily activated) or I believe simply having the disc for a qualifying OS available to insert when prompted. There are many threads about this but the definitive answer eludes me I think it's a pinned thread in the windows seven installation forum. And i don't think were far enough along towards GA to be sure what is rumor and fact.
     
  11. john3347

    john3347 Extraordinary Member
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    Blackzr, Listen closely to texture.



    For the long term "most satisfying experience" list all your applications, save all your files and do a "clean install".

    There are some terminology conflicts that make problems with communication sometimes. Microsoft calls an "upgrade" the replacement of an older OS with a newer OS - regardless of the upgrade method. Common usage calls an "upgrade" what Microsoft refers to as "in place" upgrade (or downgrade if, for instance, using the option to "downgrade" Vista Business to XP Pro). Hence, you have an "upgrade" version of an operating system that is capable of performing an in place upgrade over a qualifying "old" OS, or a clean install upgrade over a qualifying old OS, but it is still recommended that you do yourself a favor and save your files externally and do a "format and install" upgrade. A "full version" disc is intended for installation on new computers or on really old computers that have obsolete OSs that are in some way incompatible with files required to update to the desired new OS.

    bobkn provided the actual answer to your original question.
     
  12. blackzr

    blackzr New Member

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    unfortunetly, i cannot do the saving all files... if you meant save files on dvd or something.
    But since W7 is coming at Oct... i think i'll just wait and decide what to do later. Thanks for help again.
     
  13. NormanF

    NormanF New Member

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    I have the same edition on my HP desktop and Toshiba laptop. Basically, one can do an in-place upgrade only to Windows 7 Home Premium. After that, one may use Windows 7 Anywhere Upgrade to upgrade all the way to Ultimate.
     

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