Upgrade possibility?

Discussion in 'Windows 7 Hardware' started by barsim, May 23, 2013.

  1. barsim

    barsim Active Member

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    Hi,

    The CPU in my PC (upgraded to Win 7 Home Premium x 64 from XP Pro) Dell OptiPlex 520 is (Pentium D 2.8GHz) old and slow. The MoBo model: Dell 0RJ290. BIOS is v.11.
    What CPU with max. performance is acceptable for this MoBo, if at all?
    My goal is to speed up my PC on the cheap.
    Would Microsoft require a new product key or refuse giving out one, or the present key will suffice?
    Thank you
    barsim
     
  2. Digerati

    Digerati Fantastic Member
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    Then, by far the best bang for your money is normally to increase RAM, not the CPU. And after RAM, it is typically best to look at your current graphics solution. Only after you have an ample supply of RAM and a good graphics solution (especially if originally using on-board graphics) does upgrading the CPU make economical sense.

    As far as Microsoft is concerned, you can replace any hardware on your system without needing a new Windows license, except the motherboard. Since the motherboard is the heart and soul and main component of any computer, upgrading the motherboard is considered a new computer and therefore requires its own license. The exception there is only if the original license is a full retail license, but Dell does not provide those with their computers.


    Hmmm: CPU upgrade possibility? - Windows 7 Help Forums.
     
  3. kemical

    kemical Windows Forum Admin
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    Hmm ... That's an old moBo and you'd probably be best saving for a new upgrade.
     
  4. Pauli

    Pauli Extraordinary Member
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    I'd go with kemical. Upgrading a computer is best done by a leap. There's no real idea in getting 15% more, because that will be done with in no time - especially if you game --- text making can, actually, still be technically done with machines 20 years old.

    My personal upgrading has been 2, meaning I double the stuff. That way I get a step forward, and don't have to think about it for a while.
     
  5. Digerati

    Digerati Fantastic Member
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    Not sure I would agree with that as a general statement. Unless the motherboard was fully populated with RAM, an advance graphics solution, big CPU and enough storage on the day it was built, the computer and user can often benefit from a slowly evolving series of smaller upgrades over several years to stretch the life of the computer.

    It all depends on the starting point - and who built the computer. If you bought an entry level eMachines, for example, they have little to no upgrade potentials. If you built your own did not max out the board and parts you may have lots of expansion/upgrade possibilities.

    But regardless, I would look at upgrading RAM before upgrading the CPU - if that is possible and a new computer is not in the budget.
     

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