Win Vista 32 to Win 7/64 bit OS install

Discussion in 'Windows 7 Installation' started by Vista32 to Win7, May 16, 2013.

  1. Vista32 to Win7

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    Greetings:

    I have a faulting disk that needs replacement. I am considering replacing the disk with a SSD/HDD Seagate 750GB, 7500 RPM disk. I also want to install Win7/64 bit to replace the original Vista 32 bit OS. And upgrade the memory from 3 to 4 GB.

    I am not computer savvy, but learning stuff. I see there are SSD disk install kits available to transfer the data from the old disk to the new disk. Not sure if these transfer kits can be used to install the new OS onto the new drive?

    I have never done a OS install before, so big learning curve for me. But my Windows Upgrade Adviser Report tells me I need to do a "Custom Install" to get a Win 7/64 bit OS onto my Vista 32 bit computer.

    Someone suggested a "Clean Install", I'm not sure what the difference is between a clean and custom install? I see there is a "How to do a Custom Install of Win 7", as well as a "How to do a Clean Install of Win 7", on this site. So I presume the custom install is the way I should go. So that's my initial question here, custom install?

    If I can find a install kit that will transfer all my data over to the new OS and disk, that would be a plus. Kingston has a SSD install kit that makes the transfer process go more smoothly. But prefer a SSD/HDD disk for my computing needs. Or maybe use "Windows Easy Transfer".

    I was going to put a "Hemi" in there, but don't think it will fit? :rolleyes:

    Any assistance, help, or replies appreciated. Thanks, Vista 32
     
    #1 Vista32 to Win7, May 16, 2013
    Last edited: May 17, 2013
  2. Vista32 to Win7

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    Thanks for all the help, much appreciated.

    Vista32 to WIn7
     
  3. bassfisher6522

    bassfisher6522 Essential Member

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    Hey, sorry that no one has gotten this any sooner.

    There is only 2 kinds of installs with and OS...upgrade, where the new OS is over written on top of the old and all your data is saved, and a clean install, which wipes your drive completely, so there's no data on it what so ever and then the new OS is installed.

    To answer your question....the only way to go from 32 bit to 64 bit is a clean install...which is formatt of the drive and then install the OS.

    32-bit and 64-bit Windows: frequently asked questions
     
    #3 bassfisher6522, May 26, 2013
    Last edited: May 26, 2013
  4. patcooke

    patcooke Microsoft MVP
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    A clean install is always to be preferred to an upgrade (which in your case is not in any case possible) but I'd take this opportunity of a fresh start to go further than this. You mention transferring data to the new install. This is only necessary because of the habit established years ago of storing user data embedded and scattered about the system drive in a host of folders called "My music, my pictures, my documents" . . . ad inf. This structure is in complete contrast to long established industry standards which have maintained complete separation between software (op sys, installed apps and associated config and system files) and user data. I strongly recommend you create a second partition on your hard drive or install a second drive to which you should save all data. It will help if you set your system defaults and any installed programs to save to the data drive. This way whenever you wish to upgrade your system, if you need to reinstall you have no concerns about overwriting data - it is safely stored elsewhere. It also keeps your system drive down to a manageable size (mine is 40gb with 10gb to spare). This makes it more manageable to keep it backed up using imaging software such as Acronis (another issue in its own right but highly recommended). It also avoids constant fragmentation and consequent slowing down of your system drive as it will be much less frequently subjected to insertions, additions and deletions of user data. Finally it is much easier to take control of your own data backup strategies - another good practice (check with some of the many people who have sought help here to recover valuable data files lost or accidentally deleted!) It all requires a bit of thinking out and planning but is not difficult and the next time you need to run an install you'll be oh so glad you did it.
     
  5. Vista32 to Win7

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    bassfisher6522;

    There is only 2 kinds of installs with and OS...upgrade, where the new OS is over written on top of the old and all your data is saved, and a clean install, which wipes your drive completely, so there's no data on it what so ever and then the new OS is installed.

    To answer your question....the only way to go from 32 bit to 64 bit is a clean install...which is formatt of the drive and then install the OS.

    32-bit and 64-bit Windows: frequently asked questions

    R. Hey, thanks for your answer. In viewing the above link you provided, Microsoft [MS] pretty much explains in its definition section the difference between custom/clean installations as:

    A custom Installation or a "clean installation" of Windows Vista A custom installation of Windows Vista does not preserve the currently installed personal files, settings and programs. A custom installation is also known as a "clean installation." Windows Vista is installed without third-party programs. You can perform a custom installation of Windows Vista by using either an upgrade license or a full product license. However, if you own an upgrade license, you must select Custom at the installation choice menu to perform this action. Note your particular upgrade path for complete details on how to perform this installation type

    So it appears both words clean/custom install are a matter of ones choice of words and mean basically the same thing. I suppose one could also use the term "Fresh install" to mean the same. To a novice like me not knowing the differences, if any, leads to further confusion on which install procedure to use?

    Are there tutorials on "how to do a custom or clean install of Win 7" on this website? Or maybe I saw the tutorials on another similar named site?

    Thanks, Vista32 to Win7
     
  6. patcooke

    patcooke Microsoft MVP
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    No, they have different meanings - see my reply above.
     
  7. Vista32 to Win7

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    Thank you for your input!

    patcooke; A clean install is always to be preferred to an upgrade (which in your case is not in any case possible)

    R. So would this mean I could buy the Win 7/64 bit OS upgrade version, and do a clean/custom/fresh install of the upgrade version? As opposed to buying the full or OEM Win 7/64 bit OS version?

    ==================

    You mention transferring data to the new install. I strongly recommend you create a second partition on your hard drive or install a second drive to which you should save all data.

    R. This is new ground for me, creating a 2nd partition on my HDD, install a 2nd HDD?

    One of my questions is whether I should purchase one of those $10-$25, empty external HDD enclosures to transfer my old data to the new HDD before installing same?

    OR purchase a more expensive $60-70 Western Digital [WD] or Seagate 1 TB type external HDD to store/save/transfer my data on? Plus the $100-750GB Seagate SSHDD drive I contemplate buying, installing, and using, to replace my current failing 250GB WD HDD?

    ==================

    It will help if you set your system defaults and any installed programs to save to the data drive.

    R. This is also unknown territory for me. So if there's a "How to link" on this somewhere it would help understand these settings.

    ==================

    This way whenever you wish to upgrade your system, if you need to reinstall you have no concerns about overwriting data - it is safely stored elsewhere. It also keeps your system drive down to a manageable size (mine is 40gb with 10gb to spare). This makes it more manageable to keep it backed up using imaging software such as Acronis (another issue in its own right but highly recommended).

    R. I recently downloaded Acronis "MigrateEasy7.0_d_en" free download, but haven't used it yet. As I am still unsure whether I should follow the MS Windows "Custom Install" directions...for going from Vista 32 bit OS to Win 7/64 bit OS. Which includes using the Windows "Easy Transfer" directions to save the old OS data to transfer to the new HDD.

    Or use any of the other versions of custom/clean install directions?

    =======================

    It also avoids constant fragmentation and consequent slowing down of your system drive as it will be much less frequently subjected to insertions, additions and deletions of user data.

    R. I understand fragmentation as being a "Scatter Brain Approach" :confused: for the time it takes for the computer to decipher where on the computer the information you seek is located and putting it on your screen. And if not where it should be, then it just takes longer for the computer to find it. Does this sound about right? Or what you are referring to?

    ========================

    Finally it is much easier to take control of your own data backup strategies - another good practice (check with some of the many people who have sought help here to recover valuable data files lost or accidentally deleted!) It all requires a bit of thinking out and planning but is not difficult and the next time you need to run an install you'll be oh so glad you did it.

    R. I fully concur here, as that is my #1 goal for now--saving/backing up my current data for transfer and "just in case."

    I have some documents copied on a CD-RW, but some of the other files where to big to burn the files to the CD's I have.

    There are many options to backup data, USB Flash Drives, external HDD's, Windows Easy Transfer, the Windows auto-backup procedure, Acronis, etc. So not sure or confusing which is best way to backup in my situation?

    But my current HDD is giving me blue screens, shut downs, chkdsk restarts, freezing up screens, forced power button shutdowns, etc., at unannounced times. So that makes backing up my #1 goal right now.

    So any help or input are greatly appreciated, thanks, Vista32 to Win7.
     
    #7 Vista32 to Win7, May 27, 2013
    Last edited: May 27, 2013
  8. Vista32 to Win7

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    patcooke; No, they have different meanings - see my reply above.

    R. Or your other reply in different thread.

    [​IMG] patcooke
    [​IMG] Tier 2 Moderator Microsft Most Valuable
    Professional

    [​IMG] [​IMG]



    Clean or Custom install?


    To answer your opening question - a "clean" install and a "custom" install are not mutually exclusive - they define different aspects of the [COLOR=blue !important][FONT=inherit !important][COLOR=blue !important][FONT=inherit !important]installation [/FONT][/FONT][FONT=inherit !important][COLOR=blue !important][FONT=inherit !important]process[/FONT][/COLOR][/FONT][/COLOR][/COLOR]. A clean install (as opposed to an upgrade install) involves reformatting the drive and installing a fresh version of the system without importing any of the files from an earlier system. This is the preferred method and is recommended as it excludes importing any junk and possible problems from the earlier installation.

    A custom install may apply to either clean or upgrade install and enables the user to select various options (such as where to install the system). The opposite of a custom install is just to accept the defaults.

    You may purchase either a "full" install version which is designed to be installed on an empty drive with no previous version of Windows installed. The upgrade version is less expensive and is intended to be installed on a drive which already has a version of Windows installed. For many years users have been aware of a simple technique for using the cheaper upgrade disk to run a full clean install. There are simple guides for doing this all over the net - just google something like windows full install using upgrade. This process will save you money and is recommended.

    R. Okay will look for a "How to do a full clean install using an upgrade version of Win 7 Link".

    Thanks.
     
  9. Vista32 to Win7

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    I strongly recommend you create a second partition on your hard drive or install a second drive to which you should save all data.

    R. I do have a (C:) drive that has what appears to be most of my system components. And a (D:) drive holding my data. I presume this is what you are referring to above, if so, will these two drives carry over to the new HDD when installed? Or is this something I will have to do manually?

    Thanks
     
  10. patcooke

    patcooke Microsoft MVP
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    Yes you can do a clean install using the upgrade version, just google something like the words clean install upgrade version and you will find many guides to this simple process.

    For data storage you need to use an internal drive to give you immediate access to it. This may be done either by shringking your drive c and creating a new partition on your existing drive or by installing a a second drive. Then transfer all your data from the various folders of your drive C onto the new drive before running the clean install. Once you have your system set up then you should obtain an external drive to backup all your data onto just by copying all files and folders across.

    Creating partitions, setting up drives, copying data and so on are skills which if you feel unsure about you might consider signing up to a local class. You can acquire these skills remotely but you can't beat hands on training for learning effectively and quickly.
     
  11. mrbalick

    mrbalick New Member

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    hi, thanks very much . me have been working ..
     
  12. Vista32 to Win7

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    Thanks for your reply.

    Pat Cooke: For data storage you need to use an internal drive to give you immediate access to it. This may be done either by shringking your drive c and creating a new partition on your existing drive or by installing a a second drive.


    Then transfer all your data from the various folders of your drive C onto the new drive before running the clean install. Once you have your system set up then you should obtain an external drive to backup all your data onto just by copying all files and folders across.

    R. I plan on buying a external backup drive like the WD passport or something similar. When you say "or by installing a 2nd drive", I take this as meaning I could use an external drive, such as WD passport. Where I could transfer my old data, programs, pics, etc. onto that external drive. Install a new HDD, install the new Win 7 OS, and then transfer my old data on the external drive, to the new internal HDD. This sound about right?

    PC: Creating partitions, setting up drives, copying data and so on are skills which if you feel unsure about you might consider signing up to a local class. You can acquire these skills remotely but you can't beat hands on training for learning effectively and quickly.

    R. I Agree, this would be helpful. But don't have a vehicle to get to wherever there might be a local hands on training class. But I'll check it out.

    I downloaded a program yesterday called "MiniTool Partition", which has as one of its features a "Copy Disk Wizard". It's all new to me, so will take some time just to learn how to use the program to copy the system or whatever.

    Thanks again for your time, Vista32
     
  13. Vista32 to Win7

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    Hello again:

    In reference to patcooke's reply: "I strongly recommend you create a second partition on your hard drive or install a second drive to which you should save all data. It will help if you set your system defaults and any installed programs to save to the data drive. This way whenever you wish to upgrade your system, if you need to reinstall you have no concerns about overwriting data - it is safely stored elsewhere. It also keeps your system drive down to a manageable size (mine is 40gb with 10gb to spare)."
    ________________________

    Vista32: My current Vista (C:) drive partition is 124.85 GB, with 74 GB used. The suggested 50 GB Win 7 OS partition sounds good to me for the above reasons. My current (C:) Vista drive also has on it, Program Files: 3.23 GB. Users: 25.46 GB. Windows Properties: 24 GB, etc.

    My question I guess, is when I transfer my files/data to my new HDD. Should I include the other (C:) drive programs/users/Windows properties, listed above, into the (C:) drive/partition on my new HDD? Or should these programs be kept separate from the OS drive/partition on a (D:) partition?

    My current Vista (D:) drive has 34 GB left. My current HDD is 250 GB.

    I transferred to a 1 TB external drive approximately 95 GB of my current Vista data, files, pics, etc., using Windows Easy Transfer.

    I also presume the Win 7 Pro OS itself is approximately 3 GB's or so? And presume I only need a (C:) partition with about that much space for a Win 7 OS. With some additional GB's to spare, or 50 GB to dedicate a partition soley for the OS. In case I need to reinstall/update in the future, as suggested.

    I am still learning "how to" partition a "new/clean HDD" before I jump into the fire so to speak. It appears a (C:) drive dedicated soley for the OS install is the way to go. Everything else goes into a separate (D:) partition, ie; data, pics, games, programs, processor work, documents, etc.

    Any partitioning suggestions, appreciated.
    _______________________________

    From what I have read and understand, it is not necessary to create the Windows 7 partitions on a new (empty) hard drive or format the partitions before installing Windows 7 as the installer will do that automatically.

    I presume here that the installer will create a 100 MB System Reserved partition, and a partition for Windows 7. Which I presume the installer labels as a (C:) drive/partition?

    Which leaves me wondering if the installer or I have to create a (D:) partition for the data, files, pics, programs, etc.?

    Any answers/replies appreciated, thanks, Vista to Win7.
     

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