Blue Screen Issues - MEMORY_MANAGEMENT

Discussion in 'Windows 7 Blue Screen of Death (BSOD)' started by lonewolf371, Aug 16, 2010.

  1. lonewolf371

    lonewolf371 New Member

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    Hello all,

    Problem: I've been having a number of Blue Screens lately with the MEMORY_MANAGEMENT error. The only consistent thing that I can say about them is that they never occur while the system is idle. Also, different boots appear to be "stable" or "unstable". An unstable boot will have a number of programs crash before a Blue Screen, while a stable boot will have no crashes and I can run internet browsers and games and such for hours. Usually the crashes occur quickly after opening an internet browser.

    Attempted Fixes:

    1) I've run memtest86+ for several eight hour sessions (also testing each stick individually) with no errors.

    2) I've run the disk check utility and the hard drive passes SMART status.

    3) I've checked the temperatures and voltages of the system and they're all within specifications (i.e. voltages +/- 5%, etc.)

    4) The graphics card shouldn't be the issue in my opinion. I've run FurMark for a couple hours and all temperatures stayed quite low and no crashes resulted.

    5) The only stress test that's showed an error so far is Prime95. Based on this I RMAd the processor, but received a Blue Screen on the very first boot up with the new processor.

    At this point I'm beginning to suspect problems with the motherboard, but I wanted to confirm this with another opinion before I bought a new one.

    Crash Dump files:

    080310-16140-01.dmp

    080810-15218-01.dmp

    080810-15328-01.dmp

    081610-17078-01.dmp
     
  2. cybercore

    cybercore New Member

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    It is different processes + system kernel ntkrnlmp.exe. It is caused by hardware, most likely CPU/memory/motherboard.

    080310-16140-01

    Repair.exe - is this a WOW process?

    ntkrnlmp.exe - this is related to the system, lit. "NT KeRNeL, Multi-Processor version".



    080810-15218-01

    chrome.exe
    ntkrnlmp.exe




    080810-15328-01

    SearchIndexer - system
    memory_corruption problem here




    081610-17078-01

    MsMpEng.exe - Microsoft Windows Defender Service
    ntkrnlmp.exe - again, system kernel.
     
  3. lonewolf371

    lonewolf371 New Member

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    Repair.exe is a Starcraft II process I ran to repair the installation. The CPU was just changed through the RMA process so I doubt that it would have caused the most recent Blue Screen. Between the RAM and mobo, I suspect the mobo more due to the memtest86+ runs. Is that reasonable?
     
  4. TorrentG

    TorrentG Banned

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    There are NTFS references in the stack text of the crash dumps. This generally means one of two things:

    1) Bad RAM
    2) Errors on the hard drive. (Very likely here. Seems like it's having trouble reading.)

    I will address these things in a moment.

    ---------

    Code:
    Rt64win7 Rt64win7.sys Thu Jul 30 07:58:43 2009
    Update this driver from Realtek for the network. To do so, open device manager then expand the network section. See which exact Realtek adapter you have. Then search for it on the left side of this link:

    Realtek

    ----------

    You can update the video card driver:

    Code:
    atikmdag atikmdag.sys Tue May 04 21:41:02 2010
    Drivers & Support | GAME.AMD.COM

    -----------


    To attempt repair of all hard drive errors, open an elevated command prompt.
    Type chkdsk /r then hit enter. Follow the simple instructions on screen.

    If you have the page file on another hard drive or partition than C:, run the command for that partition too. For example:

    chkdsk /r D:


    -----------

    Since you seem to have tested memory to a sufficient degree, I will leave this alone for now. Please let us know how things are going after these steps above. If you have more crashes, please post them as they may prove equally or greater in helpfulness.
     
  5. TorrentG

    TorrentG Banned

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    One further thing that almost all enthusiasts do anyhow:

    I highly recommend to type services.msc in the start menu then hit enter. Use this screen to stop and set to disabled, the Windows Search service.
     
  6. lonewolf371

    lonewolf371 New Member

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    Already checked the video driver and check disk. The video driver is 10.5 because I had some other (but I think unrelated) issues with 10.7. Updating the onboard LAN driver did not work. I don't think the hard drive would cause a Prime95 error.

    I see most of the signs point to the RAM, but memtest86+ returned no errors. Also, "unstable boots" basically don't go away when I just use a the restart function; a complete shutdown is required. Finally, they seem to be cold start related. I think I'm going to purchase a new motherboard, and if that doesn't work RMA the RAM.

    New dump:
    081710-17171-01.dmp
     
  7. TorrentG

    TorrentG Banned

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    I really think the issue somehow lies with the hard drive. Here is the stack text of the latest crash dump:

    Code:
    STACK_TEXT:  
    fffff880`02f4c9b8 fffff800`02b5838c : 00000000`0000004e 00000000`00000099 00000000`0005feb1 00000000`00000000 : nt!KeBugCheckEx
    fffff880`02f4c9c0 fffff800`02a6c407 : 00000000`0000197f fffffa80`016e0180 00000000`00000000 fffff880`012d50cf : nt!MiBadShareCount+0x4c
    fffff880`02f4ca00 fffff800`02ddf1b5 : fffff980`09f80000 fffff8a0`077e6720 00000000`00000001 00000000`00000001 : nt! ?? ::FNODOBFM::`string'+0x2c15b
    fffff880`02f4cce0 fffff800`02ae1567 : 00000000`02400000 fffffa80`03b35f50 00000000`00000000 00000000`02500000 : nt!CcUnmapVacb+0x5d
    fffff880`02f4cd20 fffff800`02ae73b5 : 00000000`00000001 00000000`01d00000 fffffa80`040b0b60 00000000`00000001 : nt!CcUnmapVacbArray+0x1b7
    fffff880`02f4cdb0 fffff800`02dce942 : 00000000`01d00000 00000000`02500000 fffff880`02f4cf08 fffff880`02f4cf00 : nt!CcGetVirtualAddress+0x2c5
    fffff880`02f4ce40 fffff880`012a97cb : 00000000`00000000 fffffa80`03b5cb60 fffff880`02f4d2f8 00000000`0000000f : nt!CcMapData+0xd2
    fffff880`02f4cf00 fffff880`0121ea34 : 00000000`00100000 fffff880`02f4d0d0 00000000`02500000 fffff880`01222b69 : Ntfs!NtfsMapStream+0x5b
    fffff880`02f4cf40 fffff880`0122273c : fffff880`02f4d390 fffff8a0`0331c660 00000000`206c644d 00000000`00000000 : Ntfs!NtfsLockFileRange+0xa4
    fffff880`02f4cfd0 fffff880`01228a12 : fffff880`02f4d390 fffffa80`04dfb910 fffffa80`041be180 fffff8a0`0331c660 : Ntfs!NtfsNonCachedIo+0x91a
    fffff880`02f4d1a0 fffff880`0122d413 : fffff880`02f4d390 fffffa80`04dfb910 fffff880`02f4d500 fffff880`02f4d501 : Ntfs!NtfsCommonWrite+0x872
    fffff880`02f4d360 fffff880`010b023f : fffffa80`04dfbc68 fffffa80`04dfb910 fffffa80`04f747b0 00000000`00000000 : Ntfs!NtfsFsdWrite+0x1c3
    fffff880`02f4d5e0 fffff880`010ae6df : fffffa80`041a5860 fffffa80`03f33a10 fffffa80`041a5800 fffffa80`04dfb910 : fltmgr!FltpLegacyProcessingAfterPreCallbacksCompleted+0x24f
    fffff880`02f4d670 fffff800`02ab72ff : fffffa80`04dfb910 fffff880`02f4dc58 fffffa80`040477d0 fffff880`02d63180 : fltmgr!FltpDispatch+0xcf
    fffff880`02f4d6d0 fffff800`02ab6987 : 00000000`00000000 fffff880`02f4dc58 fffffa80`01686b70 00000000`00000000 : nt!IoSynchronousPageWrite+0x24f
    fffff880`02f4d750 fffff800`02ab4804 : fffff8a0`08247800 fffff8a0`08248000 fffffa80`04e06c50 fffffa80`04e06c50 : nt!MiFlushSectionInternal+0xa58
    fffff880`02f4d990 00000000`00000000 : 00000000`00000000 00000000`00000000 00000000`00000000 00000000`00000000 : nt!MmFlushSection+0xa4
    
    To read that, you go from bottom to top. Anyhow, notice the NTFS references. That means the file system that Windows 7 uses, along with the hard drive itself.

    I would recommend replacing the hard drive, even with a cheap old one for now simply for testing purposes. If no errors occur, then you know what exactly was the cause.

    Before even doing that, visit your motherboard manufacturer's site. Download and install the latest chipset/storage drivers to make sure they are the latest available. Install the latest bios too.
     
  8. lonewolf371

    lonewolf371 New Member

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    All right I'll try to look into the hard drive soon. I've visited the manufacturer's website and downloaded the latest chipset/storage drivers and the latest BIOS. The same problems occurred with the earlier chipsets/storage drivers and BIOS. I haven't really tried the hard drive yet because I haven't found a stress test or error check that implicates it. NTFS.sys caused the latest crash, but there have been other crashes caused by win32k.sys, atikmdag.sys (graphics), atikmpag.sys (graphics), mfehidk.sys (McAfee), and fltmgr.sys. Seems like it's just whatever's running at the time that builds enough errors for the bug check.

    Maybe I can put in an old hard drive and slap on a copy of Windows 7 without activation.

    I know you said you were interested in more dumps. Some of these older ones were before I switched which SATA port the hard drive was connected to, which seemed to decrease the frequency of the crashes for a little bit. It may have been psychological, though.

    070610-17238-01.dmp

    070610-17269-01.dmp

    070610-27346-01.dmp

    070810-14968-01.dmp

    070910-14890-01.dmp

    071110-14609-01.dmp

    071110-20359-01.dmp

    071210-16296-01.dmp

    071410-17593-01.dmp

    071810-18984-01.dmp

    072810-18625-01.dmp

    That's as far back as I can go. Older ones were with older OS installs.
     
    #8 lonewolf371, Aug 17, 2010
    Last edited: Aug 17, 2010

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