Homegroup/workgroup solved....for me at least

I have networked with full shares with all 5 pcs. This whole homegroup/workgroup mess is solved for me.What I was attempting to do is network all 5 pcs with administrative shares, but like many others, I was having issues with the 7 seeing and accessing the XP boxes. I have 2 xp, 2 vista, and 1 win 7 64 bit.
I've attached a screenie to show 2 things....
1. Homegroup only works on Win 7 boxes. It clearly states that in the Homegroup information. Once I disconnected from Homegroup I was allowed to go into network, and select workgroup. Once workgroup was selected, it's just setting up your own desired shares. I was assuming Microsoft was just doing their obligatory renaming and that Homegroup and workgroup were the same...they are not. And since Homegroup is valid only on 7 boxes and not taking MS legacy OSs into consideration, I dont know why they'd even add it.
2 On the left under NETWORK is where I connected to workgroup.

I hope helped at least 1!:D
 


madsere

New Member
Cool. But how do you disconnect from the homegroup?
 


I have networked with full shares with all 5 pcs. This whole homegroup/workgroup mess is solved for me.What I was attempting to do is network all 5 pcs with administrative shares, but like many others, I was having issues with the 7 seeing and accessing the XP boxes. I have 2 xp, 2 vista, and 1 win 7 64 bit.
I've attached a screenie to show 2 things....
1. Homegroup only works on Win 7 boxes. It clearly states that in the Homegroup information. Once I disconnected from Homegroup I was allowed to go into network, and select workgroup. Once workgroup was selected, it's just setting up your own desired shares. I was assuming Microsoft was just doing their obligatory renaming and that Homegroup and workgroup were the same...they are not. And since Homegroup is valid only on 7 boxes and not taking MS legacy OSs into consideration, I dont know why they'd even add it.
2 On the left under NETWORK is where I connected to workgroup.

I hope helped at least 1!:D
I think you correctly describe the difference between workgroup/SMB shares and this "Homegroup" thing correctly. The first being supported by every MS OS released during the past 15 years as well as many non-Microsoft OS'es. Unix/Linux being the major ones but also more obscure ones such as OpenVMS. "Homegroup" on the other hand is only supported by Windows 7 as yet and I think that will remain that way for the forseeable future. Probably long enough for Microsoft to forget about it because no big corporations are going to be using it anyway if it has such flimsy support.
 


jagman

New Member
Did it last? My problem is simpler as all I want to do is share my USB HDs, 8 of them on my HP Pavilion desktop (tower) and my HP Pavilion Laptop WITH the same OS, windows 7 Home Premium.

I have tried homegroup, mapping, and both together. Works OK for a day or two then starts getting "can not connect" on 1 o 2 of the drives, some "access denied".

Have changed All drives to permission 'EVERYONE' but right now, one of the drives 'can not access". Sometimes disconnect/connect works but not tonight.

Windows sharing drives me crazy as does their added/new permissions.

Do you experience any of these issues?
 


winterminator

New Member
....
1. Homegroup only works on Win 7 boxes. It clearly states that in the Homegroup information...
yeah, fully agreed, but listen, what an odd thing happened to me recently.
System is:
1. WIN XP Pro, 32 bit on desktop PC, wired
2. WIN XP Pro, 32 bit on desktop PC, wireless
3. WIN 7 Pro, 64 bit, on notebook, wireless

Both desktop PCs are on the same workgroup, they see each other.
Win 7 network settings on notebook configured absolutely "by default", I mean, homegroup created. And I CAN access wirelessly connected desktop PC (No. 2)! Win 7 also reports me, what the workgroup's name is.
On the other hand, I can find no way to access another PC with XP (No. 1). It's normal while I'm on homegroup, isn't it?
But WHY I can get connected to my No.2?
 


Last edited:

Andrew Stewart

New Member
It's not necessary to turn off homegroup completely to regain your user access. In Control Panel->Homegroup->Change advanced sharing settings, change the 'Homegroup connections' option from 'Allow windows to manage homegroup connections' to 'Use user accounts and passwords to connect to other computers'. You'll be prompted to log off and back on again, and after that everything works as it should.
 


Nanaki

New Member
Hi!

My problem is:

I have already changed to WORKGROUP!
And both my XP and Windows 7 laptops see each other ... the problem is, they do not let each other access their receptive shared folders. Windows 7 says, when I click on my XP computer icon in its Network folder: "cannot find computer" !

Anyone experiencing something similiar?
 


Trouble

Noob Whisperer
Nanaki:
Hello and welcome to the forums.
The "network path not found" or similar error is generally caused by third party applications like firewalls, Zone Alarm, Comodo, etc. and or third party Antivirus / Internet Security Suites running some type of firewall applet. I have even seen it caused by remanants left over from an apparent but not complete uninstall. You need to completely remove any such software that you may have installed currently by using the Programs and Features applet in the control panel, followed up by the vendor specific proprietary removal tool. Check this list here (http://windows7forums.com/blue-screen-death-bsod/50402-removal-tools-antivirus-software-drivers.html) if yours is not listed try Google to find it.
Here is a check list for you to run through, I know you've probably done most of it, but it never hurts to double check. Even the Windows firewall can sometimes cause this, if you've done anything to change it, including the dreaded clicking the "Restore Defaults" link. If you need any help with any of these post back.
Click start and type services.msc in the search box
Or hold down the windows logo key and hit the R key and type services.msc in the run dialog box
Make sure the following services are running and set to automatic on all machines.
1. Computer Browser
2. DHCP Client unless you are manually assigning static ip addresses to your machine
3. DNS Client unless you have manually assigned static DNS server addresses on you machine
4. Server
5. TCP/IP Netbios helper
6. Workstation
7. Look for Bonjour service and temporarily set it to manual or disable and stop. Also check services near the top for a
peculiar string containing numbers and or special characters, something like this
"##Id_String2.6844F930_1628_4223_B5CC_5BB94B87 9762 ##" disable and stop.
8. Make sure all machines have the same workgroup name "Workgroup" is fine.
9. All network nodes must be unique, make sure there are no machine name conflicts, and as strange as it may sound
make sure there are no missing or conflicting mac addresses.
10. Make sure Network Discovery is turned on, on the Win 7 machines
11. Under the network and sharing center, change “Advanced Sharing Settings” intelligently to suit your needs. Turn on
network discovery, turn on file and printer sharing, turn on pulic folder sharing, turn off password protected sharing,
and at the bottom Use user accounts and passwords to connect to other computers.
12. If your problem is with down level clients like XP and Vista and your Windows 7 machine is in a homegroup, leave it
and disable IPv6 in the properties of your network adapter.
13. Make sure NetBios over TCP/IP is enabled in the properties of IPv4 under the WINS tab on your network adapter.
14. Make sure file and printer sharing is enable on both and that local firewalls are supporting it.
15. Temporarily uninstall any third party firewalls or Internet Security Suites that may include some type of Firewall
applet (you can always reinstall them later) temporarily disconnect your home network from the internet if this steps
makes you say Whoa!!
16. Clear DNS cache at a command prompt type ipconfig /flushdns
17. Clear netbios name table cache at a command prompt type nbtstat -R
18. Use the ping command, ping each machine from the other by IP address as well as netbios name if either of these fail
you may have skipped over step #15 or the embedded windows firewall may have a problem so turn it off too,
temporarily for testing.
19. Then examine the netbios name table cache at a command prompt type nbtstat -c make sure that each netbios name
is identified correctly by it's proper IP address
20. Disable any network adapters that are not in use
21. Make sure that you have the most current up to date drivers for your network adapter(s) from the hardware device
manufacturer's website
22. Make sure you have the latest firmware updates for your router from the router manufacturer's website
23. In the case of an addon card insure you adapter is seated properly and is identified properly in device manager
24. In the case of a hardwired cable connection inspect the diagnostic lights at both ends of the cable usually amber or
green, steady when connected and flashing when activity is detected, yours may very, don't hesitate to swap out a
suspect cable or swap to a known good port on the router / switch.
 


Nanaki

New Member
Hi Trouble!

Cool username.
Thank you for the nice welcome! I followed step 1-11; I do not understand how to go about doing the rest, but I will try to find out more about IPv6.

Steps 1-11 resulted in (1) my XP being able to access my shared folders in the windows 7 laptop and (2) the windows 7 laptop no longer being able to see the XP computer.

You have given me a good start though, I am hopeful that I will be able to solve this issue ^_^
 


Trouble

Noob Whisperer
Type
ncpa.cpl
into the search or run box and hit enter
select then right click the adapter that you are currently using on your network and choose properties.
in the resultant properties dialog box make sure the Client for Microsoft Networks and File and Printer sharing for Microsoft Networks are both check. Uncheck Internet Protocol Version 6
select (highlight) Internet protocol version 4 and click the properties button
Make sure the radio buttons in both frames are set to Obtain ......automatically, unless you are familar with and capable of setting the requisite information using static values that you are certain will work.
Click the Advanced button
Select the WINS tab
Second radio button from the bottom "Enable NetBIOS over TCP/IP
OK your way back out of there
Shut down both machines and bring up the Win 7 machine first and then the XP machine.
Now open a command prompt and type
ipconfig /all
and hit enter
write down the IP address and host name of both machines and then again in a command prompt
type ping followed by a space followed by the other machines IP address like;
ping 192.168.1.222 (substitute the number you have written down
then type ping follwed by a space follwed by the other machines Host Name like;
ping Nanaki-PC
hit enter after entering the commands to execute and obtain the results. Were looking for something like Sent 4, Received 4, Lost 0
anything else indicates a problem so please let us know.
That should get you through step 14, but step 15 is probably the most important since most often the presense of 3rd party software causes these types of issues. Specifically software firewalls and Internet Security Suites / AntiVirus software.
Keep us posted and good luck
Regards
Randy
 


Nanaki

New Member
Update!

I was able to ping both computers using their IP, but they both cannot find each other: "pingn cannot find host computer Hime" ... hmm.

I have uninstalled AVG using the tools specified previously, and shut off the Windows Firewall on both computers.
And now, the XP comp. can no longer access the windows 7 laptop. Odd!
 


Trouble

Noob Whisperer
Perform steps 16 through 19 clear dns and netbios cache.
Double check and make sure that you have enable NetBIOS over TCP/IP on both machines network adapters in the properties of IPv4 under the WINS tab
and make sure you have enabled the TCP/IP NetBIOS helper service in the services console and set the startup type to automatic by double clicking the service. (type services.msc and hit enter) BOTH MACHINES>
 


Nanaki

New Member
Hi again Trouble!

Thank you for your patience! I am starting to beleive my computer is cursed ... stayed up til 4 am, did and redid all the steps, and the computers still are refusing to connect.

The nbtstat -c procedure worked on the XP, but the WIn 7 comp says "Status: not connected".

Also, the XP has no TCP/IP v4, it only has a simple TCP/IP, so I have worked with that one. Going to work now, but the struggle continues upon my return!
 


Trouble

Noob Whisperer
Keep us posted as to how you're progressing. In the mean time perhaps catch the XP machine up on Service Packs, and assorted updates, hotfixes, patches, etc. For that matter it probably wouldn't be a bad idea to make sure both machines are current, just make sure you don't allow the update utility to install any hardware drivers.
Make sure you have temporarily disabled any network adapters that you are not using so you can zero in on the actual physical adapter that is causing the issue and you're not getting extraneous superfluous message information relative to adapters that we are not even concerned with.
Do both of these machines connect to the internet with issue?
 


crashnburn

Well-Known Member
Did anyone figure out a fix for this? XP + Win 7 machines + a Synology NAS together? I have them but need them to be part of the same WORKGROUP and see each other.
 


This website is not affiliated, owned, or endorsed by Microsoft Corporation. It is a member of the Microsoft Partner Program.
Top