I don't know whether or not to trust this...

bruh

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Mar 15, 2023
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I was trying to install a train driving simulator (because I LOVE trains!) and suddenly my eyes beheld a beautiful sight, every vowel you could ever want in one easy installer. I was so impressed by this that I almost clicked Aaeaa without thinking about it (to install) but after giving it some careful consideration, I clicked ioiaia instead (cancel.)

I opened my browser and without delay I headed straight for VirusTotal's online file checking service and dragged+dropped the file onto it. I was beginning to get nervous now, as I waited for the results to come back, I was having visions of tunneling windows and errors left and right... But, to my complete bewilderment after waiting for a while, VirusTotal told me that the file was not flagged by any security vendors, and apparently it was completely fine. I have always been a person who puts a lot of trust into VirusTotal, but this one had me scratching my head. I though, "This can't be right." So that is what lead me here.

Should I still not trust this even though VT said it was completely fine?



is-AT141.tmp_IppbkmdsoT.png



At some point I may pick apart this exe to see exactly what secrets it holds within. Who knows, maybe it is all-knowing, and holds all of existence's wisdom.





Footnote: I hope that my post, written in story-telling format was at least somwhat entertaining to somebody out there.
 


It's always important to exercise caution when downloading and installing software from unknown sources, especially if it seems too good to be true. VirusTotal is a reliable tool for checking the safety of files, but it's not infallible. It's possible that the file you downloaded could contain malware or other malicious code that simply wasn't detected by any of the security vendors.

Even if the file is clean, it's important to be aware that downloading and installing software from unknown sources can still pose a risk. You never know what kind of data the software could be collecting or what kind of vulnerabilities it could introduce to your system.

If you're interested in using the train simulator, it may be worth doing some research to see if there are any reputable sources for downloading it. Additionally, you could consider running the file in a sandboxed environment or on a spare computer to help reduce the risk of any potential harm. And, as you suggested, examining the file itself could also help to shed some light on what's going on inside.
 


It's always important to exercise caution when downloading and installing software from unknown sources, especially if it seems too good to be true. VirusTotal is a reliable tool for checking the safety of files, but it's not infallible. It's possible that the file you downloaded could contain malware or other malicious code that simply wasn't detected by any of the security vendors.

Even if the file is clean, it's important to be aware that downloading and installing software from unknown sources can still pose a risk. You never know what kind of data the software could be collecting or what kind of vulnerabilities it could introduce to your system.

If you're interested in using the train simulator, it may be worth doing some research to see if there are any reputable sources for downloading it. Additionally, you could consider running the file in a sandboxed environment or on a spare computer to help reduce the risk of any potential harm. And, as you suggested, examining the file itself could also help to shed some light on what's going on inside.
Turns out the setup.exe was not malware and was completely fine afterall. The reason it displayed characters on the installer in that way was because the game is Russian, and my computer doesn't seem to know how to recognise those characters the way they were displayed on an installer, hence all the vowels. I installed it and it's just some really old Russian train simulator game from 2005.
 


Turns out the setup.exe was not malware and was completely fine afterall. The reason it displayed characters on the installer in that was because the game is Russian, and my computer doesn't seem to know how to recognise those characters the way they were displayed on an installer, hence all the vowels. I installed it and it's just some really old Russian train simulator game from 2005.
I'm glad to hear that the file turned out to be safe and that you were able to install the train simulator game successfully! It's always important to be cautious when downloading files from the internet, but sometimes it just turns out to be a language or encoding issue. Enjoy playing the game and happy train driving!
 


the tool only flags a product that others have reported and your train maker isn't something 1000s of people will install

should you turst it = no
i'll use a system thats discontected from other account i.e, not the same one you do your emails or banking with
 


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