Mapped network drive says access denied

MRF71

Senior Member
#1
How do I map a drive with UAC enabled? Is it normal to get a "folder destination access denied" error when trying to copy files to and from network drives? I am running win 7 pro x64
 


ussnorway

Windows Forum Team
Staff member
Premium Supporter
#2
map a drive with UAC enabled
with win7-10 you map a drive | folder or share using the wizard
press [windows key] + [r] and type or paste this code;
Code:
RunDll32.exe shell32.dll,SHHelpShortcuts_RunDLL Connect
Screenshot (92).png


access denied is tip that your network connection isn't up to the task... can be that your permission are not set right for the network or (more offen) that the network is over loaded and didn't process your request before the time allowed.

To be clear, UAC is not an issue when mapping windows drives i.e, the wizard does not care if the computer has UAC on or off but you may get asked to press the [ok]
 


BIGBEARJEDI

Fantastic Member
Premium Supporter
#3
Is your network drive on another home computer in your home network, or is it the network drive on a server in your home or on a corporate network server also outside your home? Connecting through VPN? This could make a difference; we'd appreciate some more detail on the location of the network drive you're attempting to map to.

<<<BIGBEARJEDI>>>
 


MRF71

Senior Member
#4
with win7-10 you map a drive | folder or share using the wizard
press [windows key] + [r] and type or paste this code;
Code:
RunDll32.exe shell32.dll,SHHelpShortcuts_RunDLL Connect
View attachment 32868

access denied is tip that your network connection isn't up to the task... can be that your permission are not set right for the network or (more offen) that the network is over loaded and didn't process your request before the time allowed.

To be clear, UAC is not an issue when mapping windows drives i.e, the wizard does not care if the computer has UAC on or off but you may get asked to press the [ok]
I have never had issues until I enabled UAC
 


MRF71

Senior Member
#5
Is your network drive on another home computer in your home network
Yes it is, My laptop is trying to connect to my son's laptop and the family desktop which again i'll say that I have NEVER had problems until UAC was enabled.
 


ussnorway

Windows Forum Team
Staff member
Premium Supporter
#6
I have never had issues until I enabled UAC
press [windows key] + [r] then type or paste this code
Code:
C:\Windows\System32\UserAccountControlSettings.exe
you can also just paste it into a shortcut for easy access to turn UAC on or off
 


MRF71

Senior Member
#7
Let me ask this... in general, does having uac on or off matter when it comes to sharing folders/drives across a network? I am not experienced with UAC because i've always had it disabled but a friend told me it's not wise so that's why I turned it on.
 


ussnorway

Windows Forum Team
Staff member
Premium Supporter
#8
Uac controls changes to your computer only and has no effect on network shares one way or the other. its there to stop muppets accidently buggering a office system they are unfamiliar with and on a home system where the user has administration rights it will simply ask you “are you sure you want to do that?”
 


MRF71

Senior Member
#9
Ok but why was I able to map c-drive and copy files to and from before uac was enabled and now it doesn't allow it? I am now able to copy to and from my d-drive but not c.
 


Spirit Wolfe

Well-Known Member
#10
Hello:

I do not post much, but I do read a lot from this site, so informative. Anywhoo, I personally think UAC is quite annoying, personally, if you are the only (and main) one utilizing that computer in your home...KEEP IT DIDABLED...lol. Only you know your computer's idiosyncrasies. I run two networks in my home, one upstairs snd one down. I have a central access point via my broadband modem's DHCP, in where I have two networked printers and two TP-Link dual-band routers. This means I am technically behind three firewalls (my broadband modem, TP-Link router, and my AVG Internet anti-virus program [which is a software firewall]), if I had to access remotely my Mom's hard drive on her notebook, it would almost be impossible because I'd have to figure out a routing table and for me its too much of a PITA, unless the computer and any other hardware is tapped into the main broadband's DHCP, like my network printers, in where as the two separate networks I built can access the two static IP addresses I gave them (from the broadband's DHCP) to each of the individual TP-Link netwworks.

I know you're (at least I don't think so) not running two individual networks, from my understanding, and if you are not, why are you not invoking Windows' Home Group (wizard) feature? Although to do this (easily) all computers should be on the same network. I have yet heard of that feature being implemented (without warrant) on separate networks. Also, are you an Admin on your son's computer? Do not forget if he is also an Admin as well he can overcome and override any precautions you have intended (I do not know his age ) to do. I hope I have been some help, even if in a small way.

Cheers!

Shane / Sawuwaya / Spirit Wolfe

Sent from my SM-G935P using Windows Forums mobile app
 


Neemobeer

Windows Forum Team
Staff member
#11
UAC is a security feature and should be left on, it does not have anything to do with mapping drives, this is a user level process and only makes modifications in the NTUSER.dat (users registry hive). An access denied message means you do not have permissions to the share. In a home network setting where there is no centralized authentication (LDAP) you will need to add a local account to the share on the computer you are mapping to. Grant it share access accordingly as well as verify that account has the same local permissions (Most restrictive wins). When you map to the share you will need to provide those credentials for authentication in the form <MACHINENAME\USER> <PASSWORD> Machinename will me the computer you are connecting to.
 


MRF71

Senior Member
#12
Hello:

I do not post much, but I do read a lot from this site, so informative. Anywhoo, I personally think UAC is quite annoying, personally, if you are the only (and main) one utilizing that computer in your home...KEEP IT DIDABLED...lol. Only you know your computer's idiosyncrasies. I run two networks in my home, one upstairs snd one down. I have a central access point via my broadband modem's DHCP, in where I have two networked printers and two TP-Link dual-band routers. This means I am technically behind three firewalls (my broadband modem, TP-Link router, and my AVG Internet anti-virus program [which is a software firewall]), if I had to access remotely my Mom's hard drive on her notebook, it would almost be impossible because I'd have to figure out a routing table and for me its too much of a PITA, unless the computer and any other hardware is tapped into the main broadband's DHCP, like my network printers, in where as the two separate networks I built can access the two static IP addresses I gave them (from the broadband's DHCP) to each of the individual TP-Link netwworks.

I know you're (at least I don't think so) not running two individual networks, from my understanding, and if you are not, why are you not invoking Windows' Home Group (wizard) feature? Although to do this (easily) all computers should be on the same network. I have yet heard of that feature being implemented (without warrant) on separate networks. Also, are you an Admin on your son's computer? Do not forget if he is also an Admin as well he can overcome and override any precautions you have intended (I do not know his age ) to do. I hope I have been some help, even if in a small way.

Cheers!

Shane / Sawuwaya / Spirit Wolfe

Sent from my SM-G935P using Windows Forums mobile app
Does homegroup share files just in users directory or on other partitions also?
 


BIGBEARJEDI

Fantastic Member
Premium Supporter
#14
Does homegroup share files just in users directory or on other partitions also?
>>>You can share folders, partitions, volumes, and network drives via HomeGroup sharing no problem. And you can also share folders on other physical drives in your same computer as long as the drives are seen in Windows File Explorer.<<<:D
<<<BIGBEARJEDI>>>

P.S. I have done all of the above options with HomeGroup sharing at one time or another. :)
 


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