Memory Management, occasional IRQL BSOD

Discussion in 'Windows 10 Blue Screen of Death (BSOD)' started by GrimGrape, Dec 7, 2015.

  1. GrimGrape

    GrimGrape New Member

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    So I followed the instructions to posting a BSOD help thread, I hope I did this right with the dump file, as this is all new to me. Details on the BSOD, this occurs when my system goes under a medium or high load, and is always 15 after my PC went under load, WITHOUT FAIL the last 8-10 times it has achieved that load. One thread soled someones Mem. management by updating Nvidia drivers, but this did not work with my GTX 950. I installed all updated drivers for my MOBO and GPU. Any help is greatly appreciated, the last 6 forums have been of no use, thanks.
     

    Attached Files:

  2. kemical

    kemical Windows Forum Admin
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    Code:
    *******************************************************************************
    *                                                                             *
    *                        Bugcheck Analysis                                    *
    *                                                                             *
    *******************************************************************************
    
    Use !analyze -v to get detailed debugging information.
    
    BugCheck 1A, {41792, fffff68000003318, 80000000000000, 0}
    
    Probably caused by : memory_corruption ( ONE_BIT )
    
    Followup: MachineOwner
    
    Hi,
    all the dump files apart from one were like the above. The other a Bugcheck A can also mean memory errors and indeed it cited 'memory corruption' as the probable cause. This can mean that you have some faulty RAM although drivers can play their part too.

    Windows does have a memory testing app but it can miss errors and the best app for the job is Memtest86.
    If you open the link below you'll see you can run Memtest86 in two ways. You can either burn it to disk or install it onto a USB drive it's entirely up to you. You'll then need to enter the bios to change the boot order so you can boot from either the Disk or USB stick you have Memtest86 on.
    You must test for at least 12 hours unless it becomes obvious there is a problem straight away
    Memtest86+ - Advanced Memory Diagnostic Tool

    If you unsure on how to change the Boot order via the bios this guide should help:
    Beginner Geek: How To Change the Boot Order in Your Computer’s BIOS
     
  3. GrimGrape

    GrimGrape New Member

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    Ok, that I can do, I installed W10 from usb, i shouldn't have a problem with booting to memtest86. If I can maybe squeze in the test tomorrow, if not I will have to wait until the weekend, as I will have need of my computer. I will report back after testing, and I will go from there.
     
  4. kemical

    kemical Windows Forum Admin
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    Sounds good. Good luck with the testing. Please post back with any updates.
     
  5. GrimGrape

    GrimGrape New Member

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    Tested in memtest86 for nearly 16 hours, and no errors occurred. After the test, I used my pc wondering if drivers were causing the issue. Again under a small strain, my PC BSODs most commonly with memory management. I even saw one faulty hardware blue screen. I am currently getting a replacement for my RAM.
     
  6. kemical

    kemical Windows Forum Admin
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    It could be that a driver is corrupting the pooled memory. You could try running the driver verifier and see if it produces a dump file.
    First though you'll need to create a recovery drive:
    Creating a recovery drive - Windows Help -
    This is because the verifier can sometimes induce a driver to bsod on start up forcing you into a bsod loop. You'll need the recovery drive to boot into safe mode to turn the verifier off:
    How do I fix a Blue Screen in Windows using Driver Verifier?

    Please post any new dump files.
     
  7. GrimGrape

    GrimGrape New Member

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    Boy it took a while, but this turned out to be an easy fix. Bought a new stick of ram, a different stick of G.Skill RAM that is more reliable, and the blue screens vanished. Returned old memory and paid less for new, better, working RAM on a holiday deal. Maybe this might help someone else, I don't know. In total, all of the blue screen errors I say were Memory_Management, IRQL_Not_Less_Or_Equal, Faulty_ Hardware_Corrupted_Page, Page_Fault_In_non_Paged_Area and a few others only once
     
  8. kemical

    kemical Windows Forum Admin
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    Thanks for the update and glad to hear your issue is resolved.
     

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