Now $10 reward to help fix my boot-hang issue... (sorry for newtopic)

Discussion in 'Windows 7 Help and Support' started by FalconFour, May 18, 2009.

  1. FalconFour

    FalconFour New Member

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    http://windows7forums.com/windows-7-support/5894-driver-power-state-failure-bsod-now-hangs-startup.html

    Since there's no way to bump a topic with new information, and I can't edit the topic title, the only way I can relay this additional information is to make a new topic. Sorry for the additional clutter, but I really really really really REALLY need this working in the next half hour or so! >.<

    Please? Anyone? I'm offering up $10 for someone to help me out here...

    "edit"... Well, since nobody was even remotely interested in helping, I figured out a "solution" on my own... I took out a stick of RAM and now run with 1gb, and it works once again. Definitely a bug in the memory management of Win7 RC x64. The RAM was fine and it consistently hung on startup, that's pretty much a definite memory manager bug. Hopefully it'll be fixed, otherwise that's gonna be a huge deal breaker for Win7!
     
    #1 FalconFour, May 18, 2009
    Last edited: May 18, 2009
  2. vdude

    vdude New Member

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    You know, that really sounds like the stick of RAM you removed was just bad ram... I have 4GB RAM with no problem at all...
    The BSOD was probably created when something tried to access the particular section of RAM that was screwed up, although the error message does seem odd.

    Remove the 1GB that you have in right now, and replace it with your other one... if it starts messing up again, it's definitely just bad RAM.
     
  3. FalconFour

    FalconFour New Member

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    Yeah, I thought it would be bad RAM too, so I Memtest'd it while I was futzing around. It was OK. I'll check it again later though... but the fact that it was consistently jamming at the same place makes me think it's more of a bug than bad RAM.

    Even with that stick removed, the computer still acts glitchy as hell (just like normal), and always relating to the video driver. At school, I had issues switching to an external monitor (had to disable and re-enable the VGA controller for it to "allow" me to switch to an external monitor even though it detected it). When I got home, it did its usual very-long-wake-up with blank screen, then showed a gibberish corrupted (but flickering/moving/"static fuzz") screen with a visible but frozen cursor (with shadow!) in a 640x480 area in the center of the screen. That screen actually appeared to be "hiding" a BSOD behind it, because the computer "crashed gracefully" with a logged BSOD upon reboot (it was grinding at the HDD for a while, then turned off immediately when I hit Power, just as a BSOD does). Prior to that "fuzz screen" coming up, the screen was totally off but was responding to keyboard inputs and network access for about 1 minute.

    Often times it hangs there when I come out of standby, responding to input with no screen, and I'm able to remote-into the computer and disable/re-enable the display driver through Device Manager, and the screen just *POOF!* comes back to life at the login screen (since I was using Remote Desktop). Yeah.

    But this is no different from the way it was acting with both sticks of RAM installed. Win7 has been doing this kind of stuff ever since I installed it. ATI/AMD seems to be totally uninterested in supporting Win7... oh where have I heard this before (*cough* Vista *cough*). If they keep up on this same track of "we don't want to support our own products", then... I don't see a bright future for Win7 either. We'll be using XP 'til the end of time! :p

    (Because really, XP ran near flawlessly on this laptop compared to the issues I'm having with 7... :( )
     
  4. vdude

    vdude New Member

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    Wow... what kind if laptop do you have?
    and btw, it kinda makes sense if there were RAM problems, and the graphics driver crashed as a result, since the graphics card usually shares on-board RAM (even if it is a discrete graphics card).
    If you're still having problems though, maybe a good clean install will help?

    I have a fairly new laptop, so if I install XP, I have more system issues than Vista >.<
    but most of the drivers, even the ones that aren't made for 7 but for Vista, work flawlessly.

    I will agree with you on the ATI thing though. It's just stupid. The driver is supposed to be for Windows 7, but it doesn't integrate into the power managment tools in Windows, and if I set the card to high performance mode, the card starts overheating and games start to freeze >.<
    However, the latest ATI drivers for 7 havn't caused any BSODs for me.

    And now that I read your title, that makes sense. The graphics card power states were messed up on my Mobility Radeon 3650 in Windows 7. Only the "Maximum battery saver" option had a normal name and worked without overheating my card too much >.<

    Although, if it is the driver problem, then how did removing a stick of RAM help? Less addressing space = fewer crashes?
     
    #4 vdude, May 19, 2009
    Last edited: May 19, 2009
  5. FalconFour

    FalconFour New Member

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    Eh, it is a clean install (only as old as the RC is - I installed it the day it was available). I even completely wiped my hard drive before installing it. And yeah, it's an integrated GPU so it shares system memory, but the fact that the issues only happen when coming out of standby (and how many things standby tends to screw up) makes me lean more towards a driver issue, since ATI hasn't even released a driver for Windows 7 on this thing yet. The only driver available is the one that came with Win7, and that one sucks serious a**.

    My laptop is new too - still under warranty with about 4 months left of its 1 year warranty. It came with a Vista sticker but I ordered it specifically with a blank hard drive. XP works near flawlessly on it after I was able to track down all the various drivers for it under XP. It was quite unstable when it didn't have all the drivers installed (and was relying on "standard"-everything drivers).

    Oy... my beef with ATI is that they refuse to acknowledge that 7 even exists (or so I've seen). Or if they do, they only do it for the absolute newest hardware that nobody even has yet. They totally ignore backwards compatibility, and worse, they provide Microsoft with broken drivers to ship with the OS.

    Surprisingly, I haven't had problems with power management in Win7. The different performance modes act in the same way they did for me under XP (going from Max Performance to Max Battery makes the screen "blink" as it switches speed). Brightness control also works much of the time. Now that I've figured out the trick to disable/re-enable the display driver, I now have an almost-always-working brightness/power control. But "almost always working" is a pretty crappy benchmark when it "was working fine" with XP... :(

    Nah, I think it's a timing issue related to dual channel operation. The "seemingly common" recommendation to solve a setup-time hang is to remove a stick of memory if you have 4gb RAM (reduce to 2), which takes you into single channel mode. I think by removing a stick of memory, it got out of dual channel mode and that resolved the problem for the moment. It may be the ATI PCIe driver to blame, but I dunno - with all the changes made to the memory subsystem in Win7, I sort of gravitate towards blaming those changes for the hang.

    I dunno if I should be eager to see Win7 RTM, or worried... it simply doesn't make sense to keep using XP today, yet MS isn't really offering us much of an alternative! Hopefully these sorts of issues are fixed before RTM. I've pretty much given up on hoping that MS will fix the usability issues with Explorer and the Start menu, but the least they can do is make it stable... =\
     
  6. reghakr

    reghakr Excellent Member

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    Deleted post...checking database error.
     
    #6 reghakr, May 19, 2009
    Last edited by a moderator: May 19, 2009
  7. FalconFour

    FalconFour New Member

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    wat...........
     
  8. vdude

    vdude New Member

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    Drivers & Tools | GAME.AMD.COM

    Try the drivers on that link. You said that it's about 8 months old, and if its an integrated ATI, I would think it's this driver... >.<
    ATI Radeon HD 3100 or HD 3200 series for integrated, right? If you have something older... hmm...
    Mobility Modder - DriverHeaven.net

    Maybe that mod tool will be of use to you?
    I think it's just replacing the installation interface, but hey, give it a try, and maybe it will work somehow :D

    Sigh... if only MS could try to do a better job with this stuff...
    And if the RTM isn't stable on a computer like yours, MS is just going to slowly shrivel up and die... >.<
    Then, it will be time to install ubuntu! :p
     
  9. FalconFour

    FalconFour New Member

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    Nah, nothing HD. Just Radeon X1200 (edit: "Radeon Xpress 1200", that is). It's a very, very tiny chip on the motherboard (about 1/4 the die size of the CPU). It appears to be the northbridge and GPU in one chip (judging by the fact that it shares a heatpipe with the CPU), so my guess is it's a die-shrunk version of an older ATI chip for the budget segment of the laptop market. Given that it's still in production (obviously...), I'd hope there would be support for it...

    I'm definitely going to check out those drivers/links though. I really need a newer driver. The one that comes with Win7 is dated 11/2008 (IIRC), and a newer version I found online for Vista is 1/2009. The newer version was more stable, but after "fixing" this lockup problem, it's become completely unstable when coming out of standby... I always have to blindly disable/re-enable it now! I think it may be something that "Last Good Configuration" did while I was trying to get the computer to start up again. Or Startup Repair. Something must've futzed with the drivers/files and made it unstable as hell again... =\

    edit: Wow, here's some potentially interesting information on this X1200... maybe it could be going as a different name!
     
    #9 FalconFour, May 20, 2009
    Last edited: May 20, 2009
  10. FalconFour

    FalconFour New Member

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    So... reliable solution to the unreliable problem with a reliable sequence. Blue screen (0x0000009F, DRIVER_POWER_STATE_FAILURE) at random. I mean random - not doing anything, just with the computer sitting idle. Reboot. Computer locks up at "Starting Windows". Take stick of RAM out, reboot. Windows now loads. Shut down, add stick of RAM back, reboot. Now Windows loads again.

    Booting to the Repair Mode works fine (Isn't that Vista based?). Ran Windows Memory Diagnostic, passed. So I don't think it's an issue with bad RAM, but rather something related to the whole sequence of events involving that BSOD which always precedes the startup lockup problem...

    Also tried downloading that driver and the tweak tool. Tweak tool made it install on my GPU, but the driver failed to load (Windows just used the default driver and it had a "!" over it). I think I'm going to go back to 32-bit Windows (in the near future) just to make things easier to work with... =\
     

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