Windows 10 NTFS Access Problems

Cainy

New Member
Good Evening Windows Forum,

I have a very bad problem with a (or better two) windows installation(s) and it's NTFS permissions..

First I am gonna provide you with all the info and problems I face:

The story:
My dad's pc was very slow on windows 7 on an HDD and so I thought I'd install him a fresh and clean win10 installation on a brand new 512GB SSD..
I unplugged the old HDD and installed win10 on the SSD by using a Bootstick created with MediaCreationTool.
Up to this point, everything looked very good and windows 10 booted perfectly and it does so every time.
Now I booted again and replugged the old HDD because he wanted to access the data on the old drive while using his new installation.

And here comes the big problem..:
He had no access on his C Drive (SSD, Win10) and also no access on his D Drive (HDD, Win7) up to the point where he has problems starting programs, writing data in specific directories and altering specific files.
I cannot say whether or not there is any distinct pattern in the data he cant access but there are multiple.

Things I checked myself:
1. If you boot from the HDD (win7) you have the same issues.
2. The account on win10 is an administrator
3. If you unplug the HDD and boot Windows 10, you have the same issues.

4. I tried altering the owner of the whole C: and D: Drive to PCNAME/Administrator and have the same issues.
--- When I try this, I get a error message for all the files I cant alter the permission on:

iu


(This is not a screenshot of the PC i talk about, because you probably wouldnt understand the language but it has the exact meaning)

So yes, I tried this "workaround" of changing the owner from TrustedInstaller to PCNAME/Administrator of the drive and the problem persists.

At this point, I have no clue what to do next and I am pleased to hear your opinions.

Thanks, John
 

Neemobeer

Cyber Security Engineer
Staff member
All accounts, administrators included, run as standard accounts unless the UAC is invoked at which point that given process will receive an elevated rights token running as an administrator.

Windows uses DACL permissions which can mean even an admin may not have access but it's up to their discretion (the D in DACL) to grant access. In some cases this is required.

If the drive in question is mounted on say D:

You can run the following two commands from an elevated command prompt (right click "run as administrator")
takeown /F D:\* /A /R (this will take ownership of everything on the extra drive) this is necessary to grant access
icacls D:\* /T /grant:f administrators (this will grant adminstrators full access on everything in the D drive.
icacls D:\* /T /grant:f users (same thing but for regular users as well.
 
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amrosia

New Member
All accounts, administrators included, run as standard accounts unless the UAC is invoked at which point that given process will receive an elevated rights token running as an administrator.

Windows uses DACL permissions which can mean even an admin may not have access but it's up to their discretion (the D in DACL) to grant access. In some cases this is required.

If the drive in question is mounted on say D:

You can run the following two commands from an elevated command prompt (right click "run as administrator")
takeown /F D:\* /A /R (this will take ownership of everything on the extra drive) this is necessary to grant access
icacls D:\* /E /T /grant:f administrators (this will grant adminstrators full access on everything in the D drive.
icacls D:\* /E /T /grant:f users (same thing but for regular users as well.
the first command worked but the last two commands did not. As you can see in the following picture. Is it going to harm my computer?
if yes, then how to reverse it?!
Screenshot 2021-08-25 234806.png
 

Neemobeer

Cyber Security Engineer
Staff member
Just remove the /E that's a typo switch and no it won't break anything.
icacls D:\* /T /grant:f administrators
icacls D:\* /T /grant:f users
 

Neemobeer

Cyber Security Engineer
Staff member
Third time is a charm. Helps if I use the right syntax.
icacls D:\* /T /grant administrators:f
icacls D:\* /T /grant users:f
 

amrosia

New Member
On the same D drive, new errors appeared. I made a folder on d drive, but while renaming the folder gave me the following error.
a nother errorScreenshot 2021-08-26 030839.png

and while deleting the video file, it gave the message of recycle bin is currupted
the picture is given for description.i am researching the web to fix it.
RecycleBiniscorruptedScreenshot 2021-08-26 031114.png
 
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amrosia

New Member
were these commands not to fix these errors. Then where do these errors come from?
recently did sfc/scannow and dism on c drive and chkdsk /f d: drive but still, these errors appear.
 

Neemobeer

Cyber Security Engineer
Staff member
It would grant access. Depending upon what's going on in the computer lots of scenarios are possible. If it's having major issues it would probably be easier to backup, wipe and reload.
 

Neemobeer

Cyber Security Engineer
Staff member
If setting the permissions did not work then there's some other issue going on. Potentially the drive has problems, corruption in Windows or malware as a few possibilities.
 

amrosia

New Member
PROBLEM: it is not possible to save files to d drive and install programs to d:/program files and the above problems shown in the screenshots.
SFC/scannow ,dism, and chkdsk /f d: should have solved the problem of corruption.
but since they did not then the problem is something else.
The problem should not be a virus or malware because it should have spread to the adjacent c drive or to the attached USB drives, but the c drive and USB drives are working fine.
Without formatting how can we fix this problem?
 
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