Stop Charging When Power >80%, Start When <=40

lm5

Member
The problem with having the battery at 100% is that it ages WAY faster than if it is kept at 80% or (ideally) 40%.
The battery of my Alienware notebook was almost useless after 2 years and completely dead a few months after.
If it had been possible to keep it at 80% or below, it would have lasted years longer.
 

Terost

Well-Known Member
The problem with having the battery at 100% is that it ages WAY faster than if it is kept at 80% or (ideally) 40%.
The battery of my Alienware notebook was almost useless after 2 years and completely dead a few months after.
If it had been possible to keep it at 80% or below, it would have lasted years longer.
That is correct. It also holds true to new phones with non removable battery.

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quartz

New Member
ok, this prompted an experiment from me

given that I didn't know much about batteries at all, I looked some things up. so Lithium Ion batteries don't have battery memory like Ni-Cad, but I downloaded a program called BattCursor, which gave me some information I didn't know existed

my battery is rated 40,604 mW. I bought it about 4 months ago (so basically it's new)

over the course of about 10 days, constantly plugged in, I got these readings, per day

40571
40448
40337
40315
40260
40215
40160
40093
40038
39.993

so lets say that's losing on average, about 50mW per day

that's losing about 0.1% of the battery capacity, every single day

so we'd be talking a knackered (stuffed/bodged/name of choice) battery after about 3 years, if constantly plugged in, and assuming the degradation continues at 50mW per day. which it may not.

once it got to under 40,000 mW, I chickened out and decided to try unplugging it - for all I knew discharging to 40% might lessen the total rated charge. on the first unplug, BattCurser capacity went straight back to 40604 - so it recovered from a minor dip of the 40604.

this battery was an ebay "similar" model, my original genuine Fujitsu battery that windows was telling me to "consider replacing", had been constantly plugged into the mains with almost no removal, for probably 5 years.

Battcursor told me the now-duff battery had a capacity of about 12,000 mW. at about 90% displayed "remaining" status, my laptop died - so windows was out by 90% reading 12,000 mW, so after being constantly plugged in for 5 or so years, we could say the battery had an *actual* capacity of about 1,500 mW? or 10 minutes

so this "auto switch off at 98%, auto switch on at 40%" could really be a useful utility/capability.

what I've actually done? I bought an inline switch off ebay, chopped my laptops 12v adapter cable, and I've put the switch inline, so once or twice per week, I flip the switch for ~60 mins, and let it get to 40% or so. (this means that I wont eventually wear out the kettle lead socket from physically unplugging it once or twice a week)
 

Terost

Well-Known Member
I use a phone app called AccuBattery. The app works fine.
7fe22812e7c33a4baf17b88f9c2ed3ff.jpg


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dsuich

New Member
Hey everyone,

to prolong battery life I would like a tool, program, way to have my laptop stop charging, when the battery is at 80% (or more?!) of its capacity. To then wait for it to drop to 40% and only then start charging again. This obviously can only be a temporary tweak (e.g. when the laptop is plugged in overnight) as I would need the notebook to be (almost) fully charged at times.

Any ideas?

Thanks!

Markus
 

Lakis01

Senior Member
What model is your laptop?

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I think I was already using my Lenovo y50-70 at the time, but I've been running on Linux for ages now, so I'm not really following this thread anymore; I just get the email notifications :)
 
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